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Education Policy

compiled by education new york online

Scroll down to read entries organized by topic alphabetically OR use the topic links at the right to jump to categories of interest.

Updated Thursday June 26, 2014 10:28 AM

Academic Achievement

Noncognitive Measures: The Academic Trend That Could Change Everything
Date CapturedFriday March 08, 2013 06:12 PM
Alan Boyle [For decades, standardized test scores, GPAs, and graduation ranks have been the gold standard in college admissions and hiring. But in recent years, there's been a shift to consider not just these hard numbers but also the more nuanced factors known as noncognitive measures that give a glimpse into who you are as a person and how likely you are to succeed, regardless of your knowledge level. Schools like Boston College and Tufts University and employers like Google want to know more than your test scores: they want to know about your personality and potential for achievement.]
New Kids on the Block
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 10:27 AM
By Lisa Sanbonmatsu, Jeffrey R. Kling, Greg J. Duncan and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn write, "In the end, we were surprised and disappointed by the inability of the Moving to Opportunity experiment to help poor children succeed in school. After following more than 5,000 MTO children over five years, we can offer some tentative conclusions about policy interventions designed to improve student performance. Moving poor families to neighborhoods that, while less poor, have schools that are only marginally better than those in the original neighborhoods is unlikely to solve the children’s academic problems. Interventions might be more profitably focused on factors more directly related to the child, family, and school. The question remains whether these same conclusions will hold after a full decade of living in new neighborhoods, especially for the youngest children who, because of the MTO program, will have spent their entire lives outside of public housing projects. We will be collecting additional data next year and look forward to learning more."
Relocating Poor Families to More-Affluent Neighborhoods Doesn’t Necessarily Lead to Improved Student Achievement
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 10:21 AM
A randomized evaluation of the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) program--a federal housing program piloted in five major U.S. cities that sought to relocate poor families by providing housing vouchers--shows that, contrary to expectations, moving families out of high-poverty neighborhoods has no overall positive impact on children’s learning. Using data on more than 5,000 children between the ages of 6 and 20, researchers Lisa Sanbonmatsu, Jeffrey Kling, Greg Duncan, and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn compared the educational outcomes of children whose families were offered housing vouchers through a lottery with those of children in families who entered the lottery but were not offered vouchers. During the first four years of the program, more than 4,000 families applied for the housing vouchers in the five pilot cities--Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York.
The Fordham Report 2006: How Well Are States Educating Our Neediest Children?
Date CapturedTuesday October 24, 2006 07:51 AM
The Thomas B. Fordham writes, "The Fordham Report 2006: How Well Are States Educating Our Neediest Children? appraises each state according to thirty indicators across three major categories: student achievement for low-income, African-American, and Hispanic students; achievement trends for these same groups over the last 10-15 years; and the state's track record in implementing bold education reforms. In this, the inaugural edition, just six states can claim even moderate success over the past 15 years at boosting the percentage of their poor or minority students who are proficient in reading, math or science. The study also finds that California, Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, New York, and Texas are national leaders in education reform--leading the nation with a dedication to solid standards, tough accountability, and greater school choice can yield better classroom results." READ THE REPORT BY CLICKING ON THIS LINK.
Education Policy Should Not Be Based on Programs that Cannot be Replicated
Date CapturedThursday September 14, 2006 12:06 PM
Education Finance and Accountability Program at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University (EFAP) Director John Yinger writes, "The use of additional funds does not, of course, guarantee success. Many schools undoubtedly use policies and practices that cost more than equally effective alternatives. But one cannot identify these alternatives simply by looking at a few successful schools. Instead, we need to continue evaluating a wide range of programs to determine which ones can raise student performance under what circumstances and at what cost."
A Closer Look at Charter Schools Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Date CapturedTuesday August 22, 2006 10:34 AM
NCES, "The school sample comprised 150 charter schools and 6,764 traditional public schools. The report uses hierarchical linear models (HLMs) to examine differences between the two types of schools when multiple student and/or school characteristics are taken into account. After adjusting for student demographic characteristics, charter school mean scores in reading and mathematics were lower, on average, than those for traditional public schools. The size of these differences was smaller in reading than in mathematics. Results from the second analysis showed that in reading and mathematics, average performance differences between traditional public schools and charter schools affiliated with a public school district were not statistically significant, while charter schools not affiliated with a public school district scored significantly lower on average than traditional public schools." Braun, H., Jenkins, F., and Grigg, W. (2006). A Closer Look at Charter Schools Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (NCES 2006-460). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
On the Public-Private School Achievement Debate
Date CapturedWednesday August 02, 2006 06:28 PM
Paul E. Peterson and Elena Llaudet discuss methodological problems with NCES's study requested by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), "The results from the Alternative Models should not be understood as showing that private schools outperform public schools. Without information on prior student achievement, one cannot answer questions about schools’ efficacy in raising student test scores. The NCES analysis is at serious risk of having produced biased estimates, because its adjustment for student characteristics suffered from two sorts of problems: a) inconsistent classification of student characteristics across sectors and b) inclusion of student characteristics open to school influence. To avoid bias, classification decisions must be consistent for both groups under study. This rule was violated repeatedly in the NCES study." PEPG 06-02. Program on Education Policy and Governance Department of Government, FAS Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
Comparing Private Schools and Public Schools Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Date CapturedFriday July 14, 2006 06:41 PM
This NCES study compares mean 2003 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading and mathematics scores of public and private schools in 4th and 8th grades, statistically controlling for individual student characteristics (such as gender, race/ethnicity, disability status, identification as an English language learner) and school characteristics (such as school size, location, and the composition of the student body).
Magnet Schools and Student Achievement
Date CapturedFriday June 30, 2006 08:48 AM
Author: Dale Ballou, Ellen Goldring and Keke Liu. This study estimates the impact of attending a magnet school on student achievement for a mid-sized Southern district, using admissions lotteries to sort students into “treatment” and “control” groups. Study finds a positive magnet school effect on mathematics achievement until add controls for student demographics and prior achievement. This suggests that despite random assignment in the lotteries, treatment and control groups differ with respect to student characteristics that have an independent impact on achievement. The most likely explanation is differential patterns of attrition among lottery winners and losers.
The Nation’s Report Card: Science 2005
Date CapturedWednesday May 24, 2006 10:52 AM
May 2006 Authors: Wendy S. Grigg, Mary A. Lauko, and Debra M. Brockway. This report presents results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2005 science assessment. In addition to national results for grades 4, 8, and 12, fourth- and eighth-grade results are reported for 44 participating states and the Department of Defense schools. The report also includes sample assessment questions and examples of student responses. Of the 37 states and jurisdictions that participated in both the 2000 and 2005 fourth-grade science assessments, nine showed gains in average scores and none showed declines. Of the 37 states and jurisdictions that participated in the 2000 and 2005 eighth-grade assessments, 11 showed gains and 4 showed declines.
The Early Reading and Mathematics Achievement of Children Who Repeated Kindergarten or Who Began School a Year Late
Date CapturedFriday May 12, 2006 10:38 AM
This Statistics in Brief examines the association between kindergarten enrollment status (e.g., repeating kindergarten or delaying entry into kindergarten) and children’s first grade reading and mathematics achievement. Based on the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K), the statistics in brief reports that in the fall of 1998 5 percent of all children in kindergarten were repeating kindergarten and 6 percent were attending kindergarten for the first time even though they were age-eligible to do so a year earlier (i.e., delayed entry). In terms of children’s first grade performance by kindergarten enrollment status, at the end of first grade, children who repeated kindergarten have lower reading and mathematics knowledge and skills than those who started on time. At the end of first grade, children whose kindergarten entry was delayed, in general, demonstrate slightly higher reading knowledge and skills than those who started on time. In mathematics at the end of first grade, children whose kindergarten entry was delayed kindergarten are behind their classmates who began kindergarten on time.
Explaining the Short Careers of High-Achieving Teachers in Schools with Low-Performing Students
Date CapturedSaturday December 03, 2005 01:47 PM
March 2005. Don Boyd (U at Albany), Hamp Lankford (U at Albany),Susanna Loeb (Stanford University) Jim Wyckoff (U at Albany).

Accountability

Give schools more time to comply with Contract for Excellence
Date CapturedMonday May 14, 2007 08:56 AM
Legislative Gazette reports, "Educators and lawmakers alike praised Gov. Eliot Spitzer for his landmark investment in public schools, but a Senate bill passed unanimously last week would allow certain schools more time to comply with new accountability measures the increased funding is tied to."
School districts advised to protect computer data
Date CapturedSunday April 22, 2007 09:43 AM
Times Herald-Record reports, "Threats to computer data pose a major challenge to school district financial controls, according to a top state official."
Boosting Accountability in New York's Schools
Date CapturedFriday April 20, 2007 09:12 AM
How to Meet the Governor's Historic Challenge, Thursday, March 8, 2007. A panel of state and national education experts gathered at the state Capitol in Albany March 8 to examine and debate Gov. Spitzer's historic education reform plan, which aims to hold New York schools more accountable than ever before. This page features a link to a slide presentation by one of the featured speakers, and also includes streaming audio of the event including John C. Reid, Assistant Secretary for Education State of New York; Thomas W. Carroll, President, Foundation for Education Reform & Accountability; Paul E. Peterson Director, Program on Educational Policy and Governance Kennedy School of Government; Moderator: David F. Shaffer, President, Public Policy Institute of New York State; Panelists: Carl Hayden, Chancellor Emeritus, New York State Board of Regents; Richard C. Iannuzzi, President, New York State United Teachers; Timothy G. Kremer, Executive Director, New York State School Boards Association; Thomas L. Rogers, Executive Director, New York State Council of School Superintendents; Sol Stern, Contributing Editor, City Journal and Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute.
Reading First: States Report Improvements in Reading Instruction, but Additional Procedures Would Clarify Education's Role in Ensuring Proper Implementation by States
Date CapturedFriday March 23, 2007 01:54 PM
GAO-07-161, February 28, 2007. GAO recommends that Education establish control procedures to guide departmental officials and contractors in their interactions with states, districts, and schools to ensure compliance with statutory provisions. GAO also recommends that Education establish and disseminate clear procedures governing its monitoring process. Education, in its response to a draft of this report, agreed with GAO’s recommendations.
Spitzer promises no taxes, more ‘investment’
Date CapturedWednesday January 03, 2007 02:55 PM
AP reports, "Most of Spitzer's address underscored his campaign promises, including a $6 billion property tax cut over three years and billions of dollars more for schools. Wednesday's proposals include: --Longer school days and school years, after-school programs and better teachers as well as greater accountability for school spending. 'There will be no more excuses for failure,' Spitzer said. 'The debate will no longer be about money, but about performance; the goal will no longer be adequacy, but excellence; the timetable will no longer be tomorrow, but today.'"
A TEST OF LEADERSHIP: Charting the Future of U.S. Higher Education, A Report of the Commission Appointed by Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings
Date CapturedSunday November 12, 2006 07:52 AM
Pre-Publication Copy September 2006. CONCLUSION: In short, the commission believes it  is imperative that the nation give urgent attention to improving its system of higher education.   The  future of  our country’s colleges and universities is threatened by global competitive pressures, powerful technological developments, restraints  on public finance and serious structural limitations that cry out for reform. Thid report has recommended strategic actions designed to  make higher education more accessible, more affordable, and more accountable, while maintaining world-class quality. Our colleges and universities must become more transparent, faster to respond to rapidly  changing circumstances and increasingly productive in order to deal effectively  with  the powerful forces of change they now face. But reaching these goals will also require difficult decisions and major changes from many others beyond the higher education community. The commission calls on policymakers to address the needs of higher education in order to maintain social mobility and a high standard of living. We call on the business community  to become directly and fully engaged with government and higher education leaders in developing innovative structures for delivering 21st-century  educational services—and in  providing  the necessary financial and human resources for that purpose. Finally, we call on the American public to join in our commitment to improving the postsecondary institutions on which so much of our future—as individuals and as a nation—relies.Working together, we can build on the past successes of U.S. higher education to create an improved and revitalized postsecondary system that is better tailored to the demands, as well as the opportunities, of a new century. U.S. Department of Education, A Test of Leadership: Charting the Future of U.S. Higher Education. Washington, D.C., 2006.
Suffolk County Court Special Grand Jury
Date CapturedTuesday September 26, 2006 05:52 AM
September 19, 2005; Term 1E. Grand Jury Report, CPL 190.85(1)(c). READ REPORT ON EDUCATION NEW YORK ONLINE.
Official Response from the Board of Education to the Comptroller's Audit (including Appendices)
Date CapturedMonday August 07, 2006 11:35 PM
William Floyd UFSD response to State of New York, Office of the State Comptroller draft Audit Report of Examination dated May 16, 2006, "Given the extraordinary time and money that was invested in improving its practices, the Board, the administration and the taxpayers of the District looked forward to your office conducting a neutral, objective, impartial and constructive audit of our current practices. Specifically, we looked forward to knowing - - in accordance with your stated purpose - - what current practices should be corrected or improved. We hoped to rely on your considerable expertise in following your recommendations as they pertained to 'current and emerging fiscally related problems.'"
No Child Left Behind Act: Education Actions Needed to Improve Local Implementation and State Evaluation of Supplemental Educational Services (full study)
Date CapturedSaturday August 05, 2006 10:36 AM
GAO-06-758 August 4, 2006. "GAO examined (1) how SES [supplemental educational services] participation changed between school years 2003-2004 and 2004-2005; (2) how SES providers are working with districts to deliver SES; (3) how states are monitoring and evaluating SES; and (4) how the Department of Education (Education) monitors and supports state implementation of SES."
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT: Assistance from Education Could Help States Better Measure Progress of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedThursday July 27, 2006 09:57 AM
GAO July 2006 study, "The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLBA) focused attention on the academic achievement of more than 5 million students with limited English proficiency. Obtaining valid test results for these students is challenging, given their language barriers. This report describes (1) the extent to which these students are meeting annual academic progress goals, (2) what states have done to ensure the validity of their academic assessments, (3) what states are doing to ensure the validity of their English language proficiency assessments, and (4) how the U.S. Department of Education (Education) is supporting states’ efforts to meet NCLBA’s assessment requirements for these students."
OFFICE OF THE NEW YORK STATE COMPTROLLER DIVISION OF STATE SERVICES STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT REPORTING OF VIOLENT AND DISRUPTIVE INCIDENTS BY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Date CapturedSunday July 09, 2006 09:39 AM
Report 2005-S-38, "We visited a representative sample of high schools and found that, at a majority of the schools, at least one-third of the violent and disruptive incidents documented in the schools’ records were not reported to SED. At several schools, more than 80 percent of the documented incidents were not reported to SED, and in a number of instances, the most serious types of incidents were unreported, such as sexual offenses and incidents involving the use of a weapon."
Forum Guide to the Privacy of Student Information: A Resource for Schools
Date CapturedThursday June 29, 2006 10:50 AM
This NCES guide was written to help school and local education agency staff to better understand and apply FERPA, a federal law that protects privacy interests of parents and students in student education records.
Evaluation of the Title I Accountability Systems and School Improvement Efforts (TASSIE)
Date CapturedMonday May 08, 2006 10:22 AM
This report is based on surveys of a nationally representative sample of schools and school districts that are working towards the NCLB goal of student proficiency by 2013-14. The study was commissioned to better understand how states, districts and schools are implementing the Title I accountability provisions of NCLB. SRI findings for 2002-03, the first full year of NCLB implementation, show there were significant gaps between the NCLB vision and the implementation of standards and accountability systems in schools nationwide. While there was broader support for NCLB in 2003-04 than in 2002-2003, the likelihood of reaching proficiency benchmarks varied greatly among states and school districts. The chances that a school would be "identified for improvement" were much higher for schools in districts that were large, urban and poor.
Should the federal government be involved in school accountability?
Date CapturedWednesday May 03, 2006 06:43 PM
This debate between EPI research associate Richard Rothstein and Hoover Institution economist Eric Hanushek, on the role of the federal government in education, was featured in the Winter 2005 issue of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, the journal of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

Achievement Gap

New Kids on the Block
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 10:27 AM
By Lisa Sanbonmatsu, Jeffrey R. Kling, Greg J. Duncan and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn write, "In the end, we were surprised and disappointed by the inability of the Moving to Opportunity experiment to help poor children succeed in school. After following more than 5,000 MTO children over five years, we can offer some tentative conclusions about policy interventions designed to improve student performance. Moving poor families to neighborhoods that, while less poor, have schools that are only marginally better than those in the original neighborhoods is unlikely to solve the children’s academic problems. Interventions might be more profitably focused on factors more directly related to the child, family, and school. The question remains whether these same conclusions will hold after a full decade of living in new neighborhoods, especially for the youngest children who, because of the MTO program, will have spent their entire lives outside of public housing projects. We will be collecting additional data next year and look forward to learning more."
Relocating Poor Families to More-Affluent Neighborhoods Doesn’t Necessarily Lead to Improved Student Achievement
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 10:21 AM
A randomized evaluation of the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) program--a federal housing program piloted in five major U.S. cities that sought to relocate poor families by providing housing vouchers--shows that, contrary to expectations, moving families out of high-poverty neighborhoods has no overall positive impact on children’s learning. Using data on more than 5,000 children between the ages of 6 and 20, researchers Lisa Sanbonmatsu, Jeffrey Kling, Greg Duncan, and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn compared the educational outcomes of children whose families were offered housing vouchers through a lottery with those of children in families who entered the lottery but were not offered vouchers. During the first four years of the program, more than 4,000 families applied for the housing vouchers in the five pilot cities--Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York.
The Productivity Argument for Investing in Young Children
Date CapturedThursday August 09, 2007 09:55 AM
Heckman and Masterov write, "We argue that, on productivity grounds, it appears to make sound business sense to invest in young children from disadvantaged environments. Sub- stantial evidence from economics, sociology and public policy studies suggests that children from disadvantaged families are more likely to commit crime, have out-of-wedlock births and drop out of school. Early interventions that partially remedy the effects of adverse early environments can reverse some of the damage done by disadvantaged families and have a high economic return relative to other policies. They will benefit not only the children themselves, but also their own children as well as society at large. While more rigorous analysis is necessary to obtain a better understanding of the effects of such programs, their precise channels of influence, and their precise benefits and costs, the existing evidence is promising." James J. Heckman is the Henry B. Schultz Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Economics, University of Chicago. Dimitriy V. Masterov is a graduate student in the Department of Economics, University of Michigan.
It all adds up to success
Date CapturedWednesday June 13, 2007 10:15 AM
NY Daily News opines, "Next year, Bloomberg and Klein are giving teachers the ability to closely track how well students are learning, so those who lag can get immediate special attention. And the mayor and chancellor are giving parents report cards that will grade how individual schools are working. The trends are moving in the right direction after years of stagnation, and the innate abilities of thousands of kids are finally being unlocked."
America’s High School Graduates: Results from the 2005 NAEP High School Transcript Study
Date CapturedFriday February 23, 2007 08:54 AM
NCES: Among those who took higher level mathematics and science courses, male graduates had higher NAEP scores than female graduates. Increased percentages of White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islander graduates completed at least a midlevel curriculum in 2005 compared with 1990. The GPAs of all four racial/ethnic groups also increased during this time. In 2005, both Black and Hispanic graduates were less likely than White graduates to have completed calculus or advanced science courses and to have higher GPAs.
Charter High Schools Closing the Achievement Gap
Date CapturedTuesday December 12, 2006 09:01 AM
Prepared by WestEd for the U.S. Department of Education Office of Innovation and Improvement. Study concludes, "Closing the achievement gaps that separate the academic performance of various subgroups of students is a central goal of current education reform efforts nationwide. Hard-earned progress has been made at the elementary school level, but high school students are not progressing nearly as well. Indeed, it is at this level that performance gains in general have been most elusive and chronic student achievement disparities among significant subgroups seem most intransigent. Yet success is not beyond reach. This guide profiles eight charter secondary schools that are making headway in meeting the achievement challenge. They are introduced here so their practices can inspire and inform other school communities striving to ensure that all of their students, regardless of their race, ZIP code, learning differences, or home language, are successful learners capable of meeting high academic standards." U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement, Charter High Schools: Closing the Achievement Gap, Washington, D.C., 2006.
Growing Up In New York: Charting the Next Generation of Workers, Citizens and Leaders
Date CapturedMonday September 11, 2006 10:02 AM
A report produced by SCAA, reviews the status of children and youth in New York State through charts and critical data. Authors write, "While many individual students have succeeded in New York’s public education system, students as a group show declining aptitude as they age. The implications for college readiness are obvious and alarming."
Reforms That Could Help Narrow the Achievement Gap
Date CapturedThursday June 15, 2006 09:08 AM
Richard Rothstein, Research Associate of the Economic Policy Institute, outlines a series of reforms, in addition to school improvement, that could help narrow the achievement gap.

Administration

The Autonomy Gap: Barriers to Effective School Leadership
Date CapturedFriday April 13, 2007 10:01 AM
By Hartford Superintendent Steven J. Adamowski with Susan Bowles Therriault and Anthony P. Cavanna. Based on a series of interviews with a small sample of district and charter-school principals, the report shows that most district principals encounter a sizable gap between the extent and kinds of authority that leaders need to be effective and the authority that they actually have. The researchers interviewed thirty-three principals in five cities located in three states-one western, one mid western, and one southeastern state. Participants were asked to rate the importance of twenty-one job functions, then report on their perceived level of autonomy over those functions.
The Second-Century Imperatives — Presidential Leadership and Institutional Accountability,”
Date CapturedMonday October 30, 2006 05:55 PM
NCAA REPORT FROM THE PRESIDENTIAL TASK FORCE ON THE FUTURE OF DIVISION I INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: "The Task Force has developed a series of 'dashboard indicators' that can be customized for each campus and that will allow comparisons with specific peer groups. The indicators will show where each program is compared to the norm.The goal is to moderate the growth of athletics budgets. How this is done will vary from campus to campus, but that it must be done on most campuses is the consensus analysis of the Task Force. The reality for effective reform of spending and revenue-generating behaviors for college sports is this: Each college and university must hold itself accountable for exercising its independent will as an institution of higher education. And it will do that best through well-informed, value-driven presidential leadership."
New York City Considers Plan to Let Outsiders Run Schools
Date CapturedThursday October 05, 2006 03:19 AM
NY Times reports, "Randi Weingarten, the teachers’ union president, urged the administration to make its discussions more public. 'I have been concerned about the sub rosa debate on whether to privatize the management of the school system for quite a while,' she said. 'On an issue that is this transcendent there has to be a real public debate.'”
Preparing Principals for High-Need Rural Schools: A Central Office Perspective about Collaborative Efforts to Transform School Leadership
Date CapturedSaturday July 22, 2006 08:30 PM
This article presents district administrators’ reflections about (a) the contextual challenges they face in leading a high-need rural school system in Central Appalachia and (b) the change initiatives they implemented to transform the principalship from school management to instructional leadership. The article presents perspectives by the district administrators and leadership educators involved in the district-initiated activities to change the culture of administrative practice. Browne-Ferrigno, T., & Allen, L. W. (2006, February 10). Preparing principal for high-need rural schools: A central office perspective about collaborative efforts to transform school leadership. Journal of Research in Rural Education, 21(1). Retrieved 7/22/2006 from http://www.umaine.edu/jrre/21-1.htm
Urban School Superintendents: Characteristics, Tenure, and Salary
Date CapturedFriday June 09, 2006 08:39 AM
The Council of the Great City prepared this report to improve public understanding of employment patterns and demographic trends among the nation’s urban superintendents.

Adult Education

Performance-Based Funding in Adult Education: Literature Review and Theoretical Framework
Date CapturedSunday August 20, 2006 03:33 PM
By Steven G. Klein, MPR Associates. "...this review draws on the higher education literature to explore the rationale for introducing these systems, processes used to design and implement allocation formulas, and lessons learned over time. It also summarizes how performance-based funding systems are applied in adult education and, where appropriate, provides examples of state systems to illustrate the mechanics of formula operation."

After-School Programs

When Schools Stay Open Late: The First Year Findings
Date CapturedTuesday April 03, 2007 06:20 PM
The first-year findings reveal that while 21st-Century after-school centers changed where and with whom students spent some of their after-school time and increased parental involvement, they had limited influence on academic performance, no influence on feelings of safety or on the number of “latchkey” children and some negative influences on behavior. [A “center” refers to after-school services operated in one school, and a “program” refers to one or more centers operated in one school district. The study measured impacts at the program level but not at the center level.] U.S. Department of Education, Office of the Under Secretary, When Schools Stay Open Late: The National Evaluation of the 21st-Century Learning Centers Program, First Year Findings, Washington, D.C., 2003.
After-School Programs and Activities: 2005
Date CapturedWednesday May 31, 2006 04:03 PM
By Carver, P.R., Iruka, I.U.. This report presents data on participation in after-school activities and programs in the United States. The data are from the After-School Programs and Activities Survey (ASPA) of the 2005 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2005). The data presented in the report are based on a nationally representative sample of students in kindergarten through grade 8. In 2005, 40 percent of students in kindergarten through eighth grade participated in after-school care arrangements that occurred at least once each week.

Art

Arts Instruction of Public School Students in the First and Third Grades
Date CapturedTuesday July 18, 2006 10:46 AM
This Issue Brief examines the changes over time from first to third grade in how often young children are exposed to arts education in the general classroom. The Brief also looks at differences in these characteristics by level of poverty and/or urbanicity of the school.

Athletics

BAT BAN OFF BASE: SCHOOLS
Date CapturedSunday November 12, 2006 07:37 AM
NY Post reports, "The Catholic High Schools' Athletic Association sent a letter to all 51 council members urging them not to vote for the measure, which would require all high schools in the city to use wooden bats for safety reasons."
The Second-Century Imperatives — Presidential Leadership and Institutional Accountability,”
Date CapturedMonday October 30, 2006 05:55 PM
NCAA REPORT FROM THE PRESIDENTIAL TASK FORCE ON THE FUTURE OF DIVISION I INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: "The Task Force has developed a series of 'dashboard indicators' that can be customized for each campus and that will allow comparisons with specific peer groups. The indicators will show where each program is compared to the norm.The goal is to moderate the growth of athletics budgets. How this is done will vary from campus to campus, but that it must be done on most campuses is the consensus analysis of the Task Force. The reality for effective reform of spending and revenue-generating behaviors for college sports is this: Each college and university must hold itself accountable for exercising its independent will as an institution of higher education. And it will do that best through well-informed, value-driven presidential leadership."

Attendance

Should teen mothers be held to truancy standards?
Date CapturedSaturday April 14, 2007 08:49 PM
A Shrewdness of Apes blog: "Well, here's an interesting dilemma: Well, here's an interesting dilemma: A 16-year-old student who claims in a lawsuit that her school district discriminated against her because she is a teen mother has missed 211 days of school over the last four years, according to officials in the Harrisburg area school district. A 16-year-old student who claims in a lawsuit that her school district discriminated against her because she is a teen mother has missed 211 days of school over the last four years, according to officials in the Harrisburg area school district."
The Determinants of Student Achievement in Ohio’s Public Schools
Date CapturedFriday August 04, 2006 01:08 AM
By Matthew Carr, Education Policy Director, Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions. Carr writes, "To capture the changing dynamics of both different academic subjects and students at different ages, this analysis evaluates student performance in five subjects (math, reading, writing, science and citizenship) across grades 3 to 12. This combination gives us 21 separate analyses, or mathematical models. Controls were also included for geography, student socio-economic status, race, and learning disability. This study breaks new ground by also analyzing the factors that influence student performance in charter schools."

Blogs

MISSOURI EDUCATION WATCHDOG
Date CapturedThursday February 02, 2012 11:25 AM

BMI: Body Mass Index

Applications for New Awards; Carol M. White Physical Education Program
Date CapturedWednesday March 21, 2012 04:55 PM
Federal Register/Vol. 76, No. 60/Tuesday, March 29, 2011/Notices

Civil Liberties

Revealing New Truths About Our Nation's Schools
Date CapturedTuesday March 06, 2012 05:54 PM
CRDC makes public long-hidden data about which students are suspended, expelled, and arrested in school.

Class Size

Chancellor Answers Critics on School Financing Data
Date CapturedWednesday July 18, 2007 08:34 AM
NY Times reports, "The city (New York City) this month said that it would use nearly half the funds to reduce class sizes. Detailed figures released by the city yesterday showed how much extra financing school districts and individual schools would receive, but still did not specify where class sizes would be cut. Critics say the distribution raises the question of whether schools that are relatively high-performing are getting too much of the money."
New York Suburban School Districts Among Top Spenders
Date CapturedSunday June 10, 2007 10:43 AM
NY Times reports, "New York’s high teacher costs are partly attributable to smaller class sizes: The state’s suburban districts, for instance, employ far more teachers than the rest of the country — 76 per 1,000 students, compared with the national average of 60 — but only slightly more than the New Jersey suburbs, at 74, and Fairfield, at 70. New York’s suburban districts, though, pay more for each teacher, even compared with New Jersey and Connecticut — about $133,000 in salary and benefits for each full-time teacher, compared with $94,000 in northern New Jersey and $100,000 in Fairfield, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Mr. Ernst said teacher salaries reflect higher costs in the state, and a more favorable legal and political atmosphere for labor in New York that makes it difficult to get concessions in years when money is tight. But Richard C. Iannuzzi, president of the New York State United Teachers, said teacher salaries were simply a further demonstration of the state’s commitment to education."
SCHOOL SANITY: COURT OPTS FOR RESTRAINT
Date CapturedTuesday November 21, 2006 06:44 AM
NY Post contributor E.J. McMahon, director of the Manhattan Institute's Empire Center for New York State Policy writes, "It will take a determined governor to prevent legislators and the usual special-interest groups from using CFE as an excuse to promote Albany's traditional education 'solution' - lots more money, no reform. But thanks to the Court of Appeals, these issues at least will be contested in the right forum. In one of his more beneficial legacies, Pataki stocked New York's highest court with judges who were unwilling to micromanage policy. They've now kicked the ball back to the Legislature, once and for all. CFE and its allies must turn their attention to direct lobbying of the people's elected representatives - which is just the way it should be."
What Research Says About Small Classes and Their Effects.
Date CapturedThursday May 25, 2006 09:46 AM
Bruce J. Biddle and David C. Berliner, Education Policy Reports Project (EPRP), Arizona State University.
One Size Does Not Fit All
Date CapturedThursday May 18, 2006 06:50 PM
One Size Does Not Fit All by Chester E. Finn, Jr. and Michael J. Petrilli Teacher Magazine, January 1999
The Evidence on Class Size
Date CapturedThursday May 18, 2006 06:45 PM
by Eric Hanushek 2/1/1998 W. Allen Wallace Institute of Political Economy, University of Rochester
INVESTING IN SMALLER CLASS SIZE: Focusing the debate
Date CapturedThursday May 18, 2006 06:37 PM
An EPI Policy Seminar Listen to the event

Clery

Addressing Emergencies on Campus June 2011
Date CapturedTuesday June 28, 2011 06:32 PM
United States Department of Education (USED) : Summary of two applicable Federal education laws administered by the Department of Education (Department): the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA), as amended. This Federal component is only one piece of what is necessary to consider in ensuring the safety of our Nation’s students, faculty, and school staff. A comprehensive and effective campus policy must incorporate all Federal and State policies regarding health and safety emergencies, education, student privacy, civil rights, and law enforcement, as well as specific local community needs.
The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting
Date CapturedFriday March 11, 2011 07:35 PM
FERPA does not preclude an institution’s compliance with the timely warning provision of the campus security regulations. FERPA recognizes that information can, in case of an emergency, be released without consent when needed to protect the health and safety of others. In addition, if institutions utilize information from the records of a campus law enforcement unit to issue a timely warning, FERPA is not implicated as those records are not protected by FERPA. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting, Washington, D.C., 2011.

Cloud Computing

FERPA and the Cloud: What FERPA Can Learn from HIPAA
Date CapturedTuesday December 18, 2012 07:01 AM
SOLOVE: Parents need to look at what their schools are doing about student privacy and speak up, because the law isn’t protecting their children’s privacy. School officials who want to develop a more meaningful and robust protection of privacy should talk to government officials who are tasked with complying with HIPAA. They can learn a lot from studying HIPAA and following some of its requirements. Congress should remake FERPA more in the model of HIPAA. If Congress won’t act, state legislatures should pass better education privacy laws. Because FERPA does not provide adequate oversight and enforcement of cloud computing providers, schools must be especially aggressive and assume the responsibility. Otherwise, their students’ data will not be adequately protected. School officials shouldn’t assume that the law is providing regulation of cloud computing providers and that they need not worry. The law isn’t, so right now the schools need to be especially vigilant.
FERPA and the Cloud: Why FERPA Desperately Needs Reform
Date CapturedTuesday December 11, 2012 06:51 AM
SOLOVE: Parents should lobby Congress and their state legislatures to pass laws providing better protections of their children’s data. This is an issue that should be of great concern to parents since educational institutions possess a staggering amount of personal data about students, and this data can currently be outsourced to nearly any company anywhere – even to a cloud computing provider in the most totalitarian country in the world!
Frequently Asked Questions—Cloud Computing
Date CapturedMonday September 24, 2012 10:25 AM
FERPA does not prohibit the use of cloud computing solutions for the purpose of hosting education records; rather, FERPA requires States to use reasonable methods to ensure the security of their information technology (IT) solutions.

Common Core

Common Core Postsecondary Collaborative
Date CapturedMonday June 03, 2013 08:13 AM
Year One Learning Lab; April 25, 2013
Implementing Common Core State Standards and Assessments
Date CapturedMonday June 03, 2013 07:08 AM
A Workbook for State and District Leaders
FERPA, COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS & DATA-SHARING
Date CapturedWednesday March 06, 2013 09:54 AM
Race to the Top Reform Flow Chart
Date CapturedSaturday September 29, 2012 10:04 AM
Chairman Gates' GERM warfare
Date CapturedThursday August 16, 2012 11:37 AM
Kris Alman

Community Colleges

Working To Learn, Learning to Work: Unlocking the Potential of New York's Adult College Students
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 07:36 AM
Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy (SCAA) and the Center for an Urban Future (CUF) study, "Specific recommendations include: * Provide financial aid to part-time students in their first year. In 2006, the New York State Legislature took the first step towards assisting working adults by establishing a 'part-time TAP' program. However, New York should abolish the pointless requirement that students study full-time in the first year to qualify for part-time TAP. * Abolish discriminatory TAP benefits and income thresholds for unmarried childless adults, so that they can receive the same benefits at the same income thresholds as all other students. * Abolish all previous financial aid schedules and get rid of the 'don’t come back' rule, which ties students who leave college and return later to the income and benefit schedule in effect when they first entered college. Since schedules are improved every few years, older schedules are considerably less generous than current ones. * Create a remedial education financing program outside of TAP, so that students can enhance their opportunity for academic success while preserving TAP eligibility for creditworthy classes."
Act On Fact: Using Data to Improve Student Success.
Date CapturedMonday November 27, 2006 03:28 PM
CCSSE has released its 2006 National Report, Act On Fact: Using Data to Improve Student Success. This report asks the questions, "Which students are having a more productive college experience? For whom is our current practice working? Who, if anyone, might be left behind? What are the differences in various students’ experiences? Are certain practices mandatory for some students but not for others? Should they be required for all students? What practices are built into the classroom experience now? Should we incorporate more expectations, activities, or services into coursework?"
Paying Double: Inadequate High Schools and Community College Remediation
Date CapturedTuesday August 29, 2006 07:22 PM
Alliance for Excellent Education Issue Brief, August, 2006, "The nation would realize an additional $3.7 billion annually in combined reduced expenditures and increased earnings if: • more students who graduate from high school were prepared for college, and thus did not require remediation; and • the students who drop out of college because they were not prepared for college-level reading demands were to continue and earn a Bachelor’s degree at the same rate as nonremedial students."
Transfer Access to Elite Colleges and Universities in the United States: Threading the Needle of the American Dream
Date CapturedFriday June 30, 2006 10:38 AM
Executive Summary of "The Study of Economic, Informational, and Cultural Barriers to Community College Student Transfer Enrollment at Selective Institutions", a study that was designed to deepen understanding of ways to promote transfer access. The study employed multiple methods of data collection and analysis to examine community college transfer student achievement; administrative and professorial attitudes towards community college transfers; and institutional policies, programs, and practices that promote transfer access. The problem of low transfer access was conceptualized as having three inter-related dimensions: (1) institutional economics; (2) informational barriers (particularly information about financial aid); and (3) cultural barriers.
Profile of Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Education Institutions: 2003-04, With a Special Analysis of Community College Students
Date CapturedWednesday June 21, 2006 10:24 AM
This report includes an analysis of community college students, examining the relationship between a measure of students’ degree commitment and their likelihood of maintaining their enrollment over the 1-year period under study. Overall, some 49 percent of community college students were classified as “more committed,” 39 percent as “less committed” and 12 percent as “not committed.” The results indicate that students who demonstrate a relatively strong commitment to completing a program of study (i.e., they explicitly report that either transfer or degree completion are reasons for attending and they attend classes at least half time) are very likely to maintain their enrollment for one year. Some 83 percent of the “more committed” students did so, compared with 70 percent of “less committed” and 58 percent of those designated as “not committed.”
The Toolbox Revisited; Paths to Degree Completion from High School Through College
Date CapturedSaturday June 10, 2006 08:03 PM
U.S. Department of Education. The Toolbox Revisited is a data essay that follows a nationally representative cohort of students from high school into postsecondary education, and asks what aspects of their formal schooling contribute to completing a bachelor's degree by their mid-20s. The universe of students is confined to those who attended a four-year college at any time, thus including students who started out in other types of institutions, particularly community colleges

Consolidation

The Impact of School-District Consolidation on Property Values
Date CapturedThursday August 23, 2007 10:32 AM
A Monthly Column by EFAP Director John Yinger. Yinger writes, "Overall, this evidence implies that consolidation yields net benefits to the average household in a small rural school district, but that consolidation is not popular with high-income households anywhere in rural New York."

Current law & proposed legislation

NY Assembly bill A.8474 same as NY Senate bill S.2357B
Date CapturedMonday January 23, 2012 12:38 PM
Requires active parental consent to release personal and sensitive information (categorized as directory information under FERPA) about students. This bill passed the NY Senate 62-0 in the 2011 session. It has been sponsored & reintroduced in the Assembly by Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal & in the Senate by Sen. Suzi Oppenheimer for the 2012 legislative session.

Curriculum and Instruction

SCHOOLS BRUSHING UP ON THE ARTS
Date CapturedTuesday July 24, 2007 07:02 AM
NY Post Chuck Bennett reports, "'I didn't want the arts to be a throwaway. I didn't want the arts to be some add-on, some feel-good thing. I think arts education is critical,' Klein [NYC schools chancellor] said. He added that $250 million in this year's school budget will go toward arts education, including the hiring of 141 new teachers. More students also will be eligible to receive an Arts-Endorsed Regents Honors diploma for taking a concentration in arts classes."
Changes in Instructional Hours in Four Subjects by Public School Teachers of Grades 1 Through 4
Date CapturedTuesday June 05, 2007 10:14 AM
Authors: Beth A. Morton, Education Statistical Services Institute--American Institutes for Research, and Ben Dalton, formerly of the Education Statistical Services Institute--Americian Institutes for Research. In the two most recent administrations, 1999-2000 and 2003-04, weekly teacher instructional hours in English increased while instructional time in mathematics, social studies, and science decreased. Despite the fluctuations in hours of instruction, total instructional time in the four subjects as a percentage of the student school week did not change significantly between 1987-88 and 2003-04; it was about 67 percent of the school week in each year.
Rigor at Risk: Reaffirming Quality in the High School Curriculum
Date CapturedWednesday May 16, 2007 07:10 AM
The Rigor at Risk report suggests that some students progress toward college readiness in high school, but many lose momentum during their last two years there. There are action steps that states and schools can take to improve the rigor of high school core courses: 1. Specify the number and kinds of courses that students need to take to graduate from high school ready for college and work. 2. Align high school course outcomes with state standards that are driven by the requirements of postsecondary education and work. 3. Hire qualified teachers and provide training or professional development support to help them improve the quality of the courses they teach. 4. Expand access for all students to high-quality, vertically aligned core courses. 5. Measure results at the course level.
BROOKLYN SCHOOL IN SPACE WAR
Date CapturedTuesday April 10, 2007 08:44 AM
NY Post David Andreatta reports, "Parents claim the new school would force PS 282 to cram 35 students to a classroom and compromise its art, science and computer-instruction programs."
Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software Products: Findings from the First Student Cohort
Date CapturedThursday April 05, 2007 09:16 AM
National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance study finds: "Test scores were not significantly higher in classrooms using the reading and mathematics software products than those in control classrooms. In each of the four groups of products-reading in first grade and in fourth grade, mathematics in sixth grade, and high school algebra-the evaluation found no significant differences in student achievement between the classrooms that used the technology products and classrooms that did not. There was substantial variation between schools regarding the effects on student achievement. Although the study collected data on many school and classroom characteristics, only two characteristics were related to the variation in reading achievement. For first grade, effects were larger in schools that had smaller student-teacher ratios (a measure of class size). For fourth grade, effects were larger when treatment teachers reported higher levels of use of the study product." Dynarski, Mark, Roberto Agodini, Sheila Heaviside, Timothy Novak, Nancy Carey, Larissa Campuzano, Barbara Means, Robert Murphy, William Penuel, Hal Javitz, Deborah Emery, and Willow Sussex. Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software Products: Findings from the First Student Cohort, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, 2007. Prepared under Contract No.: ED-01-CO-0039/0007 with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.
Reading First: States Report Improvements in Reading Instruction, but Additional Procedures Would Clarify Education's Role in Ensuring Proper Implementation by States
Date CapturedFriday March 23, 2007 01:54 PM
GAO-07-161, February 28, 2007. GAO recommends that Education establish control procedures to guide departmental officials and contractors in their interactions with states, districts, and schools to ensure compliance with statutory provisions. GAO also recommends that Education establish and disseminate clear procedures governing its monitoring process. Education, in its response to a draft of this report, agreed with GAO’s recommendations.
Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006
Date CapturedThursday November 09, 2006 08:46 AM
Study concludes: "Problem areas identified in previous years are still seen as areas of concern among academic leaders. • Only 4.6 percent of Chief Academic Officers agreed that there are no significant barriers to widespread adoption of online learning. • Nearly two-thirds of the academic leaders cite the need for more discipline on the part of online students as a critical barrier. • Faculty issues, both acceptance of online and the need for greater time and effort to teach online, are also important barriers. • Neither a perceived lack of demand on the part of potential students nor the acceptance of an online degree by potential employers was seen as a critical barrier." I. Elaine Allen, Ph.D., and Jeff Seaman, Ph.D., November 2006
Differentiated Curriculum Enhancement in Inclusive Middle School Science: Effects on Classroom and High-Stakes Tests
Date CapturedWednesday November 01, 2006 03:16 PM
By Mastropieri, Margo A; Scruggs, Thomas E; Norland, Jennifer J; Berkeley, Sheri; Et al. Researchers find, "The present investigation supports the effectiveness of using differentiated learning activities with peer partners in middle school inclusive science classes, not only on content posttests, but also on high-stakes end-of-year tests. When using peermediation combined with differentiated science activities, students appear to learn more content than when taught more traditionally, without peer- mediated learning activities."
Video-gaming American schools
Date CapturedThursday October 19, 2006 09:18 AM
The Enquirer reports, "One of the nation's most prestigious scientific groups on Tuesday put video games into play in an ambitious new bid to transform American education. The Federation of American Scientists called for major investment in digital educational games that could reshape how students learn and workers are trained for 21st century jobs."
The Accuracy and Effectiveness of Adequate Yearly Progress, NCLB's School Evaluation System
Date CapturedFriday October 06, 2006 07:06 PM
William J. Mathis writes, "Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is the key element of the accountability system mandated by the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This report reveals that AYP in its 2006 form as the prime indicator of academic achievement is not supported by reliable evidence. Expecting all children to reach mastery level on their state’s standardized tests by 2014, the fundamental requirement of AYP, is unrealistic. The growth model and other improvement proposals now on the table do not have sufficient power to resolve the underlying problems of the system. In addition, the program, whether conceived as implementation costs or remedial costs, is significantly underfunded in a way that will disproportionately penalize schools attended by the neediest children. Further, the curriculum is being narrowed to focus on tested areas at the cost of other vital educational purposes." Mathis, William J., Rutland Northeast Supervisory Union, University of Vermont.
The State of State World History Standards 2006
Date CapturedTuesday June 06, 2006 07:47 AM
Historian Walter Russel Mead, author of Fordham's The State of State World History Standards 2006, found that thirty-three states deserved D or F grades for their world history standards. And without standards that competently organize the subject’s vast expanses, textbook writers and curriculum developers will be left guessing, teachers won’t know what to teach, students will be adrift, and parents will be bewildered. America's future generations will be unprepared to operate and compete successfully in an international society.
The 2006 National Geographic-Roper Survey of Geographic Literacy
Date CapturedWednesday May 03, 2006 09:28 AM
These results suggest that young people in the United States—the most recent graduates of our educational system—are unprepared for an increasingly global future. Far too many lack even the most basic skills for navigating the international economy or understanding the relationships among people and places that provide critical context for world events.
Teaching Science in Five Countries: Results From the TIMSS 1999 Video Study
Date CapturedTuesday April 04, 2006 10:36 PM
Roth, Druker, Garnier, Lemmens, Chen, Kawanaka, Rasmussen, Trubacova, Warvi, Okamoto, Gonzales, Stigler, and Gallimore. April 2006. This Statistical Analysis report presents findings from the 1999 Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Video Study of eighth-grade science teaching in five countries: Australia, Czech Republic, Japan, Netherlands, and the United States. The study is the first attempt to examine eighth-grade science lessons as they are actually delivered to students. The data presented focus on three basic questions: How did the teacher organize the lesson to support students’ opportunities to learn science? How was science represented to students in the lesson? What opportunities did students have to participate in science learning activities?

Cyber Bullying

CYBERBULLYING: A Report on Bullying in a Digital Age
Date CapturedTuesday December 27, 2011 02:28 PM
NY Senate Independent Democratic Conference Sept. 2011 report.
Student Reports of Bullying and Cyber-Bullying: Results From the 2009 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey
Date CapturedMonday September 05, 2011 01:33 PM
In school year 2008–09, some 7,066,000 U.S. students ages 12 through 18, or 28.0 percent of all such students, reported they were bullied at school, and about 1,521,000, or 6.0 percent, reported they were cyber-bullied anywhere (i.e., on or off school property). eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. Furthermore, the tables use the SCS data to show the relationship between bullying and cyber-bullying victimization and other variables of interest, such as the reported presence of

Data Broker

American Student List (ASL)
Date CapturedMonday March 07, 2011 05:39 PM
Student data for sale ONLINE. College Bound High School Students - Over 3 million high school juniors and seniors who have indicated an interest in higher education. Selectable by class year, age, head of household, income, geography and more; Teenage Lifestyle Interests - 5 million individuals ages 14-19. Selectable by self-reported interests in specific areas including sports, scholastic activities, careers, computers and more; College Students - Approximately 5 million students attending numerous colleges and universities. Home and/or school addresses and phone numbers are available. Selectable by class year, field of study, college attended, tuition level, competitive rank and more; College Grads And Alumni - Approximately 17 million College Grads/Alumni. Selectable by school last attended, household income, home ownership and more; Families With Children - 20 million households with the presence of children, tweens and teens (newborn through age 19). Selectable by head of household, income, gender, ethnicity, geography and more. Ethnic Lists - Over 3 million Ethnic Teens, 4.5 million Ethnic Families and 15 million Ethnic Young Adults. Numerous backgrounds are available including Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, Native-American, African-American and more. Also available — Foreign-Speaking Teens — first- or second-generation teens who speak the language of their ethnic group.
On the Leakage of Personally Identi?able Information Via Online Social Networks
Date CapturedWednesday June 02, 2010 10:01 PM
Balachander Krishnamurthy and Craig E. Wills - [Abstract For purposes of this paper, we de?ne “Personally identi?- able information” (PII) as information which can be used to distinguish or trace an individual’s identity either alone or when combined with other information that is linkable to a speci?c individual. The popularity of Online Social Net- works (OSN) has accelerated the appearance of vast amounts of personal information on the Internet. Our research shows that it is possible for third-parties to link PII, which is leaked via OSNs, with user actions both within OSN sites and else- where on non-OSN sites. We refer to this ability to link PII and combine it with other information as “leakage”. We have identi?ed multiple ways by which such leakage occurs and discuss measures to prevent it.]

Data Mining

CA: State colleges, alumni groups reap $6.6M in credit card royalties
Date CapturedFriday September 02, 2011 08:29 PM
Erica Perez; Under the agreements, banks typically get exclusive rights to market credit cards to university students and alumni, and they pay royalties to the universities or related organizations based on the number of new credit card accounts opened.] Excerpt from source linked to entry: [university must give the bank mailing lists for alumni, faculty, staff, fans, ticket holders, donors, undergraduates and graduate students. The lists include postal addresses, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses.]
On the Leakage of Personally Identi?able Information Via Online Social Networks
Date CapturedWednesday June 02, 2010 10:01 PM
Balachander Krishnamurthy and Craig E. Wills - [Abstract For purposes of this paper, we de?ne “Personally identi?- able information” (PII) as information which can be used to distinguish or trace an individual’s identity either alone or when combined with other information that is linkable to a speci?c individual. The popularity of Online Social Net- works (OSN) has accelerated the appearance of vast amounts of personal information on the Internet. Our research shows that it is possible for third-parties to link PII, which is leaked via OSNs, with user actions both within OSN sites and else- where on non-OSN sites. We refer to this ability to link PII and combine it with other information as “leakage”. We have identi?ed multiple ways by which such leakage occurs and discuss measures to prevent it.]
Education and Workforce Data Connections: A Primer on States’ Status
Date CapturedWednesday April 14, 2010 06:16 PM
Data Quality Campaign - [States are currently working to connect education and workforce data, however, states are far from reaching the goal of having data systems that can link across the P-20/Workforce spectrum. To connect these education and workforce databases, states should engage a broad range of stakeholders to: 1. Prioritize, through broad-based stakeholder input, the critical policy questions to drive the development and use of longitudinal data systems. 2. Ensure data systems are interoperable within and across agencies and states by adopting or developing common data standards, definitions and language. 3. Protect personally identifiable information through governance policies and practices that promote the security of the information while allowing appropriate data access and sharing.]

Data-driven Education

Education and Workforce Data Connections: A Primer on States’ Status
Date CapturedWednesday April 14, 2010 06:16 PM
Data Quality Campaign - [States are currently working to connect education and workforce data, however, states are far from reaching the goal of having data systems that can link across the P-20/Workforce spectrum. To connect these education and workforce databases, states should engage a broad range of stakeholders to: 1. Prioritize, through broad-based stakeholder input, the critical policy questions to drive the development and use of longitudinal data systems. 2. Ensure data systems are interoperable within and across agencies and states by adopting or developing common data standards, definitions and language. 3. Protect personally identifiable information through governance policies and practices that promote the security of the information while allowing appropriate data access and sharing.]
Boston schools win top education award; Jersey City a finalist
Date CapturedTuesday September 19, 2006 08:48 PM
AP reports, "The Boston public school system won the nation's largest prize in public education Tuesday, earning $500,000 in college scholarships for making steady gains in the classroom. Jersey City's school system was a finalist for the award and will receive $125,000."The other four finalists will each receive $125,00. They are Bridgeport Public Schools in Connecticut, Jersey City School District in New Jersey, Miami Dade County Public Schools and the New York City Department of Education.

Diversity

The Segregation of American Teachers
Date CapturedWednesday February 21, 2007 09:44 AM
By Erica Frankenberg, M.Ed., is a Research Assistant at The Civil Rights Project and Professor Gary Orfield, Professor of Education and Social Policy and Director of the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University. "This report shows that in an increasingly segregated national system of schools, faculty segregation tends to add to — rather than counteract — the separation of students. We see that the white teachers, who continue to dominate the teaching profession, tend to grow up with little racial/ethnic diversity in their own education or experience. Not only did white teachers, on average, attend schools when they were elementary school students that were over 90% white, they are currently teaching in schools where almost 90% of their faculty colleagues are white and over 70% of students are white."
The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education
Date CapturedSaturday December 02, 2006 07:50 AM
The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education: A Briefing Before The United States Commission on Civil Rights Held in Washington, D.C., July 28, 2006 Briefing Report, "Based on the record, the Commission issued a number of findings, including: • There is little evidence that racial and ethnic diversity in elementary and secondary schools results in significant improvements in academic performance; • Studies on the effect of school racial composition on academic achievement often suggest modest and inconsistent benefits; • Studies of whether racial and ethnic diversity result in significant social and noneducational benefits report varied results; • Much of the early research indicating educational benefits resulting from racial and ethnic diversity in elementary and secondary schools suffered from serious methodological weaknesses; • A preliminary review of data on the overall relationship between school racial composition and student achievement as measured by the 2003 National Assessment of Educational Progress scores does not indicate a consistent strong relationship between the two after controlling for socioeconomic status; • While there are many research studies indicating that desegregated schooling is associated with higher educational and occupational aspirations , and to a modest degree, attainment for African-American students, methodological weaknesses in these studies make it difficult to isolate school racial composition as the cause of these aspirations and attainments; • While recent studies examining the relationship between desegregation and future wages found a small positive relationship after controlling for self-selection bias, research evidence on the relationship of school racial composition and actual wages is less definitive; • More recent surveys have indicated generally positive reactions to school desegregation, such as cross-racial friendships and greater understanding of racial and cultural differences, but some of these surveys do not definitively identify a causal relationship between the two."

Early Learning

The Productivity Argument for Investing in Young Children
Date CapturedThursday August 09, 2007 09:55 AM
Heckman and Masterov write, "We argue that, on productivity grounds, it appears to make sound business sense to invest in young children from disadvantaged environments. Sub- stantial evidence from economics, sociology and public policy studies suggests that children from disadvantaged families are more likely to commit crime, have out-of-wedlock births and drop out of school. Early interventions that partially remedy the effects of adverse early environments can reverse some of the damage done by disadvantaged families and have a high economic return relative to other policies. They will benefit not only the children themselves, but also their own children as well as society at large. While more rigorous analysis is necessary to obtain a better understanding of the effects of such programs, their precise channels of influence, and their precise benefits and costs, the existing evidence is promising." James J. Heckman is the Henry B. Schultz Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Economics, University of Chicago. Dimitriy V. Masterov is a graduate student in the Department of Economics, University of Michigan.
The Abbott Preschool Program Longitudinal Effects Study (APPLES)
Date CapturedFriday June 15, 2007 07:50 PM
by Ellen Frede, Kwanghee Jung, W. Steven Barnett, Cynthia Esposito Lamy, and Alexandra Figueras. "This report discusses the results of a rigorous study of New Jersey's Abbott Preschool Program. The study seeks to determine if the learning gains from the state prekindergarten program found in earlier research at kindergarten entry continued throughout the kindergarten year and assess the quality of Abbott classrooms. Findings form this study: classroom quality in the Abbott Preschool Program continues to improve; children who attend the program, regardless of setting, improve in language, literacy and math skills through the end of their kindergarten year; and children who attend the preschool education program for two years significantly outperform those who attend for only one year or do not attend at all."
SCAA Reports: Winter 2007
Date CapturedTuesday May 22, 2007 10:53 AM
This issue of SCAA Reports spotlights some of the key areas urgently needing attention in order to assure the success of more children, and identifies several strategies for strengthening early child development: by significantly investing in early programming through home visiting, welcome baby contact, quality child care and early education. Research has shown that these investments have the longest-lasting and greatest return.
Timing and Duration of Student Participation in Special Education in the Primary Grades
Date CapturedWednesday March 21, 2007 09:19 PM
Emily W. Holt, Daniel J. McGrath, and William L. Herring. This Issue Brief reports the timing of entry into special education and the number of grades in which students receive special education across the primary grades. About 12 percent of students receive special education in at least one of the grades: kindergarten, first, and third grade, including 16 percent of boys, 8 percent of girls, 18 percent of poor children, and 10 percent of nonpoor children. One in three students who receive special education in early grades, first receive special education in kindergarten. Half of those who begin special education in kindergarten are no longer receiving special education by third grade. In addition to students’ gender and poverty status, results are presented separately for other student and school characteristics, including race/ethnicity and school control, urbanicity, region, and poverty concentration. Data for this brief come from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Studies, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K).
The Economic Promise of Investing in High-Quality Preschool: Using Early Education to Improve Economic Growth and the Fiscal Sustainability of States and the Nation (2006)
Date CapturedSaturday March 10, 2007 01:50 PM
The Economic Promise of Investing in High-Quality Preschool: Using Early Education to Improve Economic Growth and the Fiscal Sustainability of States and the Nation, Committee for Economic Development. Selected recommendations: "CED recommends that communities, states, and the nation make access to publicly funded, highquality preschool programs an economic and educational priority. The economic benefits from preschool will be greatest when all children are provided with access to high-quality, publicly funded preschool programs. States with existing preschool programs should expand access by eliminating enrollment restrictions based on family income, and maximize program efficiency by coordinating state prekindergarten, federal Head Start, and child-care programs. To achieve the potential economic benefits, preschool programs should provide adequate contact hours to improve student learning and provide options for integrating high-quality child care to meet the needs of working parents. Furthermore, states should welcome a diverse set of providers that meet quality standards and the needs of the parents and communities they serve. Business leaders should advocate preschool and other complementary childhood programs and services, emphasizing the strong returns on investment, and the leveraging of current expenditures. CED recommends that publicly funded preschool programs meet the quality standards necessary to deliver the promised economic benefits."
FIRST 5 CALIFORNIA
Date CapturedThursday October 26, 2006 08:03 PM
Research shows that a child’s brain develops most dramatically in the first five years and what parents and caregivers do during these years to support their child’s growth will have a meaningful impact throughout life. Based on this research, First 5 California, also known as the California Children and Families Commission, was established after voters passed Proposition 10 in November 1998, adding a 50 cents-per-pack tax on cigarettes to fund education, health, child care and other programs for expectant parents and children up to age 5.
Growing Up In New York: Charting the Next Generation of Workers, Citizens and Leaders
Date CapturedMonday September 11, 2006 10:02 AM
A report produced by SCAA, reviews the status of children and youth in New York State through charts and critical data. Authors write, "While many individual students have succeeded in New York’s public education system, students as a group show declining aptitude as they age. The implications for college readiness are obvious and alarming."
$101.6 Million in Early Reading First Grants Awarded to 25 States
Date CapturedFriday September 01, 2006 10:29 PM
U.S. Department of Education: Early Reading First programs focus on language, cognition and early reading so that young children enter kindergarten with the oral language, phonological awareness, print awareness and knowledge of the alphabet necessary to begin to learn how to read.
Age 2: Findings From the 2-Year-Old Follow-up of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort
Date CapturedTuesday August 29, 2006 10:52 AM
This report presents information on selected child and family characteristics, on children’s mental and physical skills, on children's attachment relationships with their primary caregivers, on their first experiences in child care, and on their fathers. Mulligan, G.M. and Flanagan, K.D. (2006). Age 2: Findings From the 2-Year-Old Follow-up of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) (NCES 2006-043). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities and Preschool Grants for Children With Disabilities
Date CapturedThursday August 24, 2006 11:20 AM
Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education: The Secretary issues final regulations governing the Assistance to States for Education of Children with Disabilities Program and the Preschool Grants for Children with Disabilities Program. These regulations are needed to implement changes made to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as amended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (Act or IDEA). DATES: These regulations take effect on October 13, 2006.
Pre-K and Latinos: The Foundation of America's Future
Date CapturedMonday July 10, 2006 08:15 PM
Eugene E. Garcia, Ph.D., Arizona State University, College of Education, Tempe, AZ; Danielle M. Gonzales, M.Ed., Pre-K Now Washington, DC, July 2006. Providing Hispanics with much greater access to high-quality pre-k is critical to helping states meet the standards and mandates of NCLB. To maximize the benefits of increased Latino participation in pre-k, programs should be structured to build upon the existing strengths within Latino communities, including strong family bonds, a high value on educational achievement, and widespread support for public education and social systems.
"Taking Preschool Education Seriously as an Economic Development Program: Effects on Jobs and Earnings of State Residents Compared to Traditional Economic Development Programs"
Date CapturedThursday June 08, 2006 07:12 AM
Timothy Bartik, Senior Economist, The Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
"The Effects of Investing in Early Education on Economic Growth"
Date CapturedThursday June 08, 2006 07:08 AM
By William T. Dickens, Isabel Sawhill, and Jeffrey Tebbs
"American Business Leaders' Views on Publicly-funded Pre-Kindergarten and the Advantages to the Economy"
Date CapturedThursday June 08, 2006 07:05 AM
John Zogby, President and CEO, Zogby International
Initial Results From the 2005 NHES Early Childhood Program Participation Survey
Date CapturedThursday May 11, 2006 10:26 AM
This report presents selected data on the nonparental care arrangements and educational programs of preschool children, consisting of care by relatives, care by persons to whom they were not related, and participation in day care centers and preschool programs including Head Start or Early Head Start. It focuses on children under age 6 who have not yet entered kindergarten. For example, the report shows that 60 percent of such children were in some type of nonparental care arrangement on a weekly basis in 2005.
Public Hearing on Early Childhood Education
Date CapturedSunday December 18, 2005 02:12 PM
December 8, 2005: submitted by Karen Schimke, President/CEO Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy.
Early Childhood Education: How Important are the Cost-Savings to the School System?
Date CapturedSunday December 18, 2005 01:51 PM
February 2004: cost-benefit analysis by economist Dr. Clive R. Belfield, of Teachers College, Columbia University

eBehavioral Advertising

On the Leakage of Personally Identi?able Information Via Online Social Networks
Date CapturedWednesday June 02, 2010 10:01 PM
Balachander Krishnamurthy and Craig E. Wills - [Abstract For purposes of this paper, we de?ne “Personally identi?- able information” (PII) as information which can be used to distinguish or trace an individual’s identity either alone or when combined with other information that is linkable to a speci?c individual. The popularity of Online Social Net- works (OSN) has accelerated the appearance of vast amounts of personal information on the Internet. Our research shows that it is possible for third-parties to link PII, which is leaked via OSNs, with user actions both within OSN sites and else- where on non-OSN sites. We refer to this ability to link PII and combine it with other information as “leakage”. We have identi?ed multiple ways by which such leakage occurs and discuss measures to prevent it.]

Education Policy

2013 CASEL Guide
Date CapturedSunday December 22, 2013 12:47 PM
Effective Social and Emotional Learning Programs (Preschool and Elementary School Edition)
The Missing Piece -- A Report for CASEL (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning)
Date CapturedSaturday December 21, 2013 10:58 PM
A National Teacher Survey on How Social and Emotional Learning Can Empower Children and Transform Schools
Policies Solving Problems
Date CapturedSaturday February 18, 2006 01:46 PM
Center for Innovative Policy. Best Practices, 2006: Policies Solving Problems Facing America’s Families. Best Practices, 2006 is a sampling of ideas, innovations, policies, and practices.

Engagement

Demilitarizing What the Pentagon Knows About Developing Young People: A New Paradigm for Educating Students Who Are Struggling in School and in Life
Date CapturedFriday June 01, 2007 12:53 PM
CCF Working Paper, May 2007, Hugh B. Price, Senior Fellow, Economic Studies. "Millions of adolescents are marginalized academically and destined for oblivion in the twenty-first century economy. They barely, if at all, will be able to uphold their obligations as citizens and providers. The U.S. military figured out how to nurture and unleash the potential of young people like these generations ago. By demilitarizing and deploying what the Pentagon knows about educating and developing aimless young people, these troubled and troublesome young Americans can be transformed into a valued social and economic asset to our nation."

English Language Learning

Recommendations to Reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act
Date CapturedSunday June 10, 2007 01:20 PM
Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)
No Child Left Behind Act: Education Assistance Could Help States Better Measure Progress of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedFriday March 23, 2007 01:44 PM
GAO-07-646T, March 23, 2007. The GAO report recommended that Education (1) support research on accommodations, (2) identify and provide technical support states need to ensure the validity of academic assessments, (3) publish additional guidance on requirements for assessing English language proficiency, and (4) explore ways to provide additional flexibility for measuring annual progress for these students. Education generally agreed with our recommendations and has taken a number of steps to address them.
Latinos Online: Hispanics with lower levels of education and English proficiency remain largely disconnected from the internet
Date CapturedThursday March 15, 2007 06:28 PM
By Susannah Fox, Pew Internet & American Life Project and Gretchen Livingston, Pew Hispanic Center find, "Differences in levels of education and English proficiency explain much of the difference in internet usage between Hispanics and non-Hispanics. Internet use is uniformly low for whites (32%), Hispanics (31%), and African Americans (25%) who have not completed high school. However, 41% of Latino adults have not finished high school, compared with about one in ten non-Hispanic whites and one in five African Americans. The same pattern is evident at the other end of the spectrum of educational attainment. College-educated adults all have equally high levels (about 90%) of internet use regardless of race or ethnicity, yet the college educated make up a smaller share of the Latino population when compared with non-Hispanics. Language is also a powerful factor, as internet use is much higher among Latinos who speak and read English fluently than among those who have limited English abilities or who only speak Spanish. Language is not an issue in the white and black populations as the shares of adults with limited English abilities is quite small. A statistical analysis of the survey results shows education and language are each highly significant factors when other differences in group characteristics are taken into account. When the different levels of language or education are controlled statistically, Hispanics and non-Hispanics show similar levels of internet use."
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT Education’s Data Improvement Efforts Could Strengthen the Basis for Distributing Title III Funds
Date CapturedFriday December 08, 2006 01:45 PM
GAO 07-140 recommends: To address issues related to Title III allocation, we recommended that Education (1) include clear instructions about how to provide correct and complete state data on the number of students with limited English proficiency assessed annually for proficiency in English; (2) develop and implement a transparent methodology for determining the relative accuracy of the two allowable sources of data—ACS or state data on the number of students with limited English proficiency assessed annually—for Title III allocations to states; and (3) seek authority to use statistical methodologies to reduce the volatility associated with the ACS data.
So Many Schools, So Few Options:How Mayor Bloomberg’s Small High School Reforms Deny Full Access to English Language Learners
Date CapturedWednesday November 29, 2006 07:08 AM
Key findings: ELLs Are Not Given Full and Equitable Access to All Small High Schools, Parents of ELLs and Students Reported Barriers in the High School Admissions and Enrollment Process, The Small School Policy for ELLs Appears to be Forcing ELLs to Remain in Large High Schools that Do Not Have Services to Meet Their Needs , Small Schools are Not Being Created in Queens, in which the Largest Number of ELLs Reside. A joint report by: The New York Immigration Coalition & Advocates for Children of New York In collaboration with: Chhaya Community Development Corporation Chinese Progressive Association Chinese-American Planning Council Council of Peoples Organization Haitian Americans United for Progress Make the Road by Walking Metropolitan Russian American Parents Association November 2006.
Overview of Public Elementary and Secondary Students, Staff, Schools, School Districts, Revenues, and Expenditures: School Year 2004-05 and Fiscal Year 2004
Date CapturedTuesday November 21, 2006 02:21 PM
This NCES report contains information from the 5 Common Core of Data (CCD) surveys: the 2004-05 state, local education agency, and school nonfiscal surveys for 2004-05 and the state and local education agency school finance surveys for fiscal year 2004. The report presents data about the students enrolled in public education, including the number of students by grade and the number receiving special education, migrant, or English language learner services. Some tables disaggregate the student data by racial/ethnic group or community characteristics such as rural - urban. The numbers and types of teachers, other education staff, schools, and local education agencies are also reported. Finance data include revenues by source (local, state, and federal) and total and per-pupil expenditures by function. Sable, J., and Hill, J. (2006). Overview of Public Elementary and Secondary Students, Staff, Schools, School Districts, Revenues, and Expenditures: School Year 2004–05 and Fiscal Year 2004 (NCES 2007-309). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
School and Parent Interaction by Household Language and Poverty Status: 2002-03
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 03:35 PM
NCES: Language minority parents may face a number of challenges when trying to communicate or become involved with their child’s school. This Issue Brief describes school-to-home communication practices and opportunities for parent involvement at school as reported by parents of U.S. school-age students from primarily English- and primarily Spanish-speaking households during the 2002–03 school year. Among the findings: A greater percentage of students in English-speaking households than in Spanish-speaking households had parents who reported receiving personal notes or e-mails about the student; receiving newsletters, memos, or notices addressed to all parents; opportunities to attend general meetings; opportunities to attend school events; and chances to volunteer. Differences were still apparent after taking poverty status into account. This Issue Brief was prepared by Christine Enyeart, Juliet Diehl, Gillian Hampden-Thompson, and Marion Scotchmer of the American Institutes for Research.
States, Feds Partner on English Testing
Date CapturedWednesday August 02, 2006 07:45 PM
Infozine reports, "Twenty-four states [including New York] are being invited to work with the U.S. Department of Education to develop acceptable math and reading tests for students with limited English proficiency (LEP). Eighteen were chosen because a review last month found their testing systems, particularly those for LEP students, did not meet standards of the No Child Left Behind law. Six states with approved systems were invited to lend their expertise."
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT: Assistance from Education Could Help States Better Measure Progress of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedThursday July 27, 2006 09:57 AM
GAO July 2006 study, "The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLBA) focused attention on the academic achievement of more than 5 million students with limited English proficiency. Obtaining valid test results for these students is challenging, given their language barriers. This report describes (1) the extent to which these students are meeting annual academic progress goals, (2) what states have done to ensure the validity of their academic assessments, (3) what states are doing to ensure the validity of their English language proficiency assessments, and (4) how the U.S. Department of Education (Education) is supporting states’ efforts to meet NCLBA’s assessment requirements for these students."
Public Education: Meeting the Needs of Students With Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedWednesday July 26, 2006 07:47 PM
This GAO report finds, "No clear consensus exists on the length of time children with limited English proficiency need to become proficient in English. Several factors make it difficult to generalize about how much time is needed." GAO-01-226 February 23, 2001.
AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT FREE TUTORING SERVICES UNDER THE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT IN NEW YORK CITY: A FOCUS ON ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Date CapturedWednesday July 26, 2006 11:18 AM
Advocates for Children of New York, June, 2006. "This policy brief examines the status of SES in NYC as of the 2004-2005 school year (the most recent year for which data is available) and compares, where possible, results from the first year of implementation. This report also analyzes the extent to which ELLs are eligible based on their attendance in designated schools, their enrollment in SES, and SES providers’ capacity to serve these students."
Seeking equity in the education of California's English learners
Date CapturedFriday April 21, 2006 07:17 PM
"Seeking equity in the education of California's English learners.” Rumberger, Russell, (with Patricia Gándara). Teachers College Record, 106(2004), 2032-2056
Diversity Spreads Out: Metropolitan Shifts in Hispanic, Asian, and Black Populations Since 2000
Date CapturedMonday March 27, 2006 12:33 PM
by William H. Frey, March 2006. Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program. Analysis of Census Bureau population estimates detailing the distribution of racial and ethnic groups within and across U.S. metropolitan areas since Census 2000 reveals that: Hispanic and Asian populations are spreading out from their traditional metropolitan centers, while the shift of blacks toward the South is accelerating. The Los Angeles and New York metropolitan areas contained 23 percent of the nation's Hispanic population in 2004, down from 30 percent in 1990. Of the nation's 361 metropolitan areas, 111 registered declines in white population from 2000 to 2004, with the largest absolute losses occurring in New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.
Improving Assessment and Accountability for English Language Learners in the NCLB Act
Date CapturedWednesday March 22, 2006 05:08 PM
Author: Melissa Lazarín, Mar 22, 2006. This report by the National Council of La Raza examines the impact of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) on English language learners (ELLs). It concludes that while the law has not been implemented adequately, it holds considerable promise for closing the achievement gap between ELLs and other students. The issue brief also provides a road map for policy-makers and school administrators for improving the law’s effectiveness for ELLs.

Enrollment

Projections of Education Statistics to 2015
Date CapturedThursday September 14, 2006 11:31 AM
This NCES publication provides projections for key education statistics on enrollment, graduates, teachers, and expenditures in elementary and secondary schools, and enrollment, earned degrees conferred, and current-fund expenditures of degree-granting institutions. For the Nation, the tables, figures, and text contain data on enrollment, teachers, graduates, and expenditures for the past 14 years and projections to the year 2015. For the 50 States and the District of Columbia, the tables, figures, and text contain data on projections of public elementary and secondary enrollment and public high school graduates to the year 2015. In addition, the report includes a methodology section describing models and assumptions used to develop national and state-level projections. Hussar. W.J., and Bailey, T.M. (2006). Projections of Education Statistics to 2015 (NCES 2006-084). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Equity

EDUCATION INTERRUPTED: The Growing Use of Suspensions in New York City’s Public Schools
Date CapturedThursday October 13, 2011 04:16 PM
This report analyzes 449,513 suspensions served by New York City students from 1999 to 2009 to draw a picture of zero tolerance practices in the nation’s largest school district. The number of suspensions served each school year has nearly doubled in a decade—even though the student population has decreased over the same period—sending a clear message that public education is a reward for “good” behavior, rather than a fundamental right. This section explains the methodology we used to analyze the suspension data, and provides valuable background on zero tolerance discipline. Section II provides an overview of New York City disciplinary policies and practices. It examines the ever- increasing emphasis on out-of-class and out-of-school suspensions in New York City’s Discipline Code, which governs student behavior. This section also analyzes the impact that NYPD school safety officers have had on the increasing reliance on suspensions and arrests as primary disciplinary tools. Section III analyzes 10 years of school discipline data in New York City, explaining the data behind our conclusions. Finally, the report concludes with our recommendations for the DOE, as well as city and state lawmakers.
The Confidence Men
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 10:09 AM
By Eric Hanushek . Hanushek writes, "Clients want a bottom-line statement about how much spending would provide an adequate education, and they want this cost estimate attached to their specific state. Few people care about the 'studies' on which consultants base their reports, or even their validity, because nobody really expects schools to implement these specific programs if given extra funding. Clients simply want a requisite amount of scientific aura around the number that will become the rallying flag for political and legal actions. Summing the added cost of the separate programs suggested by Picus and Odden, I estimate that the overall plan, if fully applied, would increase average spending in Washington by $1,760 to $2,760 per student, or 23 to 35 percent. This estimate of the increased spending necessary to achieve “adequacy” is very similar to the percentage increases they have recommended to other states, and numbers like these will presumably become part of the headlines surrounding the new court case. But pity the poor states that actually implement the Picus and Odden plan. They are sure to be disappointed by the results, and most taxpayers (those who do not work for the schools) will be noticeably poorer."
Chancellor Answers Critics on School Financing Data
Date CapturedWednesday July 18, 2007 08:34 AM
NY Times reports, "The city (New York City) this month said that it would use nearly half the funds to reduce class sizes. Detailed figures released by the city yesterday showed how much extra financing school districts and individual schools would receive, but still did not specify where class sizes would be cut. Critics say the distribution raises the question of whether schools that are relatively high-performing are getting too much of the money."
Money, Not Race, Fuels New Push to Buoy Schools
Date CapturedSaturday June 30, 2007 11:13 AM
NY Times TAMAR LEWIN and DAVID M. HERSZENHORN report, "For several years, two lawyers intent on helping black children do as well in school as white children had a kind of roadshow: Michael A. Rebell would describe the recent successes of state-court litigation, forcing more financing for poor children’s schools, as a matter of basic equity. But James Ryan would argue that integration was the best approach. "
Rescuing Brown v. Board of Education: Profiles of Twelve School Districts Pursuing Socioeconomic School Integration
Date CapturedFriday June 29, 2007 02:07 PM
By RICHARD D. KAHLENBERG, SENIOR FELLOW AT THE CENTURY FOUNDATION concludes, "Making American schools integrated is tough work, requiring strong political leadership and a sustained commitment to the promise of equal opportunity. The U.S. Supreme Court’s decisions in the Louisville and Seattle cases present new obstacles, but across the country, school districts are not giving up, and indeed, are coming up with an alternative that can be an even more powerful engine for social mobility."
District using busing information in study
Date CapturedMonday May 07, 2007 10:56 AM
uticaOD.com reports, "School district leaders will rely on computer software programs to study the city's student population."
Latinos Online: Hispanics with lower levels of education and English proficiency remain largely disconnected from the internet
Date CapturedThursday March 15, 2007 06:28 PM
By Susannah Fox, Pew Internet & American Life Project and Gretchen Livingston, Pew Hispanic Center find, "Differences in levels of education and English proficiency explain much of the difference in internet usage between Hispanics and non-Hispanics. Internet use is uniformly low for whites (32%), Hispanics (31%), and African Americans (25%) who have not completed high school. However, 41% of Latino adults have not finished high school, compared with about one in ten non-Hispanic whites and one in five African Americans. The same pattern is evident at the other end of the spectrum of educational attainment. College-educated adults all have equally high levels (about 90%) of internet use regardless of race or ethnicity, yet the college educated make up a smaller share of the Latino population when compared with non-Hispanics. Language is also a powerful factor, as internet use is much higher among Latinos who speak and read English fluently than among those who have limited English abilities or who only speak Spanish. Language is not an issue in the white and black populations as the shares of adults with limited English abilities is quite small. A statistical analysis of the survey results shows education and language are each highly significant factors when other differences in group characteristics are taken into account. When the different levels of language or education are controlled statistically, Hispanics and non-Hispanics show similar levels of internet use."
The Economic Promise of Investing in High-Quality Preschool: Using Early Education to Improve Economic Growth and the Fiscal Sustainability of States and the Nation (2006)
Date CapturedSaturday March 10, 2007 01:50 PM
The Economic Promise of Investing in High-Quality Preschool: Using Early Education to Improve Economic Growth and the Fiscal Sustainability of States and the Nation, Committee for Economic Development. Selected recommendations: "CED recommends that communities, states, and the nation make access to publicly funded, highquality preschool programs an economic and educational priority. The economic benefits from preschool will be greatest when all children are provided with access to high-quality, publicly funded preschool programs. States with existing preschool programs should expand access by eliminating enrollment restrictions based on family income, and maximize program efficiency by coordinating state prekindergarten, federal Head Start, and child-care programs. To achieve the potential economic benefits, preschool programs should provide adequate contact hours to improve student learning and provide options for integrating high-quality child care to meet the needs of working parents. Furthermore, states should welcome a diverse set of providers that meet quality standards and the needs of the parents and communities they serve. Business leaders should advocate preschool and other complementary childhood programs and services, emphasizing the strong returns on investment, and the leveraging of current expenditures. CED recommends that publicly funded preschool programs meet the quality standards necessary to deliver the promised economic benefits."
The Mexican American Struggle for Equal Educational Opportunity in Mendez v. Westminster: Helping to Pave the Way for Brown v. Board of Education
Date CapturedWednesday March 07, 2007 11:46 AM
RICHARD R. VALENCIA, professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the College of Education of the University of Texas at Austin writes, "Few people in the United States are aware of the central role that Mexican Americans have played in some of the most important legal struggles regarding school desegregation. The most significant such case is Mendez v. Westminster (1946), a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of more than 5,000 Mexican American students in Orange County, California. The Mendez case became the first successful constitutional challenge to segregation. In fact, in Mendez the U.S. District Court judge ruled that the Mexican American students' rights were being violated under the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The decision was affirmed by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Although the Mendez case was never appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, a number of legal scholars at that time hailed it as a case that could have accomplished what Brown eventually did eight years later: a reversal of the High Court's 1896 ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, which had sanctioned legal segregation for nearly 60 years." Teachers College Record Volume 107 Number 3, 2005, p. 389-423 http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11792, Date Accessed: 3/7/2007 11:44:54 AM
EdTrust Releases Funding Gaps 2006: How the Federal Government Makes Rich
Date CapturedMonday February 26, 2007 09:34 AM
"University of Washington Research Assistant Professor Marguerite Roza shows that, despite district bookkeeping practices that make funding across schools within the same district appear relatively comparable, substantially less money is spent in high-poverty and high-minority schools. Teacher salaries are the clearest example. Roza looks at salary expenditures in a variety of districts and finds troubling inequities in the allocation of this key resource among schools in the same district. For example in Austin, a city with one of the largest salary gaps, the gap in average teacher salaries between the highest and lowest poverty schools within the district amounted to $3,837. In a school of 25 teachers that gap amounts to $95,925 less per year for a low-income school; in a school with 100 teachers, the gap increases to $383,700 per year."
Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2005
Date CapturedThursday November 30, 2006 08:55 AM
"This [NCES] report presents 11 years of data from 1994 to 2005 (no survey was conducted in 2004) on Internet access in U.S. public schools by school characteristics. It provides trend analysis on the percent of public schools and instructional rooms with Internet access and on the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access. The report contains data on the types of Internet connections, technologies and procedures used to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet, and the availability of hand-held and laptop computers to students and teachers. It also provides information on teacher professional development on how to integrate the use of the Internet into the curriculum, and the use of the Internet to provide opportunities and information for teaching and learning." Wells, J., and Lewis, L. (2006). Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994–2005 (NCES 2007-020). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment
Date CapturedThursday November 16, 2006 05:23 PM
This NCES report shows that graduation rates dropped systematically as the proportion of low-income students increased, even within the same Carnegie classification and selectivity levels. Variations by gender and race/ethnicity also were evident. Women graduated at higher rates than men, and in general, as the proportion of low-income students increased, so did the gap between female and male graduation rates. The gap in graduation rates between White and Black students and between White and Hispanic students, on the other hand, typically narrowed as the as the proportion of low-income students increased. Horn, L. (2006). Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment (NCES 2007-161). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
The Invisible Face of CFE: New York’s Small City School Districts in Crisis
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 07:47 AM
Prepared by Robert Biggerstaff, New York State Association of Small City School Districts' and written by Charles A. Winters, former Newburgh administrator, study concludes students in small New York state urban settings suffer as much or more than children in New York City from chronic underfunding. Small-city districts have comparable poverty levels, draw from a less wealthy tax base and students fail just as much, if not more, than New York City children.
Giving Kids the Chaff: How to Find and Keep the Teachers We Need
Date CapturedMonday September 25, 2006 09:08 AM
Marie Gryphon, director of educational programs at the Institute for Humane Studies and an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute concludes, "Teacher quality can be improved dramatically when hiring managers understand the attributes that make for good teachers and are given the right incentives to make good hiring decisions. Many of the current public policy proposals to improve educational quality in American public schools, such as merit pay and hiring bonuses for teachers with subjectspecific expertise, attempt to create the same economic stimuli that are naturally present in competitive markets. Allowing families to choose their schools, and giving schools the freedom and market incentives to make wise personnel decisions, will reward good schools and good teachers, providing more students with the high-quality education they deserve."
Inequality and the Right to Learn: Access to Qualified Teachers in California's Public Schools
Date CapturedTuesday September 05, 2006 06:46 PM
By Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University. "The article outlines the legal rationale for insisting on access to qualified teachers for all students, analyzes the reasons for the current shortfalls in California, and proposes a set of remedies based on research and policy outcomes elsewhere." Teachers College Record Volume 106 Number 10, 2004, p. 1936-1966. http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11677, Date Accessed: 9/5/2006 5:46:06 PM
The 38th Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools
Date CapturedTuesday August 22, 2006 10:47 AM
(September 2006) By LOWELL C. ROSE executive director emeritus of Phi Delta Kappa International and ALEC M. GALLUP, co-chairman, with George Gallup, Jr., of the Gallup Organization, Princeton, N.J. "In probing the public’s opinions of NCLB, the PDK/Gallup poll finds that there is widespread support for the law’s goals -- closing the achievement gap between African American and Latino students and their white peers and improving educational outcomes for all students -- but broad disagreement with its specific strategies. When asked whether testing students in only English and math, as currently required by NCLB, can give a fair picture of a school, 81% of the public say no. And 78% are worried that the law’s focus on these two subjects will mean less emphasis on other subjects. The poll finds that two-thirds of those surveyed oppose measuring school success by the percentage of students passing a single statewide test, while 81% prefer measuring the improvement that students make during the year."
Single-Sex Versus Coeducation Schooling: A Systematic Review
Date CapturedMonday August 21, 2006 05:07 PM
"This report deals primarily with single-sex education at the elementary and secondary levels. Research in the United States on the question of whether public single-sex education might be beneficial to males, females or a subset of either group (particularly disadvantaged youths) has been limited. However, because there has been a resurgence of single-sex schools in the public sector, it was deemed appropriate to conduct a systematic review of single-sex education research."U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development, Policy and Program Studies Service, Single-Sex Versus Secondary Schooling: A Systematic Review, Washington, D.C., 2005.
APA: ZERO TOLERANCE POLICIES ARE NOT AS EFFECTIVE AS THOUGHT IN REDUCING VIOLENCE AND PROMOTING LEARNING IN SCHOOL (READ REPORT)
Date CapturedThursday August 10, 2006 01:10 PM
APA Task Force on Zero Tolerance reports, "By changing the relationship of education and juvenile justice, zero tolerance may shift the locus of discipline from relatively inexpensive actions in the school setting to the highly costly processes of arrest and incarceration. In so doing, zero tolerance policies have created unintended consequences for students, families, and communities." Task Force on Zero Tolerance: Chair: Cecil R. Reynolds, PhD, Texas A&M University; Jane Conoley, EdD, University of California at Santa Barbara; Enedina Garcia-Vazquez, PhD, New Mexico State University; Sandra Graham, PhD, University of California at Los Angeles; Peter Sheras, PhD, University of Virginia; and Russell Skiba, PhD, Indiana University.
Reality Check 2006: Issue No. 2 - How Black and Hispanic Families Rate Their Schools
Date CapturedTuesday May 30, 2006 06:05 PM
by Jean Johnson, Ana Maria Arumi and Amber Ott. The second in a series of Reality Check reports finds that black and Hispanic students are more likely than their white counterparts to report "very serious" problems in their schools on both academic and social dimensions. Three in 10 black youngsters report very serious levels of disruption and unrest in their schools – not just "somewhat serious," but "very serious." Black students are twice as likely as white students to say that schools not getting enough money is a very serious problem in their community. Nearly a third of black and Hispanic youngsters say that "only some" or "very few" of their teachers give students extra help when they fall behind, compared with one in five white students.
Study: Welfare Clock Should Stop for College Moms
Date CapturedThursday April 20, 2006 03:55 PM
Are We Really A Nation Online? Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Access to Technology & Consequences
Date CapturedMonday December 12, 2005 12:27 PM
Report for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights Education Fund: Robert W. Fairlie University of California, Santa Cruz and National Poverty Center, University of Michigan September 20, 2005.
The High Schools Hispanics Attend
Date CapturedWednesday December 07, 2005 12:27 AM
Pew Hispanic Center: Hispanic youths are much more likely than white or black youths to attend public high schools that are large, that have a high student-to-teacher ratio, and that have a substantial proportion of students who come from relatively poor families. Copyright 2001-2005 Pew Hispanic Center

Facilities

Educational Facilities Disaster and Crisis Management Guidebook
Date CapturedMonday August 20, 2007 07:26 PM
Florida Department of Education
GUIDELINES AND SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE PROCUREMENT AND USE OF ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE PRODUCTS FOR ALL PUBLIC AND NONPUBLIC ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN NEW YORK STATE
Date CapturedTuesday August 15, 2006 05:37 PM
New York State Office of General Services, August 4, 2006. These Guidelines and Specifications were developed in consultation with representatives of the Department of Environmental Conservation, Department of Health, Department of Labor and State Education Department, as directed by Chapter 584 of the Laws of New York, 2005.

Faculty

Act On Fact: Using Data to Improve Student Success.
Date CapturedMonday November 27, 2006 03:28 PM
CCSSE has released its 2006 National Report, Act On Fact: Using Data to Improve Student Success. This report asks the questions, "Which students are having a more productive college experience? For whom is our current practice working? Who, if anyone, might be left behind? What are the differences in various students’ experiences? Are certain practices mandatory for some students but not for others? Should they be required for all students? What practices are built into the classroom experience now? Should we incorporate more expectations, activities, or services into coursework?"
Changes in Staff Distribution and Salaries of Full-time Employees in Postsecondary Institutions:
Date CapturedThursday August 03, 2006 08:26 AM
This NCES study examines the changes that occurred between fall 1993 and fall 2003 in the distribution of staff and average salaries of all full-time staff— faculty, administrators, and support personnel—at postsecondary institutions. Li, X. (2006). Changes in Staff Distribution and Salaries of Full-time Employees in Postsecondary Institutions: 1993–2003 (NCES 2006-152). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
The Devaluing of Higher Education
Date CapturedMonday April 24, 2006 01:58 PM
The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2005-06. Faculty compensation data were collected, compiled, and tabulated by the AAUP Research Office

FERPA

OPT-OUT PROTECT KIDS
Date CapturedSunday December 30, 2012 03:21 PM
FERPA and the Cloud: What FERPA Can Learn from HIPAA
Date CapturedTuesday December 18, 2012 07:01 AM
SOLOVE: Parents need to look at what their schools are doing about student privacy and speak up, because the law isn’t protecting their children’s privacy. School officials who want to develop a more meaningful and robust protection of privacy should talk to government officials who are tasked with complying with HIPAA. They can learn a lot from studying HIPAA and following some of its requirements. Congress should remake FERPA more in the model of HIPAA. If Congress won’t act, state legislatures should pass better education privacy laws. Because FERPA does not provide adequate oversight and enforcement of cloud computing providers, schools must be especially aggressive and assume the responsibility. Otherwise, their students’ data will not be adequately protected. School officials shouldn’t assume that the law is providing regulation of cloud computing providers and that they need not worry. The law isn’t, so right now the schools need to be especially vigilant.
It's 3PM: Who's Watching Your Children?
Date CapturedWednesday December 12, 2012 05:48 PM
Parents concerned about their children's privacy should be aware of how easily personally identifiable information can be bought and sold by marketers as well as by identity thieves. FERPA was enacted in 1974 to protect the privacy of education records and directory information -- including name, address, phone number, date of birth, and e-mail address, among other personally identifiable information. Parents should be aware that under FERPA, directory information can be disclosed without parental consent. If you do not opt-out of directory information personal and identifiable information about your children may be public.
FERPA and the Cloud: Why FERPA Desperately Needs Reform
Date CapturedTuesday December 11, 2012 06:51 AM
SOLOVE: Parents should lobby Congress and their state legislatures to pass laws providing better protections of their children’s data. This is an issue that should be of great concern to parents since educational institutions possess a staggering amount of personal data about students, and this data can currently be outsourced to nearly any company anywhere – even to a cloud computing provider in the most totalitarian country in the world!
DECEMBER 2011 – REVISED FERPA REGULATIONS: AN OVERVIEW FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS
Date CapturedMonday November 12, 2012 11:00 AM
It is important for schools to have directory information policies, as schools may not do even mundane activities (such as publishing yearbooks or creating graduation programs) without having designated the items about the students contained in the publications as directory information. For example, without a directory information policy, FERPA would require schools to obtain consent for every student every time it wants to publish a yearbook. However, many schools have been forgoing designations of directory information, as they have concluded that such designations would put students at risk of becoming targets of marketing campaigns, the media, or even victims of criminal acts
Revealing New Truths About Our Nation's Schools
Date CapturedTuesday March 06, 2012 05:54 PM
CRDC makes public long-hidden data about which students are suspended, expelled, and arrested in school.
EPIC v US Department of Education
Date CapturedThursday March 01, 2012 09:08 AM
EPIC has filed a lawsuit under the Administrative Procedure Act against the Department of Education. EPIC's lawsuit argues that the agency's December 2011 regulations amending the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act exceed the agency's statutory authority, and are contrary to law. The agency issued the revised regulations despite the fact that “numerous commenters . . . believe the Department lacks the statutory authority to promulgate the proposed regulations."
December 2011 FERPA Regulations: Information Sharing Around Child Welfare and Education
Date CapturedThursday January 26, 2012 08:02 AM
The new rules offer expanded opportunities for state or local child welfare and education agencies to share information. However, given that these new regulations do not sufficiently eliminate the barriers to intersystem communication for children in care, we look forward to legislative changes to ensure that child welfare agencies can fulfill their duty to ensure that the educational needs of the children in their care are met.
NY Assembly bill A.8474 same as NY Senate bill S.2357B
Date CapturedMonday January 23, 2012 12:38 PM
Requires active parental consent to release personal and sensitive information (categorized as directory information under FERPA) about students. This bill passed the NY Senate 62-0 in the 2011 session. It has been sponsored & reintroduced in the Assembly by Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal & in the Senate by Sen. Suzi Oppenheimer for the 2012 legislative session.
APPENDIX A: FERPA Guidance for Reasonable Methods and Written Agreements
Date CapturedThursday January 05, 2012 05:57 PM
FERPA represents the floor for protecting [student] privacy, not the ceiling. PAGE A-5 Federal Register/Vol. 76, No. 232/Friday, December 2, 2011/Rules and Regulations.
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 99 in the Federal Register (76 FR 19726)
Date CapturedMonday December 05, 2011 11:20 AM
SUMMARY: The Secretary of Education (Secretary) amends the regulations implementing section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA), which is commonly referred to as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). These amendments are needed to ensure that the U.S. Department of Education (Department or we) continues to implement FERPA in a way that protects the privacy of education records while allowing for the effective use of data. Improved access to data will facilitate States’ ability to evaluate education programs, to ensure limited resources are invested effectively, to build upon what works and discard what does not, to increase accountability and transparency, and to contribute to a culture of innovation and continuous improvement in education.
Example of customized opt-out form
Date CapturedSunday September 04, 2011 07:45 PM
COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON FERPA DIRECTORY INFORMATION OPT-OUT FORM - note parents or college students have choices as to which information they want to share.
California AB.143
Date CapturedSaturday September 03, 2011 02:40 PM
INTRODUCED BY Assembly Member Fuentes; This bill would redefine directory information to no longer include a pupil's place of birth and to also include a pupil's e-mail address.
CA: State colleges, alumni groups reap $6.6M in credit card royalties
Date CapturedFriday September 02, 2011 08:29 PM
Erica Perez; Under the agreements, banks typically get exclusive rights to market credit cards to university students and alumni, and they pay royalties to the universities or related organizations based on the number of new credit card accounts opened.] Excerpt from source linked to entry: [university must give the bank mailing lists for alumni, faculty, staff, fans, ticket holders, donors, undergraduates and graduate students. The lists include postal addresses, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses.]
FTC CONSUMER ALERT: Protecting Your Child's Personal Information at School
Date CapturedFriday September 02, 2011 06:10 PM
[Ask your child's school about its directory information policy. Student directory information can include your child's name, address, date of birth, telephone number, email address, and photo. FERPA requires schools to notify parents and guardians about their school directory policy, and give you the right to opt-out of the release of directory information to third parties. It's best to put your request in writing and keep a copy for your files. If you don't opt-out, directory information may be available not only to the people in your child's class and school, but also to the general public.]
Addressing Emergencies on Campus June 2011
Date CapturedTuesday June 28, 2011 06:32 PM
United States Department of Education (USED) : Summary of two applicable Federal education laws administered by the Department of Education (Department): the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA), as amended. This Federal component is only one piece of what is necessary to consider in ensuring the safety of our Nation’s students, faculty, and school staff. A comprehensive and effective campus policy must incorporate all Federal and State policies regarding health and safety emergencies, education, student privacy, civil rights, and law enforcement, as well as specific local community needs.
Fordham CLIP Comments on FERPA NPRM May 23, 2011 Docket: ED-2011-OM-0002 1
Date CapturedWednesday June 22, 2011 10:24 PM
Fordham Professor of Law Joel Reidenberg: Proposed Amendments to the FERPA Regulations contradict Congressional Mandates; Impermissible expansion of “Authorized representative” proposed in §99.3; Problematic expansion of “directory information” proposed in §99.3; Impermissible expansion of the “audit and evaluation” provision proposed in § 99.35(a)(2); Questionable Enforcement proposed in §99.35 ;
New York Senate; S.2357-B
Date CapturedTuesday June 07, 2011 12:07 PM
This bill, sponsored by Sen. Oppenheimer, restricts the sale of student PII and requires affirmative consent for the release of sensitive information.
Education New York comments re Student Privacy submitted to FERPA NPRM - May 23, 2011
Date CapturedMonday May 23, 2011 09:22 PM
Document ID: ED-2011-OM-0002-0001: Family Educational Rights and Privacy. The proposed changes to FERPA do not adequately address the capacity of marketers and other commercial enterprises to capture, use, and re-sell student information. Even with privacy controls in place, it is also far too easy for individuals to get a hold of student information and use it for illegal purposes, including identity theft, child abduction in custody battles, and domestic violence. Few parents are aware, for example, that anyone can request -- and receive -- a student directory from a school. Data and information breaches occur every day in Pre-K-20 schools across the country, so that protecting student privacy has become a matter of plugging holes in a dyke rather than advancing a comprehensive policy that makes student privacy protection the priority.
U.S. Department of Education (USED) Safeguarding Student Privacy 
Date CapturedFriday April 08, 2011 06:38 PM
The use of data is vital to ensuring the best education for our children.  However, the benefits of using  student data must always be balanced with the need to protect students’ privacy rights.  Students and their  parents should expect that their personal information is safe, properly collected and maintained and that it is  used only for appropriate purposes and not improperly redisclosed.  It is imperative to protect students’  privacy to avoid discrimination, identity theft or other malicious and damaging criminal acts.  All education  data holders must act responsibly and be held accountable for safeguarding students’ personally identifiable  information – from practitioners of early learning to those developing systems across the education  continuum (P-20) and from schools to their contractors.  The need for articulated privacy protections and  data security continues to grow as Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems (SLDS) are built and more education  records are digitized and shared electronically.  As States develop and refine their information management  systems, it is critical that they ensure that student information continues to be protected and that students’  personally identifiable information is disclosed only for authorized purposes and under the circumstances  permitted by law.  All P-20 stakeholders should be involved in the development of these statewide systems  and protection policies.    
"What every school official should know about privacy"
Date CapturedThursday March 17, 2011 02:24 PM
Video of Daniel Solove on schools and privacy taped at Cornell University.
United States House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor Hearing on “How Data Can be Used to Inform Educational Outcomes” April 14, 2010
Date CapturedMonday March 14, 2011 07:36 PM
1. States are warehousing sensitive information about identifiable children. 2. The Fordham CLIP study documents that privacy protections are lacking and rules need to be developed and implemented to assure that children’s educational records are adequately protected. 3. As part of basic privacy standards, strong data security is necessary to minimize the risks of data invasions, scandals and melt-downs from centralized databases of children’s personal information. Statement of Joel R. Reidenberg, Professor of Law and Founding Academic Director Center on Law and Information Policy, Fordham University School of Law New York, NY
PAUL GAMMILL v U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Date CapturedMonday March 14, 2011 12:44 PM
Whistleblower Retaliation lawsuit filed by Gammill against USED for retaliation of sharing an illegal attempt to circumvent FERPA. Case Number: 1:2011cv00409; Filed: February 18, 2011; Court: District Of Columbia District Court; Office: Washington, DC Office; County: 88888; Presiding Judge: John D. Bates
The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting
Date CapturedFriday March 11, 2011 07:35 PM
FERPA does not preclude an institution’s compliance with the timely warning provision of the campus security regulations. FERPA recognizes that information can, in case of an emergency, be released without consent when needed to protect the health and safety of others. In addition, if institutions utilize information from the records of a campus law enforcement unit to issue a timely warning, FERPA is not implicated as those records are not protected by FERPA. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting, Washington, D.C., 2011.
FERPA and Social Media
Date CapturedThursday March 10, 2011 02:50 PM
When students are assigned to post information to public social media platforms outside of the university LMS, they should be informed that their material may be viewed by others. Students should not be required to release personal information on a public site. Instructor comments or grades on student material should not be made public. (Interestingly, grades given by other students on “peer-graded” work can be made public under FERPA). (ACE, 2008) While not clearly required by law, students under the age of 18 should get their parent’s consent to post public work. FERPA does not forbid instructors from using social media in the classroom, but common sense guidelines should be used to ensure the protection of students.
OHIO 3319.321 Confidentiality
Date CapturedThursday March 10, 2011 02:40 PM
Ohio Revised Code » Title [33] XXXIII EDUCATION (A) No person shall release, or permit access to, the directory information concerning any students attending a public school to any person or group for use in a profit-making plan or activity. Notwithstanding division (B)(4) of section 149.43 of the Revised Code, a person may require disclosure of the requestor’s identity or the intended use of the directory information concerning any students attending a public school to ascertain whether the directory information is for use in a profit-making plan or activity.
Data Quality Campaign Release of Data for Action 2010: DQC's State Analysis
Date CapturedMonday March 07, 2011 06:15 PM
On February 16, 2011 DQC discussed the results of its sixth annual state analysis Data for Action 2010, a powerful policymaking tool to drive education leaders to use data in decision making. Data for Action is a series of analyses on states’ ability to collect and use data to improve student success. It provides transparency about state progress and priority actions they need to take to collect and use longitudinal data to improve student success.
Basic Concepts and Definitions for Privacy and Confidentiality in Student Education Records
Date CapturedThursday March 03, 2011 01:21 PM
NCES 2011-601 This first brief discusses basic concepts and definitions that establish a common set of terms related to the protection of personally identifiable information, especially in education records.
Kindergarten Through 12 Grade Schools’ Collection and Use of Social Security Numbers (A-08-10-11057)
Date CapturedThursday December 23, 2010 09:53 AM
OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION - Despite the potential risks associated with using SSNs as primary student identifiers, many K-12 schools continue this practice. While we recognize that SSA cannot prohibit States or K-12 schools from collecting and using SSNs as student identifiers or for other purposes, we believe SSA can help reduce the threat of identity theft and SSN misuse by encouraging States and K-12 schools to reduce unnecessary collection of SSNs and improve protections and safeguards when collected.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Disclosure of Student Information Related to Emergencies and Disasters
Date CapturedThursday June 24, 2010 01:48 PM
The purpose of this guidance is to answer questions that have arisen about the sharing of personally identifiable information from students’ education records to outside parties when responding to emergencies, including natural or man-made disasters. Understanding how, what, and when information can be shared with outside parties is an important part of emergency preparedness.
Education and Workforce Data Connections: A Primer on States’ Status
Date CapturedWednesday April 14, 2010 06:16 PM
Data Quality Campaign - [States are currently working to connect education and workforce data, however, states are far from reaching the goal of having data systems that can link across the P-20/Workforce spectrum. To connect these education and workforce databases, states should engage a broad range of stakeholders to: 1. Prioritize, through broad-based stakeholder input, the critical policy questions to drive the development and use of longitudinal data systems. 2. Ensure data systems are interoperable within and across agencies and states by adopting or developing common data standards, definitions and language. 3. Protect personally identifiable information through governance policies and practices that promote the security of the information while allowing appropriate data access and sharing.]
Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO)
Date CapturedWednesday November 04, 2009 05:04 PM
The mission of the Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO) is to meet the needs of the Department's primary customers--learners of all ages--by effectively implementing two laws that seek to ensure student and parental rights in education: the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA).
South Dakota Superintendent Thinks Info Policy Will Pass Tonight
Date CapturedFriday October 30, 2009 05:37 PM
[Over the past month some parents have voiced their concerns to the school board over what they consider the selling of their children's contact information. Some say they don't want it to land in the wrong hands. Pam Homan says parents have known about the information policy for some time. "On the blue card as we call it parents have been informed of the FERPA requirement and whether or not they wish to have their child's name included or excluded from information." Revisions have been made to the proposed policy. Allowing parents more control over where the information is given. It will allow four categories that are: school publications, directory information, SD board of regents, and military recruiters.]
Plano ISD: Redefining the student directory
Date CapturedFriday October 30, 2009 10:30 AM
[If the changes are approved, Plano ISD couldn't, without consent from the parents, print a student's address, telephone number or e-mail address in any district publication. Some school districts -- and I'm not sure about Plano -- sell directory information to third parties as a money-making operation. Companies, such as Coca-Cola or Citi Bank, could buy the directories and market products to students.] NOTE: CHANGES WERE APPROVED
CHILDREN’S EDUCATIONAL RECORDS AND PRIVACY -- A STUDY OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL STATE REPORTING SYSTEMS -- October 28, 2009
Date CapturedFriday October 30, 2009 09:44 AM
[The Study reports on the results of a survey of all fifty states and finds that state educational databases across the country ignore key privacy protections for the nation's K-12 children. The Study finds that large amounts of personally identifiable data and sensitive personal information about children are stored by the state departments of education in electronic warehouses or for the states by third party vendors. These data warehouses typically lack adequate privacy protections, such as clear access and use restrictions and data retention policies, are often not compliant with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, and leave K-12 children unprotected from data misuse, improper data release, and data breaches. The Study provides recommendations for best practices and legislative reform to address these privacy problems.] Joel R. Reidenberg, Professor of Law and Founding Academic Director of CLIP Jamela Debelak, Esq., Executive Director of CLIP
Guidelines for Working with Law Enforcement Agencies
Date CapturedWednesday August 08, 2007 12:15 PM
By Michael Corn. EQ -- Volume 30 Number 3 2007. Checklist: * Create a policy to address the handling of all legal documents. * Form a team consisting of the security officer, legal counsel, and campus police. * Put campus legal counsel on your telephone speed-dial. * Meet with provost and/or chancellor to discuss law enforcement requests and investigations. * Review and document the salient features of your environment, including your institutional policies on data release and retention. * Understand your obligations with regard to confidentiality. * Discuss with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation whom you wish to inform of the investigation and why. * Work with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation to review what they are looking for and what will not be useful to them. * Develop internal procedures that control the materials and information of legally restricted information. Buy a safe for storing legal materials. * Work with law enforcement agents to better understand your environment and narrow the scope of information requests.

File Sharing

FERPA, COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS & DATA-SHARING
Date CapturedWednesday March 06, 2013 09:54 AM

Gender

Demographic and School Characteristics of Students Receiving Special Education in the Elementary Grades
Date CapturedFriday July 27, 2007 09:48 AM
Findings from the analysis indicate that for the cohort of students beginning kindergarten in 1998, specific learning disabilities and speech or language impairments were the most prevalent primary disabilities over the grades studied. The percentage of the student cohort receiving special education grew from 4.1 percent in kindergarten to 11.9 percent of students in fifth grade. The results also indicate that higher percentages of boys than girls and of poor students than nonpoor students received special education.
America’s High School Graduates: Results from the 2005 NAEP High School Transcript Study
Date CapturedFriday February 23, 2007 08:54 AM
NCES: Among those who took higher level mathematics and science courses, male graduates had higher NAEP scores than female graduates. Increased percentages of White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islander graduates completed at least a midlevel curriculum in 2005 compared with 1990. The GPAs of all four racial/ethnic groups also increased during this time. In 2005, both Black and Hispanic graduates were less likely than White graduates to have completed calculus or advanced science courses and to have higher GPAs.
Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment
Date CapturedThursday November 16, 2006 05:23 PM
This NCES report shows that graduation rates dropped systematically as the proportion of low-income students increased, even within the same Carnegie classification and selectivity levels. Variations by gender and race/ethnicity also were evident. Women graduated at higher rates than men, and in general, as the proportion of low-income students increased, so did the gap between female and male graduation rates. The gap in graduation rates between White and Black students and between White and Hispanic students, on the other hand, typically narrowed as the as the proportion of low-income students increased. Horn, L. (2006). Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment (NCES 2007-161). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
The Why Chromosome: How a Teacher's Gender Affects Boys and Girls
Date CapturedTuesday August 29, 2006 09:34 AM
Thomas Dee, associate professor in the Department of Economics at Swarthmore College and a faculty research fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research writes, "Adverse gender effects have an impact on both boys and girls, but that effect falls more heavily on the male half of the population in middle school, simply because most middleschool teachers are female."
Single-Sex Versus Coeducation Schooling: A Systematic Review
Date CapturedMonday August 21, 2006 05:07 PM
"This report deals primarily with single-sex education at the elementary and secondary levels. Research in the United States on the question of whether public single-sex education might be beneficial to males, females or a subset of either group (particularly disadvantaged youths) has been limited. However, because there has been a resurgence of single-sex schools in the public sector, it was deemed appropriate to conduct a systematic review of single-sex education research."U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development, Policy and Program Studies Service, Single-Sex Versus Secondary Schooling: A Systematic Review, Washington, D.C., 2005.
Popular single-gender classes at Iowa school being scrutinized by state
Date CapturedTuesday August 08, 2006 09:56 PM
The Courier, "A recent report issued by the Iowa Department of Education stated that the single-gender classrooms at the Walter Cunningham School for Excellence are in violation of federal and state civil rights laws that require school boards to take steps to integrate students on the basis of gender."
Differences in Actual and Perceived Online Skills: The Role of Gender
Date CapturedSunday July 02, 2006 07:27 PM
Differences in Actual and Perceived Online Skills: The Role of Gender by Eszter Hargittai and Steven Shafer 2006. Social Science Quarterly. 87(2):432-448. June. The literature on gender and technology use finds that women and men differ significantly in their attitudes toward their technological abilities. Concurrently, existing work on science and math abilities of students suggests that such perceived differences do not always translate into actual disparities. There has been little work exploring gender differences with respect to Internet use ability, especially based on a diverse sample of adult users. Researcher uses new data on Web-use skill to test empirically whether there are differences in men's and women's abilities to navigate online content. Findings suggest that men and women do not differ greatly in their online abilities. However, study finds that women's self-assessed skill is significantly lower than that of men. We discuss the implications of these findings for social inequality with respect to Internet use.
The Truth About Boys and Girls
Date CapturedMonday June 26, 2006 08:40 AM
By Sara Mead, Education Sector. On many measures American boys are achieving more than ever, but girls have improved their performance even faster. A careful look at the evidence shows the boy crisis hype is overblown and benefits neither boys nor girls.

Governance

Implementing Graduation Counts: State Progress to Date
Date CapturedSunday August 13, 2006 09:52 PM
NGA Issue Brief written by Bridget Curran, Education Division, National Governors Association. (08/07/2006). "In 2005 governors of all 50 states signed the Graduation Counts Compact and made an unprecedented commitment to a common method for calculating each state's high school graduation rate. In addition to agreeing to a common formula for calculating the graduation rate, the governors committed to leading efforts to improve state data collection, reporting, and analysis; reporting additional indicators of outcomes for students; and reporting annually on their progress toward improved high school graduation, completion, and dropout data."

Graduation

The Return on Investment for Improving California's High School Graduation Rate
Date CapturedFriday August 24, 2007 04:44 PM
Belfield, C. and Levin, H., "We review a large range of educational investments that might ensure more students graduate from high school in California. We identify educational interventions for which there is reasonably solid evidence of their efficacy to raise the rate of high school graduation, those for which there is promise, and those for which we have no relevant information. For each of these interventions we calculate the costs to the taxpayer of delivering the intervention. We calculate the delivery costs and the cost of producing one extra graduate. We then compare these costs to the economic benefits to the taxpayer and to the overall citizenry of California from each additional high school graduate. Under most scenarios, the economic benefits are substantially greater than the costs. However, this conclusion is sensitive to the funding source: federal governments gain significantly more from education than state and local governments, even as the latter are primarily responsible for funding."
The Economic Losses from High School Dropouts in California
Date CapturedFriday August 24, 2007 07:47 AM
Belfield, C. and Levin, H. "This paper calculates the fiscal and social burdens from high school dropouts in California. We map educational attainment in California for current cohorts of students and young adults. This reveals in stark terms the low levels of educational attainment across the state. Next, the amount of government spending in California is catalogued; this shows how much is spent on various services and by which levels of government. Our main focus is on the economic consequences of inadequate education on earnings, on tax revenues, and on spending on health, crime, and welfare (net of the resources required to provide additional education). For each of these four domains the effect of education has been assessed statistically. This effect is then multiplied by the respective economic burden from each cohort of 20-year olds who fail to graduate in order to get an overall total cost. Using a consistent accounting framework, these costs generate a figure of what is being lost by failing to ensure that all students graduate from high school. The economic magnitudes are substantial."
Graduation Matters: Improving Accountability for High School Graduation
Date CapturedThursday August 02, 2007 08:26 AM
By Daria Hall, Assistant Director for K-12 Policy at The Education Trust. "The Education Trust report provides recommendations for policy changes at both the federal and state levels, including the following priorities for NCLB reauthorization: * Crafting meaningful graduation-rate accountability provisions in the law and providing high schools with a greater share of the federal investment in education so they have more resources to meet ambitious improvement goals; * Targeting federal investments to improve high school curriculum and assessments; and *Better directing funds and interventions toward the lowest performing schools to ensure that high-poverty and high-minority schools get their fair share of the tools they need to be successful – strong teachers, high standards and high-quality curriculum and assessments."
Dropout Rates in the United States: 2005
Date CapturedThursday June 28, 2007 09:02 PM
This report builds upon a series of National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988. It presents estimates of rates for 2005, and provides data about trends in dropout and completion rates over the last three decades (1972-2005), including characteristics of dropouts and completers in these years. Among other findings, the report shows that in students living in low-income families were approximately six times more likely to drop out of high school between 2004 and 2005 than of their peers from high-income families. Laird, J., DeBell, M., Kienzl, G., and Chapman, C. (2007). Dropout Rates in the United States: 2005 (NCES 2007- 059). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved June 28, 2007 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Public Elementary and Secondary School Student Enrollment, High School Completions, and Staff From the Common Core of Data: School Year 2005-06
Date CapturedFriday June 08, 2007 10:43 AM
This report presents 2005-06 school year information at the national and state level on student enrollment by grade, numbers of teachers and other education staff, numbers of high school completers, and the averaged freshman graduaution rate for 2004-05.
Demilitarizing What the Pentagon Knows About Developing Young People: A New Paradigm for Educating Students Who Are Struggling in School and in Life
Date CapturedFriday June 01, 2007 12:53 PM
CCF Working Paper, May 2007, Hugh B. Price, Senior Fellow, Economic Studies. "Millions of adolescents are marginalized academically and destined for oblivion in the twenty-first century economy. They barely, if at all, will be able to uphold their obligations as citizens and providers. The U.S. military figured out how to nurture and unleash the potential of young people like these generations ago. By demilitarizing and deploying what the Pentagon knows about educating and developing aimless young people, these troubled and troublesome young Americans can be transformed into a valued social and economic asset to our nation."
Course Credit Accrual and Dropping Out of High School
Date CapturedThursday April 26, 2007 08:05 PM
By Gillian Hampden-Thompson (AIR), Gregory Kienzl (AIR), Bruce Daniel (KForce) and Akemi Kinukawa (Child Trends). The findings from the analysis indicate that high school dropouts earn fewer credits than do on-time graduates within each academic year, and the gap in course credits accrued between dropouts and on-time graduates increased across academic years. Differences were also observed in the course credit accrual of dropouts and on-time graduates by selected subjects (e.g., mathematics, science, and English). In addition, the gap in the cumulative number of course credits accrued between on-time graduates and dropouts grew more pronounced over time, and the disparity in cumulative course credits was most evident in the final academic year in which they earned any course credits.
Educating Children in Foster Care: The McKinney-Vento and No Child Left Behind Acts
Date CapturedWednesday April 25, 2007 09:44 AM
Casey Family Programs write, "The recommendations, included as part of a comprehensive report released at a congressional briefing, deal with the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act and the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. The recommendations are: Improve school stability by ensuring that the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act applies to all children in out-of-home care, and increase funding for the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act to a level that covers all eligible children. Ensure that children and youth in foster care have access to education-related support services by making them automatically eligible for Title I, Part A services and including them in the set-aside that exists for homeless children. Increase funding for school counselors and mental health services."
Dropout Rates in the United States: 2004
Date CapturedThursday December 07, 2006 10:17 AM
This report builds upon a series of National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988. It presents estimates of rates for 2004, and provides data about trends in dropout and completion rates over the last three decades (1972–2004), including characteristics of dropouts and completers in these years. Among other findings, the report shows that in students living in low-income families were approximately four times more likely to drop out of high school between 2003 and 2004 than were their peers from high-income families. Focusing on indicators of on-time graduation from public high schools, the averaged freshman graduation rate for the 3 most recent years for which data are available shows an increase from 72.6 percent for 2001–02 to 73.9 percent for 2002–03 to 74.3 percent for 2003–04. Laird, J., DeBell, M., and Chapman, C. (2006). Dropout Rates in the United States: 2004 (NCES 2007-024). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved December 7, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment
Date CapturedThursday November 16, 2006 05:23 PM
This NCES report shows that graduation rates dropped systematically as the proportion of low-income students increased, even within the same Carnegie classification and selectivity levels. Variations by gender and race/ethnicity also were evident. Women graduated at higher rates than men, and in general, as the proportion of low-income students increased, so did the gap between female and male graduation rates. The gap in graduation rates between White and Black students and between White and Hispanic students, on the other hand, typically narrowed as the as the proportion of low-income students increased. Horn, L. (2006). Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment (NCES 2007-161). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Economic Outcomes of High School Completers and Noncompleters 8 Years Later
Date CapturedThursday October 12, 2006 06:49 PM
NCES: The findings suggest that individuals who completed high school within 6 years generally had more favorable economic outcomes than their counterparts who completed high school later or not at all. However, differences in economic outcomes were most prominent between males and females even after controlling for the timing and type of high school credential earned.
The Invisible Face of CFE: New York’s Small City School Districts in Crisis
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 07:47 AM
Prepared by Robert Biggerstaff, New York State Association of Small City School Districts' and written by Charles A. Winters, former Newburgh administrator, study concludes students in small New York state urban settings suffer as much or more than children in New York City from chronic underfunding. Small-city districts have comparable poverty levels, draw from a less wealthy tax base and students fail just as much, if not more, than New York City children.
Projections of Education Statistics to 2015
Date CapturedThursday September 14, 2006 11:31 AM
This NCES publication provides projections for key education statistics on enrollment, graduates, teachers, and expenditures in elementary and secondary schools, and enrollment, earned degrees conferred, and current-fund expenditures of degree-granting institutions. For the Nation, the tables, figures, and text contain data on enrollment, teachers, graduates, and expenditures for the past 14 years and projections to the year 2015. For the 50 States and the District of Columbia, the tables, figures, and text contain data on projections of public elementary and secondary enrollment and public high school graduates to the year 2015. In addition, the report includes a methodology section describing models and assumptions used to develop national and state-level projections. Hussar. W.J., and Bailey, T.M. (2006). Projections of Education Statistics to 2015 (NCES 2006-084). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
State High School Exit Exams: A Challenging Year
Date CapturedThursday August 17, 2006 07:48 AM
Authors: Nancy Kober, Dalia Zabala, Naomi Chudowsky, Victor Chudowsky, Keith Gayler, and Jennifer McMurrer. Center on Education Policy report finds, "... no state legislature adopted a new exit exam requirement in 2006 although Maryland, Washington, and Oklahoma are following through on plans set earlier to phase in exit exams. Of the four states scheduled to begin withholding diplomas based on exam performance this year, Arizona and California did so only after facing significant legal challenges, while Utah backed down from its earlier plans to do so. Idaho began withholding diplomas in 2006 with less conflict and controversy than other states experienced. Meanwhile, most of the 25 states that currently require or are phasing in exit exams have moved to create greater flexibility and support to help struggling students meet the exam requirements."
Implementing Graduation Counts: State Progress to Date
Date CapturedSunday August 13, 2006 09:52 PM
NGA Issue Brief written by Bridget Curran, Education Division, National Governors Association. (08/07/2006). "In 2005 governors of all 50 states signed the Graduation Counts Compact and made an unprecedented commitment to a common method for calculating each state's high school graduation rate. In addition to agreeing to a common formula for calculating the graduation rate, the governors committed to leading efforts to improve state data collection, reporting, and analysis; reporting additional indicators of outcomes for students; and reporting annually on their progress toward improved high school graduation, completion, and dropout data."
The Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate for Public High Schools From the Common Core of Data: School Years 2002–03 and 2003-04
Date CapturedMonday July 10, 2006 09:57 AM
Comparing the averaged freshman graduation rate among public school students in the class of 2002-03 to that of 2003-04 in each of the 48 reporting states and the District of Columbia, 32 states and the District of Columbia experienced increases in the rate, 1 state experienced no change, and 15 states experienced declines in the rate over this 2-year period. Note, a previous version of this report included unstable estimates for Department of Defense schools, which have been removed.
New York State's Dual Crises: Low Graduation Rates and Rising School Taxes
Date CapturedFriday May 19, 2006 09:10 AM
Inadequate state aid to public schools is jeapordizing the future of New York State's two million public school children and driving up local property taxes, according to a new report released today by AQE and the Public Policy and Education Fund.
Rethinking High School Graduation Rates and Trends
Date CapturedWednesday May 03, 2006 06:36 PM
Listen to debate between Economic Policy Institute President Lawrence Mishel (co-author of Rethinking High School Graduation Rates and Trends) and Manhattan Institute senior fellow Jay P. Greene, on their differing analyses of graduation rates nationwide. The Center on Education Policy (CEP) hosted the debate on Thursday, April 27, 2006, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.
New Graduation Rate Report by Jay P. Greene and Marcus A. Winters
Date CapturedWednesday April 19, 2006 09:05 AM
This study uses a widely respected method to calculate public high school graduation rates for the nation, for each state, and for the 100 largest school districts in the United States. This study calculates graduation rates overall, by race, and by gender, using the most recent available data (the class of 2003).
Leaving Boys Behind: Public High School
Date CapturedWednesday April 19, 2006 09:03 AM
by Manhattan Institute Senior Fellows Jay P. Greene and Marcus A. Winters. Civic Report 48. April 2006
The Adult Lives of At-Risk Students: The Roles of Attainment and Engagement in High School
Date CapturedFriday April 14, 2006 10:03 AM
Jeremy D. Finn, State University of New York at Buffalo; Jeffrey Owings, Project Officer National Center for Education Statistics. This March 2006 NCES report examines heterogeneity in young adult outcomes among students at risk for school failure due to low socioeconomic status (SES). It addresses the question: “Among students at risk due to status characteristics, what are the relationships of high school engagement and attainments with post-high school outcomes?” Two sets of outcomes are considered: entry and persistence in postsecondary education, and employment and income as a young adult.

Health

The Oral Health of Children: A Portrait of States and the Nation, 2005
Date CapturedSaturday July 22, 2006 01:13 PM
The National Survey of Children’s Health provides information on the health and well-being of children in the 50 States and the District of Columbia (D.C.). Survey findings for NEW YORK including the percentage of children whose teeth are reported to be in excellent or good condition and the percentage of children who received a preventive dental care visit in the past year are presented on this site. These indicators are also shown by children’s age, family income, race and ethnicity, and sex. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The National Survey of Children's Health 2003. Rockville, Maryland: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2005.
The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System -- United States 2005
Date CapturedThursday June 22, 2006 08:43 AM
This Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study monitors six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among youth and young adults, including behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections; unhealthy dietary behaviors; and physical inactivity. In addition, the YRBSS monitors general health status and the prevalence of overweight and asthma. YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by CDC and state and local school-based surveys conducted by state and local education and health agencies.
School Foods Report Card
Date CapturedTuesday June 20, 2006 04:29 PM
To determine the progress states have made in improving the nutritional quality of school foods, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) evaluated the school nutrition policies of all 50 states and the District of Columbia regarding foods and beverages sold outside of the school meal programs through vending machines, a la carte (i.e., foods sold individually in the cafeteria), school stores, and fundraisers. Each state policy was graded based on five key considerations: 1) beverage nutrition standards; 2) food nutrition standards; 3) grade level(s) to which policies apply; 4) time during the school day to which policies apply; and 5) location(s) on campus to which policies apply.
Shape of the Nation - - Status of Physical Education
Date CapturedTuesday May 02, 2006 08:03 PM
Read the Shape of the Nation Report -- information about the status of physical education in each state and the District of Columbia in the following areas: time requirements, exemptions/waivers and substitutions, class size, standards, curriculum and instruction, student assessment, teacher certification.
SCAA: Children's Oral Health
Date CapturedFriday December 02, 2005 11:45 AM

Health and Education

National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XII: Teens and Parents (STUDY)
Date CapturedFriday August 17, 2007 09:31 AM
Study finds, "CASA’s unprecedented in-depth survey of drugs in schools shows that eight out of 10 high school students (80 percent) and more than four out of 10 middle school students (44 percent) have personally witnessed: • illegal drugs used on the grounds of their schools; • illegal drugs sold on the grounds of their schools; • students keeping illegal drugs at school, either on them or in their lockers; • students high on drugs at school; and/or • students drunk at school. This means that for 16 million teens (11 million high schoolers; five million middle schoolers) drug dealing and use, drug possession, and drug or alcohol intoxication are common features of school life."
The State Education Department and the State Health Department memo and information pamphlet to underscore the potential magnitude of a pandemic on the education community and emphasize the need for preparedness
Date CapturedTuesday August 15, 2006 07:21 PM
In a severe pandemic, all employers—including schools —will experience a dramatic reduction in their workforce, as one-in-four employees becomes ill and others remain home to care for sick family members. Many schools may close because of excessive student and staff absenteeism. Available evidence indicates that school closure (perhaps as long as 12 weeks in duration) early in a pandemic may significantly reduce influenza transmission. Health officials will notify school authorities when conditions warrant school closure. In certain instances, school facilities may be asked to function as Points of Dispensing (PODs) for essential medications. We strongly encourage you to work closely with your county/city health department and emergency management officials to increase your district’s pandemic preparedness in the upcoming school year. To assist you in your planning process, we have prepared a pandemic information packet specifically designed for the education community.
America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2005
Date CapturedThursday July 13, 2006 10:50 PM
America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2005 is a biennial report to the Nation on the condition of children in America. Nine contextual measures describe the changing population, family, and environmental context in which children are living, and 25 indicators depict the well-being of children in the areas of economic security, health, behavior and social environment, and education. Racial categories were expanded from four racial groups (American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian, Black, and White) to five racial groups (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and White). Expansion of the racial categories and the introduction of multiple race categories—have a direct impact on many of the indicators presented in this report, particularly with respect to trend analyses. Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics Highlights. DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Children's Health Series: Children's Nutrition
Date CapturedFriday June 16, 2006 11:22 PM
A four-page white paper, the second in a series on children's health produced by SCAA through its Children's Policy Agenda, to explore programs and policy interventions that support the development of healthy children in New York State.

Higher Education

Online Public Policy Master’s Degree Programs
Date CapturedTuesday August 23, 2011 05:29 PM
The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting
Date CapturedFriday March 11, 2011 07:35 PM
FERPA does not preclude an institution’s compliance with the timely warning provision of the campus security regulations. FERPA recognizes that information can, in case of an emergency, be released without consent when needed to protect the health and safety of others. In addition, if institutions utilize information from the records of a campus law enforcement unit to issue a timely warning, FERPA is not implicated as those records are not protected by FERPA. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting, Washington, D.C., 2011.
Persistence and Attainment of 2003-04 Beginning Postsecondary Students: After Three Years
Date CapturedMonday August 20, 2007 02:42 PM
Findings showed that among the beginning students who were recent (2003) high school graduates, enrolled full time in the fall of 2003, and had bachelor’s degree plans, 70 percent were still enrolled at their first institution without a degree, 4 percent had attained a degree or certificate at their first institution, and 20 percent had transferred elsewhere without a degree by June 2006. Berkner, L., He, S., Mason, M., and Wheeless, S. (2007). Persistence and Attainment of 2003–04 Beginning Postsecondary Students: After Three Years (NCES 2007-169). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC. Retrieved August 20, 2007 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Working To Learn, Learning to Work: Unlocking the Potential of New York's Adult College Students
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 07:36 AM
Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy (SCAA) and the Center for an Urban Future (CUF) study, "Specific recommendations include: * Provide financial aid to part-time students in their first year. In 2006, the New York State Legislature took the first step towards assisting working adults by establishing a 'part-time TAP' program. However, New York should abolish the pointless requirement that students study full-time in the first year to qualify for part-time TAP. * Abolish discriminatory TAP benefits and income thresholds for unmarried childless adults, so that they can receive the same benefits at the same income thresholds as all other students. * Abolish all previous financial aid schedules and get rid of the 'don’t come back' rule, which ties students who leave college and return later to the income and benefit schedule in effect when they first entered college. Since schedules are improved every few years, older schedules are considerably less generous than current ones. * Create a remedial education financing program outside of TAP, so that students can enhance their opportunity for academic success while preserving TAP eligibility for creditworthy classes."
Cuomo details corruption in student loan industry
Date CapturedThursday March 15, 2007 10:43 PM
AP Mark Johnson reports, "Colleges across the country are taking kickbacks from student loan companies and reaping other benefits while making it harder for students to get better deals on their loans, Attorney General Andrew Cuomo charged Thursday. Cuomo said an investigation he began last month into the $85 billion student loan industry found numerous arrangements made to benefit schools and lenders over the students. Cuomo said he notified more than 400 colleges and universities nationwide, including all in New York State, to end such deceptive practices. Cuomo said he is actively investigating at least 100 schools. Cuomo would not divulge which schools were being investigated, but they include some Ivy League institutions."
Academic Bill of Rights is a no go at Plattsburgh State
Date CapturedMonday February 26, 2007 08:00 AM
Press Republican reports, "Author and right-wing activist David Horowitz introduced the Academic Bill of Rights in 2001 as an attempt to eliminate perceived liberal bias on college campuses. Proponents say it aims to prevent a professor from sitting in class and telling students that, for example, President Bush is evil and the Iraq war is only about oil."
SUNY New Paltz president has high hopes for education friendly governor
Date CapturedTuesday January 09, 2007 07:56 AM
Mid-Hudson News reports, "Poskanzer’s [SUNY New Paltz President] message to the new governor would be one of partnership in moving the state forward."
Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Fall 2005 and Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2004-05
Date CapturedWednesday December 27, 2006 10:37 AM
This First Look presents findings from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) fall 2005 data collection, which included two survey components: Institutional Characteristics for the 2005-06 academic year, and Completions covering the period July 1, 2004, through June 30, 2005. These data were collected through the IPEDS web-based data collection system. Knapp, L.G., Kelly-Reid, J.E., Whitmore, R.W., and Miller, E. (2006). Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Fall 2005 and Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2004-05 (NCES 2007-167). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved December 27, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment
Date CapturedThursday November 16, 2006 05:23 PM
This NCES report shows that graduation rates dropped systematically as the proportion of low-income students increased, even within the same Carnegie classification and selectivity levels. Variations by gender and race/ethnicity also were evident. Women graduated at higher rates than men, and in general, as the proportion of low-income students increased, so did the gap between female and male graduation rates. The gap in graduation rates between White and Black students and between White and Hispanic students, on the other hand, typically narrowed as the as the proportion of low-income students increased. Horn, L. (2006). Placing College Graduation Rates in Context: How 4-Year College Graduation Rates Vary With Selectivity and the Size of Low-Income Enrollment (NCES 2007-161). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Academic Libraries: 2004
Date CapturedTuesday November 14, 2006 05:53 PM
The selected findings and tables in this NCES report, based on the 2004 Academic Libraries Survey, summarize services, staff, collections, and expenditures of academic libraries in degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The report includes a number of key findings: During fiscal year (FY) 2004, there were 155.1 million circulation transactions from academic libraries’ general collection. During a typical week in the fall of 2004, 1.4 million academic library reference transactions were conducted, including computer searches. The nation’s 3,700 academic libraries held 982.6 million books; serial backfiles; and other paper materials, including government documents at the end of FY 2004. Academic libraries spent $2.2 billion on information resources during FY 2004. Holton, B., Vaden, K., and O’Shea P. (2006). Academic Libraries: 2004. (NCES 2007-301). U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved November 14, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Institutional Policies and Practices Regarding Postsecondary Faculty: Fall 2003
Date CapturedTuesday November 07, 2006 12:32 PM
This NCES report describes recent hiring and retirement patterns as well as tenure-related changes and actions taken by public and private not-for-profit postsecondary institutions that offered an associate’s or higher degree in fall 2003 and participated in federal Title IV student aid programs. Nevill, S.C., and Bradburn, E.M. (2006). Institutional Policies and Practices Regarding Postsecondary Faculty: Fall 2003 (NCES 2007-157). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved November 7, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
The Second-Century Imperatives — Presidential Leadership and Institutional Accountability,”
Date CapturedMonday October 30, 2006 05:55 PM
NCAA REPORT FROM THE PRESIDENTIAL TASK FORCE ON THE FUTURE OF DIVISION I INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: "The Task Force has developed a series of 'dashboard indicators' that can be customized for each campus and that will allow comparisons with specific peer groups. The indicators will show where each program is compared to the norm.The goal is to moderate the growth of athletics budgets. How this is done will vary from campus to campus, but that it must be done on most campuses is the consensus analysis of the Task Force. The reality for effective reform of spending and revenue-generating behaviors for college sports is this: Each college and university must hold itself accountable for exercising its independent will as an institution of higher education. And it will do that best through well-informed, value-driven presidential leadership."
2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04): Undergraduate Financial Aid Estimates for 12 States: 2003–04
Date CapturedTuesday October 24, 2006 02:28 PM
In addition to providing national estimates, the NPSAS:04 survey was designed to provide representative samples of undergraduates in public 2-year, public 4-year, and private not-for-profit 4-year institutions in 12 states: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Tennessee. Prior NPSAS studies have not been representative at the state level. For the in-state undergraduates in each of these 12 selected states, the tables in this E.D. TAB show the average tuition and fees and total price of attendance, the percentages of undergraduates receiving various types of financial aid and the average amounts received, the average net price of attendance after financial aid, average financial need and remaining need after financial aid, cumulative student loan amounts, earnings from work while enrolled, and other aspects of financing an undergraduate education. Berkner, L., and Wei, C.C. (2006). 2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04): Undergraduate Financial Aid Estimates for 12 States: 2003–04 (NCES 2006-158). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved October 24, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: 2003–04 With a Special Analysis of the Net Price of Attendance and Federal Education Tax Benefits Statistical Analysis Report
Date CapturedWednesday August 23, 2006 03:35 PM
This NCES report provides detailed information about undergraduate tuition and total price of attendance at various types of institutions, the percentage of students receiving various types of financial aid, and the average amounts that they received. Berkner, L., and Wei, C.C. (2006). Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: 2003–04, With a Special Analysis of the Net Price of Attendance and Federal Education Tax Benefits (NCES 2006-186). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Changes in Staff Distribution and Salaries of Full-time Employees in Postsecondary Institutions:
Date CapturedThursday August 03, 2006 08:26 AM
This NCES study examines the changes that occurred between fall 1993 and fall 2003 in the distribution of staff and average salaries of all full-time staff— faculty, administrators, and support personnel—at postsecondary institutions. Li, X. (2006). Changes in Staff Distribution and Salaries of Full-time Employees in Postsecondary Institutions: 1993–2003 (NCES 2006-152). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
New York City Independent Budget Office Fiscal Brief, July 2006
Date CapturedTuesday August 01, 2006 07:27 AM
By Paul Lopatto. Study finds, "THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK, commonly known as CUNY, is the largest urban public university system in the country, with approximately 450,000 students. Until the city’s fiscal crisis in the 1970s, CUNY charged no tuition. But even with the addition of tuition revenue, CUNY has faced ongoing challenges to its operating budget. CUNY officials say these challenges have hampered their ability to expand and improve the university’s educational programs.IBO’s review of CUNY funding since 1989 finds that the university system has become increasingly reliant on tuition revenue even as it faces year-to-year uncertainty in the sources of its funding and costs to its students."
The Importance of Policies in E-Learning Instruction
Date CapturedSaturday July 29, 2006 10:11 PM
By Shirley Waterhouse and Rodney O. Rogers. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, Volume 27 Number 3 2004. Authors discuss E-learning policies inlcuding policies in the syllabus, student privacy, e-mail policies, software standards policies, assignment policies, technical help policies, student code of conduct and intellectual property rights policies. Adapted from a chapter in The Power of Elearning: The Essential Guide to Teaching in the Digital Age by Shirley Waterhouse Boston, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon, October 2004.
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) and Libraries
Date CapturedThursday July 20, 2006 08:56 PM
American Library Association -- Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) policy brief explains, " the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act or “CALEA” and how it relates to our Nation’s libraries. This is an important issue because it may impact library budgets in the very near future, require certain technology expenditures and impose administrative burdens on library personnel to administer certain security requirements under the law."
The Postsecondary Educational Experiences of High School Career and Technical Education Concentrators: Selected Results From the NELS:88/2000 Postsecondary Education Transcript Study
Date CapturedThursday July 20, 2006 10:19 AM
This NCES report presents information on the postsecondary educational experiences of students from the high school class of 1992 who concentrated in career and technical education (CTE) while in high school, including their postsecondary enrollment, coursetaking, and degree attainment patterns. The report also describes the extent to which high school CTE concentrators pursued the same field at the postsecondary level.
Dealing With Debt: 1992-93 Bachelor’s Degree Recipients 10 Years Later
Date CapturedWednesday July 05, 2006 10:51 AM
Using data from the 1993–2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Study (B&B:93/03), this NCES report describes the borrowing patterns of 1992–93 bachelor’s degree recipients and examines the repayment of undergraduate Stafford loans for those who had no additional degree enrollment.
The Toolbox Revisited; Paths to Degree Completion from High School Through College
Date CapturedSaturday June 10, 2006 08:03 PM
U.S. Department of Education. The Toolbox Revisited is a data essay that follows a nationally representative cohort of students from high school into postsecondary education, and asks what aspects of their formal schooling contribute to completing a bachelor's degree by their mid-20s. The universe of students is confined to those who attended a four-year college at any time, thus including students who started out in other types of institutions, particularly community colleges
Holding Colleges and Universities Accountable for Meeting State Needs
Date CapturedSaturday June 10, 2006 09:57 AM
By Alicia A. Diaz, Joan Lord and Joseph L. Marks. This report, a part of the Challenge to Lead education goals series, looks at states' annual reports for higher education accountability and recommends that states develop public agendas for higher education. It also describes states' progress on key indicators: higher education graduation rates, faculty salaries, and science and research funding. SREB states have improved, but work remains to be done.
Preparing the Health Workforce
Date CapturedFriday May 19, 2006 05:36 PM
By Eleanor Schiff. A healthy nation depends on an adequate supply of well-educated and well-trained health professionals. As the demographics of the U.S. change with the baby-boom generation beginning to retire and the increasing cultural diversification of our society, the need for a stable or growing number of health professionals and a diverse workforce reflective of our population is increasingly important
Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students: A Joint Responsibility Between K-12 and Postsecondary Education
Date CapturedFriday May 19, 2006 05:26 PM
Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students: A Joint Responsibility Between K-12 and Postsecondary Education—Michael W. Kirst and Andrea Venezia
The Toolbox Revisited: Paths to Degree Completion from High School Through College
Date CapturedWednesday February 15, 2006 12:05 PM
Adelman, C., US Dept of Education, 2006. The Toolbox Revisited is a data essay that follows a nationally representative cohort of students from high school into postsecondary education, and asks what aspects of their formal schooling contribute to completing a bachelor's degree by their mid-20s.
A Transparent Approach to Higher Education Accountability
Date CapturedFriday December 09, 2005 06:59 PM
Developed and Implemented by The University of Texas System (presented at A National Dialogue:The Secretary of Education's Commission on the Future of Higher Education Second Meeting—Nashville, TN. December 8-9, 2005)

Home Schooling

Trends in the Use of School Choice: 1993 to 2003
Date CapturedTuesday November 28, 2006 10:27 AM
"This NCES report uses data from the National Household Surveys Program (NHES) to present trends that focus on the use of and users of public schools (assigned and chosen), private schools (church- and non church-related), and homeschoolers between 1993 and 2003. The percentage of students enrolled in their assigned public school decreased from 80 percent to 74 percent between 1993 and 2003, while this decrease was nearly offset by an increase in chosen public school enrollment from 11 to 15 percent between 1993 and 2003. During this same time period, enrollment in church-related private schools remained stable at 8 percent and enrollment in non church-related private schools increased from 1.6 to 2.4 percent. This report also presents data on parental perceptions of public school choice availability and associations between the public and private school types children were enrolled in and parental satisfaction with and involvement in the schools. About one-half of all students have parents who reported that public school choice was available in their community, with one-quarter of students attending assigned public schools having parents who considered enrolling them in a school other than the one they were currently attending, while 17 percent of all students and 27 percent of Black students attended a school other than their parent’s first-choice school. Generally, there were no parental involvement differences detected between students enrolled in assigned and chosen public schools. Parents of students in private schools reported more direct involvement in their children’s schools than parents of students enrolled in other types of schools."

Immigration

Eight for 2008: Education Ideas for the Next President
Date CapturedTuesday April 17, 2007 06:51 PM
Education Sector is offering the following eight education ideas for the 2008 presidential campaign -- Unlock the Pre-K Door , Offer Teachers a New Deal , Create a National Corps of 'SuperPrincipals', Open New Schools in Low-Income Neighborhoods, Launch Learning into the 21st Century, Reward Hard-Working Immigrant Students, Give Students a Roadmap to Good Colleges, Help Students Help Others.
No Child Left Behind Act: Education Assistance Could Help States Better Measure Progress of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedFriday March 23, 2007 01:44 PM
GAO-07-646T, March 23, 2007. The GAO report recommended that Education (1) support research on accommodations, (2) identify and provide technical support states need to ensure the validity of academic assessments, (3) publish additional guidance on requirements for assessing English language proficiency, and (4) explore ways to provide additional flexibility for measuring annual progress for these students. Education generally agreed with our recommendations and has taken a number of steps to address them.
Latinos Online: Hispanics with lower levels of education and English proficiency remain largely disconnected from the internet
Date CapturedThursday March 15, 2007 06:28 PM
By Susannah Fox, Pew Internet & American Life Project and Gretchen Livingston, Pew Hispanic Center find, "Differences in levels of education and English proficiency explain much of the difference in internet usage between Hispanics and non-Hispanics. Internet use is uniformly low for whites (32%), Hispanics (31%), and African Americans (25%) who have not completed high school. However, 41% of Latino adults have not finished high school, compared with about one in ten non-Hispanic whites and one in five African Americans. The same pattern is evident at the other end of the spectrum of educational attainment. College-educated adults all have equally high levels (about 90%) of internet use regardless of race or ethnicity, yet the college educated make up a smaller share of the Latino population when compared with non-Hispanics. Language is also a powerful factor, as internet use is much higher among Latinos who speak and read English fluently than among those who have limited English abilities or who only speak Spanish. Language is not an issue in the white and black populations as the shares of adults with limited English abilities is quite small. A statistical analysis of the survey results shows education and language are each highly significant factors when other differences in group characteristics are taken into account. When the different levels of language or education are controlled statistically, Hispanics and non-Hispanics show similar levels of internet use."
The Mexican American Struggle for Equal Educational Opportunity in Mendez v. Westminster: Helping to Pave the Way for Brown v. Board of Education
Date CapturedWednesday March 07, 2007 11:46 AM
RICHARD R. VALENCIA, professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the College of Education of the University of Texas at Austin writes, "Few people in the United States are aware of the central role that Mexican Americans have played in some of the most important legal struggles regarding school desegregation. The most significant such case is Mendez v. Westminster (1946), a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of more than 5,000 Mexican American students in Orange County, California. The Mendez case became the first successful constitutional challenge to segregation. In fact, in Mendez the U.S. District Court judge ruled that the Mexican American students' rights were being violated under the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The decision was affirmed by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Although the Mendez case was never appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, a number of legal scholars at that time hailed it as a case that could have accomplished what Brown eventually did eight years later: a reversal of the High Court's 1896 ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, which had sanctioned legal segregation for nearly 60 years." Teachers College Record Volume 107 Number 3, 2005, p. 389-423 http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11792, Date Accessed: 3/7/2007 11:44:54 AM
Public Education: Meeting the Needs of Students With Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedWednesday July 26, 2006 07:47 PM
This GAO report finds, "No clear consensus exists on the length of time children with limited English proficiency need to become proficient in English. Several factors make it difficult to generalize about how much time is needed." GAO-01-226 February 23, 2001.
Pre-K and Latinos: The Foundation of America's Future
Date CapturedMonday July 10, 2006 08:15 PM
Eugene E. Garcia, Ph.D., Arizona State University, College of Education, Tempe, AZ; Danielle M. Gonzales, M.Ed., Pre-K Now Washington, DC, July 2006. Providing Hispanics with much greater access to high-quality pre-k is critical to helping states meet the standards and mandates of NCLB. To maximize the benefits of increased Latino participation in pre-k, programs should be structured to build upon the existing strengths within Latino communities, including strong family bonds, a high value on educational achievement, and widespread support for public education and social systems.
Denver Public Schools: Resegregation, Latino Style
Date CapturedWednesday June 14, 2006 07:50 AM
By Chungmei Lee, The Civil Rights Project. This paper, the first of two reports, focuses on the dynamics of segregation, demographic changes, and implications for graduation rates in the Denver Public Schools. The relationship of the dramatic demographic changes to segregation trends is examined by measuring the average exposure of students to all racial groups, as well as to each other and the concentration of students in racially isolated schools during the five years preceding the 1995 Keyes decision and in the eight subsequent years following.
Diversity Spreads Out: Metropolitan Shifts in Hispanic, Asian, and Black Populations Since 2000
Date CapturedMonday March 27, 2006 12:33 PM
by William H. Frey, March 2006. Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program. Analysis of Census Bureau population estimates detailing the distribution of racial and ethnic groups within and across U.S. metropolitan areas since Census 2000 reveals that: Hispanic and Asian populations are spreading out from their traditional metropolitan centers, while the shift of blacks toward the South is accelerating. The Los Angeles and New York metropolitan areas contained 23 percent of the nation's Hispanic population in 2004, down from 30 percent in 1990. Of the nation's 361 metropolitan areas, 111 registered declines in white population from 2000 to 2004, with the largest absolute losses occurring in New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.
Immigrants at Mid-Decade: A Snapshot of America's Foreign-Born Population in 2005
Date CapturedMonday December 12, 2005 02:02 PM
By Steven A. Camarota, December 2005. Center for Immigration Studies. Thirty-one percent of adult immigrants have not completed high school, three-and-a-half times the rate for natives.

Information Management

The Records Manager
Date CapturedTuesday July 31, 2007 12:58 PM
The Records Manager, vol. 1 no. 3, Summer 2007. The Records Manager is the new newsletter of the SAA Records Management Roundtable.
School districts advised to protect computer data
Date CapturedSunday April 22, 2007 09:43 AM
Times Herald-Record reports, "Threats to computer data pose a major challenge to school district financial controls, according to a top state official."
Data Proposals Threaten Education and Civil Rights Accountability
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 08:14 AM
The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University concludes, "Data tracing trends over time is, of course, a central requirement of the No Child Left Behind Act, essential for judging compliance with various civil rights court orders, and required by the special education law. In some states, the change will make it appear that individual racial groups suddenly are performing substantially better or worse on some achievement tests even when nothing has changed about actual test results. One must not confuse the increases and losses in proficiency levels with actual achievement. In fact, policymakers would do well to be wary that the proposed guidelines do not result in unfair and arbitrary sanctions on schools and districts since the changes do not reflect actual improvements or losses in achievement levels."Lee, C. and Orfield, G. (2006). Data Proposals Threaten Education and Civil Rights Accountability. Cambridge, MA: The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University.
Implementing Graduation Counts: State Progress to Date
Date CapturedSunday August 13, 2006 09:52 PM
NGA Issue Brief written by Bridget Curran, Education Division, National Governors Association. (08/07/2006). "In 2005 governors of all 50 states signed the Graduation Counts Compact and made an unprecedented commitment to a common method for calculating each state's high school graduation rate. In addition to agreeing to a common formula for calculating the graduation rate, the governors committed to leading efforts to improve state data collection, reporting, and analysis; reporting additional indicators of outcomes for students; and reporting annually on their progress toward improved high school graduation, completion, and dropout data."
Forum Guide to Elementary/Secondary Virtual Education
Date CapturedThursday June 29, 2006 10:59 AM
This NCES guide provides recommendations for collecting accurate, comparable, and useful data about virtual education in an elementary/secondary education setting.

Information Policy

E P I C A l e r t -- Volume 14.16 -- August 10, 2007
Date CapturedMonday August 13, 2007 09:53 AM
Table of Contents: [1] Congress Enacts Sweeping Changes to Federal Wiretap Laws [2] New Law Strengthens Privacy Oversight [3] Canadian Group Urges Investigation of Google-DoubleClick Merger [4] Homeland Security Revamps Traveler Profiling Programs [5] Senate Passes Leahy-Cornyn Open Government Bill [6] News in Brief [7] EPIC Bookstore: "Complete Guide to Security and Privacy Metrics" [8] Upcoming Conferences and Events
Search Privacy Practices
Date CapturedSunday August 12, 2007 08:09 AM
Center for Democracy and Technology--a D.C.-based think tank--released a report (pdf) on the privacy policies of major search engines. Report includes recommendations including, "No amount of self-regulation in the search privacy space can replace the need for a comprehensive federal privacy law to protect consumers from bad actors. With consumers sharing more data than ever before online, the time has come to harmonize our nation’s privacy laws into a simple, flexible framework."
US Department of Education -- Office of Inspector General (OIG) Perspective on the Unsafe School Choice Option
Date CapturedFriday August 10, 2007 08:14 AM
We suggest that the Department and Congress, in considering legislative changes, require states to ensure that their USCO policies meet the following basic requirements: 1) All violent incidents, according to state code, are factored into the PDS determination, without the use of disciplinary action qualifiers; 2) Benchmarks for determining PDS are set at reasonable levels that are supported by objective and reliable data; and 3) PDS are identified based upon the most current year of data. These suggestions are intended to affect immediate improvement of the USCO in its current state. However, based on our audit work and further research, there is an apparent reluctance to fully comply with the USCO provision. Therefore, we are also offering our perspective on more in-depth changes to the provision that should help USCO to be better received by the education community, and therefore, encourage more willing compliance. The lack of incentive to comply with USCO will need to be addressed and resolved in order for the provision to realize its full potential as a tool for improving the level of safety in our nation’s schools.
Guidelines for Working with Law Enforcement Agencies
Date CapturedWednesday August 08, 2007 12:15 PM
By Michael Corn. EQ -- Volume 30 Number 3 2007. Checklist: * Create a policy to address the handling of all legal documents. * Form a team consisting of the security officer, legal counsel, and campus police. * Put campus legal counsel on your telephone speed-dial. * Meet with provost and/or chancellor to discuss law enforcement requests and investigations. * Review and document the salient features of your environment, including your institutional policies on data release and retention. * Understand your obligations with regard to confidentiality. * Discuss with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation whom you wish to inform of the investigation and why. * Work with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation to review what they are looking for and what will not be useful to them. * Develop internal procedures that control the materials and information of legally restricted information. Buy a safe for storing legal materials. * Work with law enforcement agents to better understand your environment and narrow the scope of information requests.
Understanding Denial-of-Service Attacks
Date CapturedThursday August 02, 2007 12:26 PM
Cyber Security Tip ST04-015 -- In a denial-of-service (DoS) attack, an attacker attempts to prevent legitimate users from accessing information or services. By targeting your computer and its network connection, or the computers and network of the sites you are trying to use, an attacker may be able to prevent you from accessing email, web sites, online accounts (banking, etc.), or other services that rely on the affected computer.
The Records Manager
Date CapturedTuesday July 31, 2007 12:58 PM
The Records Manager, vol. 1 no. 3, Summer 2007. The Records Manager is the new newsletter of the SAA Records Management Roundtable.
Forum Curriculum for Improving Education Data: A Resource for Local Education
Date CapturedThursday July 12, 2007 07:00 PM
This curriculum supports efforts to improve the quality of education data by serving as training materials for K-12 school and district staff. It provides lesson plans, instructional handouts, and related resources, and presents concepts necessary to help schools develop a culture for improving data quality. National Forum on Education Statistics (2007). Forum Curriculum for Improving Education Data: A Resource for Local Education Agencies (NFES 2007-808). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Teens, Privacy and Online Social Networks: How teens manage their online identities and personal information in the age of MySpace
Date CapturedWednesday June 27, 2007 08:26 PM
Pew Internet Study by Amanda Lenhart and Mary Madden, "While many teens post their first name and photos on their profiles, they rarely post information on public profiles they believe would help strangers actually locate them such as their full name, home phone number or cell phone number. At the same time, nearly two-thirds of teens with profiles (63%) believe that a motivated person could eventually identify them from the information they publicly provide on their profiles. A new report, based on a survey and a series of focus groups conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project examine how teens, particularly those with profiles online, make decisions about disclosing or shielding personal information. Some 55% of online teens have profiles and most of them restrict access to their profile in some way. Of those with profiles, 66% say their profile is not visible to all internet users. Of those whose profile can be accessed by anyone online, nearly half (46%) say they give at least some false information. Teens post fake information to protect themselves and also to be playful or silly."
Cyberbullying and Online Teens
Date CapturedWednesday June 27, 2007 08:21 PM
Pew Internet Study --by Amanda Lenhart . "About one third (32%) of all teenagers who use the internet say they have been targets of a range of annoying and potentially menacing online activities – such as receiving threatening messages; having their private emails or text messages forwarded without consent; having an embarrassing picture posted without permission; or having rumors about them spread online."
COMMENTS OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
Date CapturedWednesday June 20, 2007 10:05 AM
Before the Federal Communications Commission Washington, DC 20554 -- In the Matter of: Broadband Industry Practices -- "The American Library Association supports minimalist net neutrality legislation and regulation that preserves the competitive online markets for content and services. Bandwidth and access should be offered on equal terms to all willing to pay. Otherwise, broadband providers will be free to leverage their quasimonopolies into lucrative but market-distorting agreements. The vitality of voices on the Internet is critical to the intellectual freedom that libraries around the world are trying to protect and promote. Laws that preserve net neutrality are the best way to preserve a vibrant diversity of viewpoints into the foreseeable future."
Privacy Policy Guidance Memorandum 2007-02
Date CapturedThursday June 14, 2007 07:07 PM
Regarding Use of Social Security Numbers at the Department of Homeland Security, June 4, 2007.
Most School Districts Have Developed Emergency Management Plans, but Would Benefit from Additional Federal Guidance
Date CapturedThursday June 14, 2007 02:07 PM
GAO Report: While most school districts have procedures in their plans for staff roles and responsibilities, for example, school districts have not widely employed such procedures as, academic instruction via local radio or television, for continuing student education in the event of an extended school closure, such as might occur during a pandemic. Likewise, while many districts have procedures for special needs students, GAO found during site visits that some of these procedures may not fully ensure the safety of these students in an emergency. Finally, while most school districts practice their emergency management plans annually within the school community, GAO estimates that over one-quarter of school districts have never trained with any first responders and over two-thirds of school districts do not regularly train with community partners on how to implement their school district emergency management plans. Many school districts experience challenges in planning for emergencies, and some school districts face difficulties in communicating and coordinating with first responders and parents, but most do not have such challenges with students. Based on GAO’s survey of school districts, in many school districts officials struggle to balance priorities related to educating students and other administrative responsibilities with activities for emergency management and consider a lack of equipment, training for staff, and personnel with expertise in the area of emergency planning as challenges. In an estimated 39 percent of school districts with emergency management plans, officials experienced a lack of partnerships, limited time or funding to plan, or lack of interoperability between equipment used by school districts and first responders.
Report to the President on Issues Raised by the Virginia Tech Tragedy
Date CapturedWednesday June 13, 2007 08:11 PM
Key Findings -- *Critical Information Sharing Faces Substantial Obstacles: Education officials, healthcare providers, law enforcement personnel, and others are not fully informed about when they can share critical information on persons who are likely to be a danger to self or others, and the resulting confusion may chill legitimate information sharing. *Accurate and Complete Information on Individuals Prohibited from Possessing Firearms is Essential to Keep Guns Out of the Wrong Hands: State laws and practices do not uniformly ensure that information on persons restricted from possessing firearms is appropriately captured and available to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). *Improved Awareness and Communication are Key to Prevention: It is important that parents, students, and teachers learn to recognize warning signs and encourage those who need help to seek it, so that people receive the care they need and our communities are safe. *It is Critical to Get People with Mental Illness the Services They Need: Meeting the challenge of adequate and appropriate community integration of people with mental illness requires effective coordination of community service providers who are sensitive to the interests of safety, privacy, and provision of care. *Where We Know What to Do, We Have to be Better at Doing It: For the many states and communities that have already adopted programs, including emergency preparedness and violence prevention plans, to address school and community violence, the challenge is fully implementing these programs through practice and effective communication.
2007 Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) Breach Report
Date CapturedTuesday June 12, 2007 08:58 AM
View breaches of records at education institutions in 2007.
Protecting Children In The Internet Age
Date CapturedMonday June 11, 2007 01:50 PM
New York State Senate Task Force On Critical Choices
School districts advised to protect computer data
Date CapturedSunday April 22, 2007 09:43 AM
Times Herald-Record reports, "Threats to computer data pose a major challenge to school district financial controls, according to a top state official."
Latinos Online: Hispanics with lower levels of education and English proficiency remain largely disconnected from the internet
Date CapturedThursday March 15, 2007 06:28 PM
By Susannah Fox, Pew Internet & American Life Project and Gretchen Livingston, Pew Hispanic Center find, "Differences in levels of education and English proficiency explain much of the difference in internet usage between Hispanics and non-Hispanics. Internet use is uniformly low for whites (32%), Hispanics (31%), and African Americans (25%) who have not completed high school. However, 41% of Latino adults have not finished high school, compared with about one in ten non-Hispanic whites and one in five African Americans. The same pattern is evident at the other end of the spectrum of educational attainment. College-educated adults all have equally high levels (about 90%) of internet use regardless of race or ethnicity, yet the college educated make up a smaller share of the Latino population when compared with non-Hispanics. Language is also a powerful factor, as internet use is much higher among Latinos who speak and read English fluently than among those who have limited English abilities or who only speak Spanish. Language is not an issue in the white and black populations as the shares of adults with limited English abilities is quite small. A statistical analysis of the survey results shows education and language are each highly significant factors when other differences in group characteristics are taken into account. When the different levels of language or education are controlled statistically, Hispanics and non-Hispanics show similar levels of internet use."
School safety: ICSD security upgrades necessary
Date CapturedTuesday December 05, 2006 07:49 AM
Ithaca Journal opines, "The ICSD Board of Education is currently weighing whether to invest $500,000 in a new security system that incorporates a key card access system and cameras. The money would come in the bond referendum the BOE is deciding to bring before voters early next year. It is still too early to tell whether each component on the district's wish list is worth the money needed to pay for a new security system. But the events of Nov. 13 should give everyone in the district something to think about when deciding what should and should not be approved. Perhaps our old system of locking doors just isn't working."
Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2005
Date CapturedThursday November 30, 2006 08:55 AM
"This [NCES] report presents 11 years of data from 1994 to 2005 (no survey was conducted in 2004) on Internet access in U.S. public schools by school characteristics. It provides trend analysis on the percent of public schools and instructional rooms with Internet access and on the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access. The report contains data on the types of Internet connections, technologies and procedures used to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet, and the availability of hand-held and laptop computers to students and teachers. It also provides information on teacher professional development on how to integrate the use of the Internet into the curriculum, and the use of the Internet to provide opportunities and information for teaching and learning." Wells, J., and Lewis, L. (2006). Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994–2005 (NCES 2007-020). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
For $150, Third-World Laptop Stirs a Big Debate
Date CapturedThursday November 30, 2006 07:15 AM
NY Times reports, ""Five countries — Argentina, Brazil, Libya, Nigeria and Thailand — have made tentative commitments to put the computers into the hands of millions of students, with production in Taiwan expected to begin by mid-2007. "
So Many Schools, So Few Options:How Mayor Bloomberg’s Small High School Reforms Deny Full Access to English Language Learners
Date CapturedWednesday November 29, 2006 07:08 AM
Key findings: ELLs Are Not Given Full and Equitable Access to All Small High Schools, Parents of ELLs and Students Reported Barriers in the High School Admissions and Enrollment Process, The Small School Policy for ELLs Appears to be Forcing ELLs to Remain in Large High Schools that Do Not Have Services to Meet Their Needs , Small Schools are Not Being Created in Queens, in which the Largest Number of ELLs Reside. A joint report by: The New York Immigration Coalition & Advocates for Children of New York In collaboration with: Chhaya Community Development Corporation Chinese Progressive Association Chinese-American Planning Council Council of Peoples Organization Haitian Americans United for Progress Make the Road by Walking Metropolitan Russian American Parents Association November 2006.
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner, New York State Education Department
Date CapturedFriday November 10, 2006 08:08 AM
ELA and Mathematics Results on the New York State Testing and Accountability Reporting Tool (nySTART): Beginning November 14, authorized users in schools and districts will be able to access parent reports for the grades 3-8 State assessments in mathematics using nySTART. Beginning November 13, files containing the mathematics parent reports will be distributed to Regional Information Centers and the Big 5 school districts. If your district has contracted with a Regional Information Center or BOCES to print the reports, please contact them for information about the printing and distribution schedule. Information about interpreting student scores, particularly the standard performance indices, is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/nystart/2006/InterpretingStudentScores_files/frame.htm. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Accountability Verification: On November 14, school districts and charter schools will have access to two sets of reports allowing them to verify student data that will be used to determine each district’s and school’s accountability status at the elementary and middle levels for the 2006-07 school year. Each school superintendent, school principal, and staff member with account administrator privileges can access these reports through nySTART, using their personal UserIDs and passwords. The deadline for submitting data changes to your district’s Regional Information Center or Level 1 Repository operator is November 20. More information about the verification process is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/nystart/. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Essential Elements Schools to Watch: New York State is one of 14 states that has joined Schools to Watch, a national recognition program developed by the National Forum to Accelerate Middle Grades Reform. In New York, seven schools were selected for the 2006 group of Schools to Watch by distinguishing themselves in academic excellence, developmental responsiveness, social equity and organization and structure. A list of the schools is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/mle/news/schools2watch.htm. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Reminder of Annual AHERA Notifications to Employees and Parents: The federal Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires all schools to provide public notification regarding inspections and other activities related to asbestos. Schools must also make its asbestos management plan available for public inspection. For more information, go to http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/facplan/AHERA/aheranotifyreminder.htm. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- VESID Update: National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS) and National Instructional Materials Access Center (NIMAC): Guidance regarding NIMAS and NIMAC, as required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, is now available at http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/persprep/nimas.htm. NIMAC is designed to streamline access to instructional materials that meet the NIMAS standard for students who are blind or have other print disabilities. Please review and share as appropriate; a response is needed no later than November 30, 2006. Provision of Special Education Services to Parentally Placed Nonpublic Elementary and Secondary School Students with Disabilities: This memorandum, available at http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/ nonpublic.htm, informs school districts of their responsibilities to provide special education services to parentally placed nonpublic school students with disabilities for the 2006-07 school year. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Previous News and Notes: 10/27/06 10/20/06 10/6/06 11/09/2006
Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006
Date CapturedThursday November 09, 2006 08:46 AM
Study concludes: "Problem areas identified in previous years are still seen as areas of concern among academic leaders. • Only 4.6 percent of Chief Academic Officers agreed that there are no significant barriers to widespread adoption of online learning. • Nearly two-thirds of the academic leaders cite the need for more discipline on the part of online students as a critical barrier. • Faculty issues, both acceptance of online and the need for greater time and effort to teach online, are also important barriers. • Neither a perceived lack of demand on the part of potential students nor the acceptance of an online degree by potential employers was seen as a critical barrier." I. Elaine Allen, Ph.D., and Jeff Seaman, Ph.D., November 2006
New York City Considers Plan to Let Outsiders Run Schools
Date CapturedThursday October 05, 2006 03:19 AM
NY Times reports, "Randi Weingarten, the teachers’ union president, urged the administration to make its discussions more public. 'I have been concerned about the sub rosa debate on whether to privatize the management of the school system for quite a while,' she said. 'On an issue that is this transcendent there has to be a real public debate.'”
It Takes a Parent: Transforming Education in the Wake of the No Child Left Behind Act
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 01:07 AM
"With the goal of demonstrating the importance of parental involvement as a key strategy for improving student success, this report provides recommendations for education leaders and policymakers. It focuses on three major strands that are crucial to effective parental involvement: 1. Information: The opportunities and challenges of parental awareness about student and school performance; 2. Engagement: The importance of meaningful parental engagement with school officials and teachers; and 3. Advocacy: The critical role that effective parent advocacy, based on good information and informed engagement, plays in student and school performance." The report was produced by Appleseed, in coordination with several other key law firms and groups. Law firm, Holland & Knight, coordinated and carried out much of the research and drafted the final report, with assistance in two states from volunteers from DLA Piper. The National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Columbia University and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP played key roles in gathering and assessing information.
School and Parent Interaction by Household Language and Poverty Status: 2002-03
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 03:35 PM
NCES: Language minority parents may face a number of challenges when trying to communicate or become involved with their child’s school. This Issue Brief describes school-to-home communication practices and opportunities for parent involvement at school as reported by parents of U.S. school-age students from primarily English- and primarily Spanish-speaking households during the 2002–03 school year. Among the findings: A greater percentage of students in English-speaking households than in Spanish-speaking households had parents who reported receiving personal notes or e-mails about the student; receiving newsletters, memos, or notices addressed to all parents; opportunities to attend general meetings; opportunities to attend school events; and chances to volunteer. Differences were still apparent after taking poverty status into account. This Issue Brief was prepared by Christine Enyeart, Juliet Diehl, Gillian Hampden-Thompson, and Marion Scotchmer of the American Institutes for Research.
Data Proposals Threaten Education and Civil Rights Accountability
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 08:14 AM
The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University concludes, "Data tracing trends over time is, of course, a central requirement of the No Child Left Behind Act, essential for judging compliance with various civil rights court orders, and required by the special education law. In some states, the change will make it appear that individual racial groups suddenly are performing substantially better or worse on some achievement tests even when nothing has changed about actual test results. One must not confuse the increases and losses in proficiency levels with actual achievement. In fact, policymakers would do well to be wary that the proposed guidelines do not result in unfair and arbitrary sanctions on schools and districts since the changes do not reflect actual improvements or losses in achievement levels."Lee, C. and Orfield, G. (2006). Data Proposals Threaten Education and Civil Rights Accountability. Cambridge, MA: The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University.
Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003
Date CapturedTuesday September 05, 2006 11:00 AM
This report examines the use of computers and the Internet by American children enrolled in nursery school and students in kindergarten through grade 12. One of the more important findings presented in the report is that schools appear to help narrow the disparities between different types of students in terms of computer use. Differences in the rates of computer use are smaller at school than they are at home when considering such characteristics as race/ethnicity, family income, and parental education. DeBell, M., and Chapman, C. (2006). Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003 (NCES 2006– 065). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Implementing Graduation Counts: State Progress to Date
Date CapturedSunday August 13, 2006 09:52 PM
NGA Issue Brief written by Bridget Curran, Education Division, National Governors Association. (08/07/2006). "In 2005 governors of all 50 states signed the Graduation Counts Compact and made an unprecedented commitment to a common method for calculating each state's high school graduation rate. In addition to agreeing to a common formula for calculating the graduation rate, the governors committed to leading efforts to improve state data collection, reporting, and analysis; reporting additional indicators of outcomes for students; and reporting annually on their progress toward improved high school graduation, completion, and dropout data."
The Importance of Policies in E-Learning Instruction
Date CapturedSaturday July 29, 2006 10:11 PM
By Shirley Waterhouse and Rodney O. Rogers. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, Volume 27 Number 3 2004. Authors discuss E-learning policies inlcuding policies in the syllabus, student privacy, e-mail policies, software standards policies, assignment policies, technical help policies, student code of conduct and intellectual property rights policies. Adapted from a chapter in The Power of Elearning: The Essential Guide to Teaching in the Digital Age by Shirley Waterhouse Boston, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon, October 2004.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
Date CapturedThursday July 27, 2006 09:36 PM
"The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are 'eligible students.'" parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31): School officials with legitimate educational interest; Other schools to which a student is transferring; Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school; Accrediting organizations; To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law. Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school.
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) and Libraries
Date CapturedThursday July 20, 2006 08:56 PM
American Library Association -- Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) policy brief explains, " the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act or “CALEA” and how it relates to our Nation’s libraries. This is an important issue because it may impact library budgets in the very near future, require certain technology expenditures and impose administrative burdens on library personnel to administer certain security requirements under the law."
Forum Guide to the Privacy of Student Information: A Resource for Schools
Date CapturedThursday June 29, 2006 10:50 AM
This NCES guide was written to help school and local education agency staff to better understand and apply FERPA, a federal law that protects privacy interests of parents and students in student education records.

International Competition

Problem Solving in the PISA and TIMSS 2003 Assessments
Date CapturedTuesday December 26, 2006 01:38 PM
NCES: When examining the outcomes of education at local, state, national, or international levels, one of the major concerns of educators is whether students are able to employ the knowledge and skills they have acquired in formal schooling and through daily living experiences to solve problems. Students’ capabilities to solve problems are necessary not only for the demands of everyday life—personal, social, and public decisionmaking—but also for their future careers and their ability to continue learning in formal education settings. The purpose of this report is to compare and contrast features of the problem-solving tasks found in the 2003 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the 2003 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)." Dossey, J.A., McCrone, S.A., and O’Sullivan, C. (2006). Problem Solving in the PISA and TIMSS 2003 Assessments (NCES 2007-049). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved December 26, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
A TEST OF LEADERSHIP: Charting the Future of U.S. Higher Education, A Report of the Commission Appointed by Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings
Date CapturedSunday November 12, 2006 07:52 AM
Pre-Publication Copy September 2006. CONCLUSION: In short, the commission believes it  is imperative that the nation give urgent attention to improving its system of higher education.   The  future of  our country’s colleges and universities is threatened by global competitive pressures, powerful technological developments, restraints  on public finance and serious structural limitations that cry out for reform. Thid report has recommended strategic actions designed to  make higher education more accessible, more affordable, and more accountable, while maintaining world-class quality. Our colleges and universities must become more transparent, faster to respond to rapidly  changing circumstances and increasingly productive in order to deal effectively  with  the powerful forces of change they now face. But reaching these goals will also require difficult decisions and major changes from many others beyond the higher education community. The commission calls on policymakers to address the needs of higher education in order to maintain social mobility and a high standard of living. We call on the business community  to become directly and fully engaged with government and higher education leaders in developing innovative structures for delivering 21st-century  educational services—and in  providing  the necessary financial and human resources for that purpose. Finally, we call on the American public to join in our commitment to improving the postsecondary institutions on which so much of our future—as individuals and as a nation—relies.Working together, we can build on the past successes of U.S. higher education to create an improved and revitalized postsecondary system that is better tailored to the demands, as well as the opportunities, of a new century. U.S. Department of Education, A Test of Leadership: Charting the Future of U.S. Higher Education. Washington, D.C., 2006.
Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 Nonresponse Bias Analysis
Date CapturedWednesday November 01, 2006 11:47 AM
This NCES technical report explores the extent of potential bias introduced into the U.S. TIMSS study through nonresponse on the part of schools. Data from the third cycle of TIMSS, conducted in April-June, 2003, are the basis for the analyses.The investigation into nonresponse bias at the school level for U.S. TIMSS 2003 samples for grades 4 and 8 shows that there was no statistically significant relationship detected between participation status and the majority of school characteristics that are available for analysis. Ferraro, D., and Van de Kerckhove, W. (2006). Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 Nonresponse Bias Analysis (NCES 2007-044). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved November 1, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
President Bush calls for more spending on science
Date CapturedSaturday July 08, 2006 04:49 PM
USA Today reports AP story, "He also wants to train thousand of new science and math teachers and extend a popular tax credit businesses can receive for investing in research and development. The total price tag over 10 years would be $136 billion."
"Restoring U.S. Competitiveness for International Students and Scholars"
Date CapturedMonday June 19, 2006 09:46 AM
"Restoring U.S. Competitiveness for International Students and Scholars" argues that the absence of a national strategy to attract international students and scholars is starting to show its effects, and urges a renewed commitment by the United States to this important asset.
Math and Science Education in a Global Age: What the U.S. Can Learn from China
Date CapturedThursday June 08, 2006 07:06 PM
This paper outlines key ways in which China, and East Asia more broadly, have been successful in producing higher student achievement in math and science.

Legislation

California AB.143
Date CapturedSaturday September 03, 2011 02:40 PM
INTRODUCED BY Assembly Member Fuentes; This bill would redefine directory information to no longer include a pupil's place of birth and to also include a pupil's e-mail address.
New York Senate; S.2357-B
Date CapturedTuesday June 07, 2011 12:07 PM
This bill, sponsored by Sen. Oppenheimer, restricts the sale of student PII and requires affirmative consent for the release of sensitive information.
OHIO 3319.321 Confidentiality
Date CapturedThursday March 10, 2011 02:40 PM
Ohio Revised Code » Title [33] XXXIII EDUCATION (A) No person shall release, or permit access to, the directory information concerning any students attending a public school to any person or group for use in a profit-making plan or activity. Notwithstanding division (B)(4) of section 149.43 of the Revised Code, a person may require disclosure of the requestor’s identity or the intended use of the directory information concerning any students attending a public school to ascertain whether the directory information is for use in a profit-making plan or activity.
New York State Assembly School Funding Bill Summary - A08590
Date CapturedSunday July 30, 2006 10:27 AM
Establishes the school property tax elimination act; provides a method whereby school districts may opt into an alternative method of school financing as provided in the article whereby funds are raised through a school income tax in addition to a property tax on "non-primary residence" property.
U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee approves Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies spending bill for fiscal year 2007.
Date CapturedThursday July 20, 2006 11:31 PM
U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee July 20, 2006 press release.

Libraries

COMMENTS OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
Date CapturedWednesday June 20, 2007 10:05 AM
Before the Federal Communications Commission Washington, DC 20554 -- In the Matter of: Broadband Industry Practices -- "The American Library Association supports minimalist net neutrality legislation and regulation that preserves the competitive online markets for content and services. Bandwidth and access should be offered on equal terms to all willing to pay. Otherwise, broadband providers will be free to leverage their quasimonopolies into lucrative but market-distorting agreements. The vitality of voices on the Internet is critical to the intellectual freedom that libraries around the world are trying to protect and promote. Laws that preserve net neutrality are the best way to preserve a vibrant diversity of viewpoints into the foreseeable future."
Households' Use of Public and Other Types of Libraries: 2002
Date CapturedTuesday January 16, 2007 10:35 AM
This ED TAB presents a series of tabulations that highlight households’ use of public libraries. Patterns of library use by household demographic, social, economic, and geographic characteristics are presented. Glander, M., and Dam, T. (2006). Households’ Use of Public and Other Types of Libraries: 2002 (NCES 2007- 327). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved January 16, 2007 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
State Library Agencies: Fiscal Year 2005
Date CapturedWednesday December 06, 2006 05:33 PM
This report provides a statistical profile of state library agencies in the 50 states and the District of Columbia for fiscal year 2005. The report includes information on governance, collections and services, service outlets and staff, revenue, and expenditures. The data were collected through the State Library Agencies Survey conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Holton, B., Kroe, E., O’Shea, P., Sheckells, C., Dorinski, S., and Freeman, M. (2006). State Library Agencies: Fiscal Year 2005 (NCES 2007-300). U.S. Department of Education, NCES. Retrieved December 6, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Academic Libraries: 2004
Date CapturedTuesday November 14, 2006 05:53 PM
The selected findings and tables in this NCES report, based on the 2004 Academic Libraries Survey, summarize services, staff, collections, and expenditures of academic libraries in degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The report includes a number of key findings: During fiscal year (FY) 2004, there were 155.1 million circulation transactions from academic libraries’ general collection. During a typical week in the fall of 2004, 1.4 million academic library reference transactions were conducted, including computer searches. The nation’s 3,700 academic libraries held 982.6 million books; serial backfiles; and other paper materials, including government documents at the end of FY 2004. Academic libraries spent $2.2 billion on information resources during FY 2004. Holton, B., Vaden, K., and O’Shea P. (2006). Academic Libraries: 2004. (NCES 2007-301). U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved November 14, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) and Libraries
Date CapturedThursday July 20, 2006 08:56 PM
American Library Association -- Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) policy brief explains, " the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act or “CALEA” and how it relates to our Nation’s libraries. This is an important issue because it may impact library budgets in the very near future, require certain technology expenditures and impose administrative burdens on library personnel to administer certain security requirements under the law."

Literacy

Federal Support for Adolescent Literacy: A Solid Investment
Date CapturedFriday July 13, 2007 09:34 AM
This Alliance for Excellent Education brief lays out a set of strategic policy recommendations that include: (1) Encourage schools, districts, and states to articulate clear, comprehensive, actionable plans for improving literacy instruction; (2) Invest in tools that help schools identify struggling readers and appropriately adjust instruction in grades 4-12; (3) Invest in ongoing professional development programs designed to help all middle and high school teachers provide effective reading and writing instruction in their subject area; (4) Support and invest in accountability systems that give teachers strong incentives to provide effective reading and writing instruction; and, (5) Invest in ongoing research on and evaluation of strategies to improve adolescent literacy.
Reading First: States Report Improvements in Reading Instruction, but Additional Procedures Would Clarify Education's Role in Ensuring Proper Implementation by States
Date CapturedFriday March 23, 2007 01:54 PM
GAO-07-161, February 28, 2007. GAO recommends that Education establish control procedures to guide departmental officials and contractors in their interactions with states, districts, and schools to ensure compliance with statutory provisions. GAO also recommends that Education establish and disseminate clear procedures governing its monitoring process. Education, in its response to a draft of this report, agreed with GAO’s recommendations.
The Effects of Theoretically Different Instruction and Student Characteristics on the Skills of Struggling Readers
Date CapturedMonday March 05, 2007 03:41 PM
"This study investigated the effectiveness of combining enhanced classroom instruction and intense supplemental intervention for struggling readers in first grade. Further, it compared two supplemental interventions derived from distinct theoretical orientations, examining them in terms of effects on academic outcomes and whether children's characteristics were differentially related to an instructional intervention." Mathes, P.G., Denton, C.A., Fletcher, J.M., Anthony, J.L., Francis, D.J., & Schatschneider, C. (2005, April/May/June). The Effects of Theoretically Different Instruction and Student Characteristics on the Skills of Struggling Readers. Reading Research Quarterly, 40(2), 148–182. doi: 10.1598/RRQ.40.2.2
Reinterpreting the Development of Reading Skills
Date CapturedMonday March 05, 2007 03:25 PM
"Theories about reading have neglected basic differences in the developmental trajectories of skills related to reading. This essay proposes that some reading skills, such as learning the letters of the alphabet, are constrained to small sets of knowledge that are mastered in relatively brief periods of development. In contrast, other skills, such as vocabulary, are unconstrained by the knowledge to be acquired or the duration of learning. The conceptual, developmental, and methodological constraints on different reading skills are described in this essay that identifies various types of constraints on reading constructs and measures. Examples of reading research and assessment are discussed to illustrate (a) how the constraints can help to explain transitory correlational patterns among reading data, (b) how proxy effects surrounding constrained skills influence interpretations of reading development, (c) how prescriptions to teach constrained skills are causal misinterpretations of longitudinal correlations, and (d) why interventions on constrained skills usually lead only to temporary gains on skills aligned with the constrained skill." Paris, S.G. (2005, April/May/June). Reinterpreting the Development of Reading Skills. Reading Research Quarterly, 40(2), 184–202. doi: 10.1598/RRQ.40.2.3
$101.6 Million in Early Reading First Grants Awarded to 25 States
Date CapturedFriday September 01, 2006 10:29 PM
U.S. Department of Education: Early Reading First programs focus on language, cognition and early reading so that young children enter kindergarten with the oral language, phonological awareness, print awareness and knowledge of the alphabet necessary to begin to learn how to read.
DOES WHOLE-SCHOOL REFORM BOOST STUDENT PERFORMANCE? THE CASE OF NEW YORK CITY
Date CapturedSaturday June 17, 2006 11:52 AM
Robert Bifulco, William Duncombe, John Yinger. Education Finance and Accountability Program (EFAP). Thousands of schools around the country have implemented whole-school reform programs to boost student performance. This paper uses quasi-experimental methods to estimate the impact of whole-school reform on students’ reading performance in New York City, where various reform programs were adopted in dozens of troubled elementary schools in the mid- 1990s. Two popular reform programs—the School Development Program and Success for All—do not significantly increase reading scores but might have if they had been fully implemented. The More Effective Schools program does boost reading scores, particularly for the poorest students, but only when program “trainers” remain in the school and the students are native English speakers.
Genetic and environmental influences on early literacy
Date CapturedThursday February 09, 2006 11:31 AM
Brian Byrne, Richard K. Olson, Stefan Samuelsson, Sally Wadsworth, Robin Corley, John C. DeFries and Erik Willcutt. Prereading and early reading skills analyses indicate a strong genetic influence on preschool phonological awareness, rapid naming and verbal memory. (note: for definitive version see Journal of Research in Reading, Volume 29 Page 33 - February 2006, doi:10.1111/j.1467-9817.2006.00291.x or www.blackwell-synergy.com)

Longitudinal Database

America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being
Date CapturedTuesday August 28, 2012 07:23 AM
The Forum fosters coordination and integration among 22 Federal agencies that produce or use statistical data on children and families, and seeks to improve Federal data on children and families.
Updated Guidance on the Collection and Reporting of Teacher and Course Data in the Student Information Repository System (SIRS)
Date CapturedWednesday February 29, 2012 09:19 AM
This memorandum provides important updates on the implementation of federal and State requirements for reporting professional staff and course data for students. This guidance directly addresses three issues: (1) Federal and State requirements for charter and other public schools, school districts, and BOCES to report additional student data, including course enrollment and the teachers/principals responsible for a student’s instruction; (2) The timeline for reporting new data elements; and (3) Implementation strategies for collecting and reporting these data.
New York Senate; S.2357-B
Date CapturedTuesday June 07, 2011 12:07 PM
This bill, sponsored by Sen. Oppenheimer, restricts the sale of student PII and requires affirmative consent for the release of sensitive information.
Education New York comments re Student Privacy submitted to FERPA NPRM - May 23, 2011
Date CapturedMonday May 23, 2011 09:22 PM
Document ID: ED-2011-OM-0002-0001: Family Educational Rights and Privacy. The proposed changes to FERPA do not adequately address the capacity of marketers and other commercial enterprises to capture, use, and re-sell student information. Even with privacy controls in place, it is also far too easy for individuals to get a hold of student information and use it for illegal purposes, including identity theft, child abduction in custody battles, and domestic violence. Few parents are aware, for example, that anyone can request -- and receive -- a student directory from a school. Data and information breaches occur every day in Pre-K-20 schools across the country, so that protecting student privacy has become a matter of plugging holes in a dyke rather than advancing a comprehensive policy that makes student privacy protection the priority.
United States House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor Hearing on “How Data Can be Used to Inform Educational Outcomes” April 14, 2010
Date CapturedMonday March 14, 2011 07:36 PM
1. States are warehousing sensitive information about identifiable children. 2. The Fordham CLIP study documents that privacy protections are lacking and rules need to be developed and implemented to assure that children’s educational records are adequately protected. 3. As part of basic privacy standards, strong data security is necessary to minimize the risks of data invasions, scandals and melt-downs from centralized databases of children’s personal information. Statement of Joel R. Reidenberg, Professor of Law and Founding Academic Director Center on Law and Information Policy, Fordham University School of Law New York, NY
PAUL GAMMILL v U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Date CapturedMonday March 14, 2011 12:44 PM
Whistleblower Retaliation lawsuit filed by Gammill against USED for retaliation of sharing an illegal attempt to circumvent FERPA. Case Number: 1:2011cv00409; Filed: February 18, 2011; Court: District Of Columbia District Court; Office: Washington, DC Office; County: 88888; Presiding Judge: John D. Bates
Data Quality Campaign Release of Data for Action 2010: DQC's State Analysis
Date CapturedMonday March 07, 2011 06:15 PM
On February 16, 2011 DQC discussed the results of its sixth annual state analysis Data for Action 2010, a powerful policymaking tool to drive education leaders to use data in decision making. Data for Action is a series of analyses on states’ ability to collect and use data to improve student success. It provides transparency about state progress and priority actions they need to take to collect and use longitudinal data to improve student success.
Basic Concepts and Definitions for Privacy and Confidentiality in Student Education Records
Date CapturedThursday March 03, 2011 01:21 PM
NCES 2011-601 This first brief discusses basic concepts and definitions that establish a common set of terms related to the protection of personally identifiable information, especially in education records.
Education and Workforce Data Connections: A Primer on States’ Status
Date CapturedWednesday April 14, 2010 06:16 PM
Data Quality Campaign - [States are currently working to connect education and workforce data, however, states are far from reaching the goal of having data systems that can link across the P-20/Workforce spectrum. To connect these education and workforce databases, states should engage a broad range of stakeholders to: 1. Prioritize, through broad-based stakeholder input, the critical policy questions to drive the development and use of longitudinal data systems. 2. Ensure data systems are interoperable within and across agencies and states by adopting or developing common data standards, definitions and language. 3. Protect personally identifiable information through governance policies and practices that promote the security of the information while allowing appropriate data access and sharing.]
Data Quality Campaign Quarterly Issue Meeting: Linking Data Across Agencies: States That Are Making It Work
Date CapturedMonday November 09, 2009 07:27 PM
The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) will host Linking Data Across Agencies: States That Are Making It Work on Thursday, November 12, 2009 from 2:30 to 4:30 P.M. (ET) in Washington, DC at the Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Room 233-235. This meeting will highlight leading states that are successfully linking data across systems and agencies to answer critical policy questions aimed at improving student achievement. A corresponding issue brief co-authored by the DQC and the Forum for Youth Investment will be released at the meeting that captures the current status of states’ ability to link data across agencies and provide several state case studies that capture promising strategies to sharing individual-level data across systems and agencies to improve student achievement. Registration to attend in person is required by Tuesday November 10, 2009 and strongly encouraged if participating in the interactive webcast. Seating is limited, so please sign up early! A video of this session and corresponding issue brief will be available at the campaign’s Web site after November 16, 2009.
CHILDREN’S EDUCATIONAL RECORDS AND PRIVACY -- A STUDY OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL STATE REPORTING SYSTEMS -- October 28, 2009
Date CapturedFriday October 30, 2009 09:44 AM
[The Study reports on the results of a survey of all fifty states and finds that state educational databases across the country ignore key privacy protections for the nation's K-12 children. The Study finds that large amounts of personally identifiable data and sensitive personal information about children are stored by the state departments of education in electronic warehouses or for the states by third party vendors. These data warehouses typically lack adequate privacy protections, such as clear access and use restrictions and data retention policies, are often not compliant with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, and leave K-12 children unprotected from data misuse, improper data release, and data breaches. The Study provides recommendations for best practices and legislative reform to address these privacy problems.] Joel R. Reidenberg, Professor of Law and Founding Academic Director of CLIP Jamela Debelak, Esq., Executive Director of CLIP

Migrant Education

Public Education: Meeting the Needs of Students With Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedWednesday July 26, 2006 07:47 PM
This GAO report finds, "No clear consensus exists on the length of time children with limited English proficiency need to become proficient in English. Several factors make it difficult to generalize about how much time is needed." GAO-01-226 February 23, 2001.

MOOC

What Campus Leaders Need to Know About MOOCs
Date CapturedFriday February 08, 2013 12:59 PM
What Campus Leaders Need to Know About MOOCs
Date CapturedFriday February 01, 2013 10:42 PM
An EDUCAUSE Executive Briefing on MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES (MOOCs)

NCLB

Education and Workforce Data Connections: A Primer on States’ Status
Date CapturedWednesday April 14, 2010 06:16 PM
Data Quality Campaign - [States are currently working to connect education and workforce data, however, states are far from reaching the goal of having data systems that can link across the P-20/Workforce spectrum. To connect these education and workforce databases, states should engage a broad range of stakeholders to: 1. Prioritize, through broad-based stakeholder input, the critical policy questions to drive the development and use of longitudinal data systems. 2. Ensure data systems are interoperable within and across agencies and states by adopting or developing common data standards, definitions and language. 3. Protect personally identifiable information through governance policies and practices that promote the security of the information while allowing appropriate data access and sharing.]
Implementing the No Child Left Behind Teacher Requirements
Date CapturedThursday August 23, 2007 08:38 AM
This CEP report by Jennifer McMurrer examines how states and school districts have implemented the No Child Left Behind Act's teacher quality requirements. The report finds that, according to state and district officials, the NCLB highly qualified teacher requirements have had minimal or no impact on student achievement and have not had a major impact on teacher effectiveness. The report also discusses state and district implementation of the federal requirements to equitably distribute experienced, highly qualified teachers among higher and lower poverty schools.
US Department of Education -- Office of Inspector General (OIG) Perspective on the Unsafe School Choice Option
Date CapturedFriday August 10, 2007 08:14 AM
We suggest that the Department and Congress, in considering legislative changes, require states to ensure that their USCO policies meet the following basic requirements: 1) All violent incidents, according to state code, are factored into the PDS determination, without the use of disciplinary action qualifiers; 2) Benchmarks for determining PDS are set at reasonable levels that are supported by objective and reliable data; and 3) PDS are identified based upon the most current year of data. These suggestions are intended to affect immediate improvement of the USCO in its current state. However, based on our audit work and further research, there is an apparent reluctance to fully comply with the USCO provision. Therefore, we are also offering our perspective on more in-depth changes to the provision that should help USCO to be better received by the education community, and therefore, encourage more willing compliance. The lack of incentive to comply with USCO will need to be addressed and resolved in order for the provision to realize its full potential as a tool for improving the level of safety in our nation’s schools.
A Letter from Selected Civil Rights Groups on Multiple Measures
Date CapturedThursday August 09, 2007 11:26 AM
EXCERPT: To counter the narrowing of the curriculum and exclusion of important subjects that has been extensively documented as a consequence of NCLB, the new law should also allow states to include other subjects, using multiple forms of assessment, in an index of school indicators. To ensure strong attention is given to reading and math, these subjects can be weighted more heavily. Graduation rates and grade promotion rates should be given substantial weight in any accountability system. Other relevant indicators of school progress, such as attendance and college admission rates, could be included.
Graduation Matters: Improving Accountability for High School Graduation
Date CapturedThursday August 02, 2007 08:26 AM
By Daria Hall, Assistant Director for K-12 Policy at The Education Trust. "The Education Trust report provides recommendations for policy changes at both the federal and state levels, including the following priorities for NCLB reauthorization: * Crafting meaningful graduation-rate accountability provisions in the law and providing high schools with a greater share of the federal investment in education so they have more resources to meet ambitious improvement goals; * Targeting federal investments to improve high school curriculum and assessments; and *Better directing funds and interventions toward the lowest performing schools to ensure that high-poverty and high-minority schools get their fair share of the tools they need to be successful – strong teachers, high standards and high-quality curriculum and assessments."
Recommendations to Reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act
Date CapturedSunday June 10, 2007 01:20 PM
Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)
Tests criticized as inconsistent
Date CapturedFriday June 08, 2007 08:22 AM
Poughkeepsie Journal reports, "The federal No Child Left Behind Act requires all public schools to improve their scores in state tests by a set percentage each year. What it doesn't determine is the content of those tests. Local critics say this is unfair because standards are literally 'all over the map.'"
Mapping 2005 State Proficiency Standards Onto the NAEP Scales
Date CapturedThursday June 07, 2007 11:04 AM
This report presents the results of applying a methodology for mapping state proficiency standards in reading and mathematics onto the appropriate NAEP scale, employing data from the 2004–05 academic year. The mapping exercise was carried out for both grades 4 and 8. For each of the four subject and grade combinations, the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards vary widely, spanning a range of 60 to 80 NAEP score points. Although there is an essential ambiguity in any attempt to place state standards on a common scale, the ranking of the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards offers an indicator of the relative stringency of those standards. There is a strong negative correlation between the proportions of students meeting the states’ proficiency standards and the NAEP score equivalents to those standards, suggesting that the observed heterogeneity in states’ reported percents proficient can be largely attributed to differences in the stringency of their standards. There is, at best, a weak relationship between the NAEP score equivalents for the state proficiency standard and the states’ average scores on NAEP. Finally, most of the NAEP score equivalents fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Proficient standard, and many fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Basic standard. This report presents the results of applying a methodology for mapping state proficiency standards in reading and mathematics onto the appropriate NAEP scale, employing data from the 2004–05 academic year. The mapping exercise was carried out for both grades 4 and 8. For each of the four subject and grade combinations, the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards vary widely, spanning a range of 60 to 80 NAEP score points. Although there is an essential ambiguity in any attempt to place state standards on a common scale, the ranking of the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards offers an indicator of the relative stringency of those standards. There is a strong negative correlation between the proportions of students meeting the states’ proficiency standards and the NAEP score equivalents to those standards, suggesting that the observed heterogeneity in states’ reported percents proficient can be largely attributed to differences in the stringency of their standards. There is, at best, a weak relationship between the NAEP score equivalents for the state proficiency standard and the states’ average scores on NAEP. Finally, most of the NAEP score equivalents fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Proficient standard, and many fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Basic standard.
Answering the Question That Matters Most: Has Student Achievement Increased Since No Child Left Behind?
Date CapturedWednesday June 06, 2007 09:40 AM
Center on Education Policy Report: Using testing data from all 50 states, this study addresses two key questions in the debate surrounding the No Child Left Behind Act: has student achievement increased and have achievement gaps narrowed since NCLB was enacted in 2002?
How Educators in Three States Are Responding to Standards-Based Accountability Under No Child Left Behind
Date CapturedThursday May 31, 2007 10:42 AM
This research brief describes work done for RAND Education documented in Standards-Based Accountability Under No Child Left Behind: Experiences of Teachers and Administrators in Three States, by Laura S. Hamilton, Brian M. Stecher, Julie A. Marsh, Jennifer Sloan McCombs, Abby Robyn, Jennifer Lin Russell, Scott Naftel, and Heather Barney, MG-589-NSF, 2007, 302 pp., ISBN: 978-0-8330-4149-4. "Key findings: Most superintendents considered three improvement strategies most important: using data for decisionmaking, aligning curriculum with state standards, and focusing on low-performing students. Teachers changed their instruction in both desirable and undesirable ways. Most educators felt challenged by insufficient alignment among state standards, curriculum, and tests. The researchers recommend improving alignment among standards, tests, and curriculum; providing educators with professional development assistance; and exploring ways to measure performance more accurately."
Evaluating 'No Child Left Behind'
Date CapturedFriday May 11, 2007 08:35 AM
The Nation contributor Linda Darling-Hammond, the Charles E. Ducommon Professor of Education at Stanford University writes, "Perhaps the most adverse unintended consequence of NCLB is that it creates incentives for schools to rid themselves of students who are not doing well, producing higher scores at the expense of vulnerable students' education. Studies have found that sanctioning schools based on average student scores leads schools to retain students in grade so that grade-level scores will look better (although these students ultimately do less well and drop out at higher rates), exclude low-scoring students from admissions and encourage such students to transfer or drop out. Recent studies in Massachusetts, New York and Texas show how schools have raised test scores while 'losing' large numbers of low-scoring students."
School Push-Outs: An Urban Case Study
Date CapturedWednesday April 25, 2007 11:46 AM
Elysa Hyman writes, "While the specter of the No Child Left Behind Act continues to loom over our nations’ schools, grassroots organizations, parent groups, attorneys, educators and policymakers must monitor their local school systems and take action if schools are engaging in exclusionary practices. National coalitions must be formed to highlight the unintended effects of the Act and to advocate reform of laws and policies that punish schools for trying to educate all students or that provide incentives for schools to push them out of the building."
Educating Children in Foster Care: The McKinney-Vento and No Child Left Behind Acts
Date CapturedWednesday April 25, 2007 09:44 AM
Casey Family Programs write, "The recommendations, included as part of a comprehensive report released at a congressional briefing, deal with the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act and the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. The recommendations are: Improve school stability by ensuring that the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act applies to all children in out-of-home care, and increase funding for the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act to a level that covers all eligible children. Ensure that children and youth in foster care have access to education-related support services by making them automatically eligible for Title I, Part A services and including them in the set-aside that exists for homeless children. Increase funding for school counselors and mental health services."
PTA Recommendations for Parent Involvement in the Upcoming ESEA-NCLB Reauthorization
Date CapturedMonday April 09, 2007 10:22 AM
As Congress moves towards reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), reauthorized in 2001 as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), PTA has crafted specific recommendations to improve the parent involvement provisions within the law. While ensuring local flexibility, PTA recommends creating a system of accountability designed to encourage parents to be active partners in their child's education.
Joint Statement on Reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)
Date CapturedSunday April 08, 2007 06:39 PM
The groups worked together to offer recommendations in 11 areas, including giving states and schools the flexibility to use "growth models" to gain credit for increasing student achievement; creating rewards and differentiating consequences; supporting meaningful, long-term school reform; and ensuring fair testing of special populations. Recommendations also ask that the reauthorization include a renewed state-federal partnership that will provide states the flexibility to ensure the law works effectively in each and every state.
Building on Results: A Blueprint for Strengthening The No Child Left Behind Act
Date CapturedFriday April 06, 2007 11:04 AM
Building on Results: A Blueprint for Strengthening the No Child Left Behind Act sets forth the policy proposals of Secretary Spellings for reauthorizing the No Child Left Behind Act . U.S. Department of Education, Building on Results: A Blueprint for Strengthening the No Child Left Behind Act, Washington, D.C., 2007.
No Child Left Behind Act: Education Assistance Could Help States Better Measure Progress of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedFriday March 23, 2007 01:44 PM
GAO-07-646T, March 23, 2007. The GAO report recommended that Education (1) support research on accommodations, (2) identify and provide technical support states need to ensure the validity of academic assessments, (3) publish additional guidance on requirements for assessing English language proficiency, and (4) explore ways to provide additional flexibility for measuring annual progress for these students. Education generally agreed with our recommendations and has taken a number of steps to address them.
State Implementation of Supplemental Educational Services under the No Child Left Behind Act
Date CapturedThursday March 15, 2007 08:48 AM
This CEP report was written by Angela Minnici, CEP senior research associate, and Alice P. Bartley, CEP research intern."Key Findings: Limited capacity to monitor -- Many states (38) are unable to monitor 'to a great extent' the quality and effectiveness of SES providers; only 10 states reported being able to do so. The greatest capacity challenges for states in meeting this federal SES monitoring requirement are insufficient numbers of staff and inadequate federal funding. Use of criteria in law -- Almost all (between 47 and 49) of the state education agencies we surveyed reported using the criteria required by NCLB law and federal guidance to review and approve applications from potential supplemental service providers. These criteria are intended to ensure that providers are financially sound, have a record of effectiveness, use research-based strategies, provide services consistent with district instruction, and adhere to health, safety, and civil rights laws. w Frequent updating. NCLB requires states to promote maximum participation of SES providers so that parents have as many choices as possible. Therefore, it is important for states to provide parents and school districts with a current and accurate list of SES providers that they can choose from. On our survey, 20 states said they review new SES provider applications more often than once a year (the minimum required by the NCLB law), and 22 states reported updating their SES provider lists more than once a year. Different reapplication policies -- The reapplication process varies widely by state. In 13 states, SES providers never have to formally reapply, and in 12 states, SES providers have to reapply every year." Nancy Kober, a CEP consultant, edited the report. Jack Jennings, CEP’s president and CEO, and Diane Stark Rentner, CEP’s director of national programs, provided advice and assistance.
NCLB and the Future of Federal Education Policy
Date CapturedSaturday March 10, 2007 09:09 AM
View webcast or download podcast of this Cato Institute event featuring Martin A. Davis, Jr., Senior Writer and Editor, Thomas B. Fordham Foundation; Dan Lips, Education Analyst in Domestic Policy Studies, Heritage Foundation; Andrew J. Rotherham, Co-Director, Education Sector; Dick Armey, Chairman, FreedomWorks, former House Majority Leader; Susan B. Neuman, Professor in Educational Studies, University of Michigan, Former Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education; Neal McCluskey, Policy Analyst, Center for Educational Freedom, Cato Institute; and Andrew J. Coulson, Director, Center for Educational Freedom, Cato Institute.
Helping Children Move from Bad Schools to Good Ones
Date CapturedThursday March 01, 2007 07:10 PM
Richard D. Kahlenberg, The Century Foundation, 6/15/2006. A guide for specific changes to the No Child Left Behind Act that would provide the opportunity for more children to attend economically integrated middle-class public schools.
The Pending Reauthorization of NCLB: An Opportunity to Rethink the Basic Strategy
Date CapturedWednesday February 21, 2007 10:12 AM
By Daniel Koretz, Harvard Graduate School of Education. "This paper argues that debating possible modifications of many NCLB provisions obscures more important problems that the civil rights community cannot afford to ignore. These problems include the lack of knowledge about how to hold schools accountable, key aspects of NCLB that are inconsistent with the current accountability evidence, and the illusion of progress generated by NCLB through its reliance on state assessments."
Domesticating a Revolution: No Child Left Behind Reforms and State Administrative Response
Date CapturedWednesday February 21, 2007 09:58 AM
Sunderman, G. L., & Orfield, G. (2006). Domesticating a revolution: No Child Left Behind reforms and state administrative response. Cambridge, MA: The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University. "This report shows striking good faith at the state administrative level to implement the NCLB requirements but also a striking lack of resources and knowledge to accomplish the extraordinary goals of NCLB. States focused on some of the requirements—data, assessments, and the procedural parts of the law—because these were areas where they had expertise and could actually control. For the most ambitious goals of improving school performance, the law provided few resources, and the previous experience of the states in dealing with much smaller numbers of schools and districts did not prepare them for the size and scope needed under NCLB. When NCLB comes up for re-authorization, the findings from this report would suggest that Congress needs to design a policy that recognizes both the realities of policy possibilities as known by educational professionals and the necessity in a federal system of leading by persuasion and incentives more often than by threats and negative sanctions."
Beyond NCLB
Date CapturedWednesday February 14, 2007 07:58 AM
Commission on No Child Left Behind concludes, "The Commission believes that it is time to ask all teachers to demonstrate their effectiveness in the classroom rather than just their qualifications for entering it. This is a significant change and must be implemented in a way that is fair to teachers. Teachers who are held to this higher standard need and deserve more support. Effective Teachers for All Students, Effective Principals for All Communities."
Commission on NCLB Final Recommendations
Date CapturedTuesday February 13, 2007 08:14 AM
Aspen Institute Webcast -- presentation begins 20 minutes, 39 seconds into video. Former Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson and former Georgia Governor Roy Barnes, Co-Chairs of the the Commission will be joined by: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Chairman, Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions; Senator Mike Enzi, Ranking Member, Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions; Congressman George Miller, Chairman, Committee on Education and Labor; Congressman Howard P. "Buck" McKeon, Ranking Member, Committee on Education and Labor.
Intelligence in the Classroom
Date CapturedTuesday January 16, 2007 06:30 AM
Wall Street Opinion Journal contributor Charles Murray, W.H. Brady Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute opines, "I am among the most emphatic of those who think that the importance of IQ in living a good life is vastly overrated. My point is just this: It is true that many social and economic problems are disproportionately found among people with little education, but the culprit for their educational deficit is often low intelligence. Refusing to come to grips with that reality has produced policies that have been ineffectual at best and damaging at worst."
The Achiever: January 2007 • Vol. 6, No. 1
Date CapturedSaturday January 13, 2007 09:12 PM
What's inside... Fifth Anniversary for No Child Left Behind, Empowering Parents, Spellings Speaks on International Education, Around the Country, Calendar, Q & A Glossary, News Show Celebrates No Child Left Behind, New Design for FREE Web Site. Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Achiever, [January 2007].
Crystal Apple: Education Insiders’ Predictions for No Child Left Behind’s Reauthorization
Date CapturedMonday January 08, 2007 03:37 PM
Thomas Fordham Foundation, Coby Loup and Michael J. Petrilli write, "January 8, 2007, is No Child Left Behind's fifth birthday. This isn't just another milestone to be celebrated (or mourned). It also marks the time that the law is due for an update from Congress. But will NCLB be reauthorized on schedule? And what changes are likely? No one knows for sure, but some might be in a better position than others to cast prognostications: the ubiquitous 'Washington insiders.' So we asked for their predictions. While not a 'representative sample' of thousands, these experts do have inside knowledge and bring a variety of perspectives. They span the ideological and political spectrum and work as lobbyists, association leaders, think tank analysts, and scholars."
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT Education’s Data Improvement Efforts Could Strengthen the Basis for Distributing Title III Funds
Date CapturedFriday December 08, 2006 01:45 PM
GAO 07-140 recommends: To address issues related to Title III allocation, we recommended that Education (1) include clear instructions about how to provide correct and complete state data on the number of students with limited English proficiency assessed annually for proficiency in English; (2) develop and implement a transparent methodology for determining the relative accuracy of the two allowable sources of data—ACS or state data on the number of students with limited English proficiency assessed annually—for Title III allocations to states; and (3) seek authority to use statistical methodologies to reduce the volatility associated with the ACS data.
The Charter State Option: Charting a Course Toward Federalism in Education
Date CapturedWednesday December 06, 2006 05:40 PM
Dan Lips, Education Analyst, Evan Feinberg, Research Assistant in Domestic Policy Studies, and Jennifer A. Marshall, Director of Domestic Policy Studies at The Heritage Foundation conclude, "Beginning in 2007, policymakers should steer a course toward restoring state control of education by enacting a charter state option. Congress should allow all states to enter into an alternative contrac­tual arrangement with the federal government in which they would be freed from federal program mandates while taking responsibility for results. Such federalism would create an environment in which promising state and local education strate­gies can flourish."
How the No Child Left Behind Act Punishes Schools with Disadvantaged Students
Date CapturedMonday December 04, 2006 11:14 AM
This column asks whether NCLB accomplishes its objective, based on a recent study of Kansas and Missouri by William Duncombe, Anna Lukemeyer, and John Yinger, "As discussed in my previous column, a state can lower the share of its schools that are subject to federal sanctions by lowering its student performance targets. This strategy will not, however, save schools with high concentrations of disadvantaged students, which are, for reasons outside their control, the schools most likely to be sanctioned. However, a state could help to resolve the unfair treatment of schools with concentrated disadvantage by altering its own aid formulas. Existing state aid formulas do not adequately recognize the higher cost of education in these schools, but they could easily be adjusted to do so. The federal government could also encourage this type of response by revising NCLB to reward the states that do the best job of focusing their aid on the neediest school districts. Another possible reform to NCLB would be to increase both the amount of federal funds and the extent to which these funds are focused on the schools with the highest concentration of disadvantaged students."
The No Child Left Behind Act: Have Federal Funds Been Left Behind?
Date CapturedMonday November 20, 2006 01:57 PM
"The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) imposes new requirements on state education systems and provides additional education funding. This paper estimates education cost functions, predicts the spending required to support NCLB standards, and compares this spending with the funding available through NCLB. This analysis is conducted for Kansas and Missouri, which have similar education environments but very different standards. We find that new federal funding is sufficient to support very low standards for student performance, but cannot come close to funding high standards without implausibly large increases in schooldistrict efficiency. Because of the limited federal funding and the severe penalties in NCLB when a school does not meet its state’s standards, states have a strong incentive to keep their standards low. NCLB needs to be reformed so that it will encourage high standards." *The authors are Professor of Public Administration, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University; Associate Professor of Public Administration, University of Nevada at Los Vegas; and Professor of Public Administration and Economics, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University, respectively. We are grateful to David Sjoquist for helpful comments. 1 1. Introduction The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) both imposes mandates on states and gives them more federal education funding. The authors are William Duncombe, Anna Lukemeyer and John Yinger, Professor of Public Administration, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University; Associate Professor of Public Administration, University of Nevada at Los Vegas; and Professor of Public Administration and Economics, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University, respectively.
How the No Child Left Behind Act Undermines Education Standards
Date CapturedMonday November 20, 2006 01:36 PM
EFAP Director John Yinger, in a monthly column writes, "The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) has brought unprecedented federal involvement in elementary and secondary education. More specifically, NCLB imposes strict new requirements on state education systems and provides additional education funding."
The Accuracy and Effectiveness of Adequate Yearly Progress, NCLB's School Evaluation System
Date CapturedFriday October 06, 2006 07:06 PM
William J. Mathis writes, "Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is the key element of the accountability system mandated by the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This report reveals that AYP in its 2006 form as the prime indicator of academic achievement is not supported by reliable evidence. Expecting all children to reach mastery level on their state’s standardized tests by 2014, the fundamental requirement of AYP, is unrealistic. The growth model and other improvement proposals now on the table do not have sufficient power to resolve the underlying problems of the system. In addition, the program, whether conceived as implementation costs or remedial costs, is significantly underfunded in a way that will disproportionately penalize schools attended by the neediest children. Further, the curriculum is being narrowed to focus on tested areas at the cost of other vital educational purposes." Mathis, William J., Rutland Northeast Supervisory Union, University of Vermont.
It Takes a Parent: Transforming Education in the Wake of the No Child Left Behind Act
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 01:07 AM
"With the goal of demonstrating the importance of parental involvement as a key strategy for improving student success, this report provides recommendations for education leaders and policymakers. It focuses on three major strands that are crucial to effective parental involvement: 1. Information: The opportunities and challenges of parental awareness about student and school performance; 2. Engagement: The importance of meaningful parental engagement with school officials and teachers; and 3. Advocacy: The critical role that effective parent advocacy, based on good information and informed engagement, plays in student and school performance." The report was produced by Appleseed, in coordination with several other key law firms and groups. Law firm, Holland & Knight, coordinated and carried out much of the research and drafted the final report, with assistance in two states from volunteers from DLA Piper. The National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Columbia University and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP played key roles in gathering and assessing information.
The 38th Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools
Date CapturedTuesday August 22, 2006 10:47 AM
(September 2006) By LOWELL C. ROSE executive director emeritus of Phi Delta Kappa International and ALEC M. GALLUP, co-chairman, with George Gallup, Jr., of the Gallup Organization, Princeton, N.J. "In probing the public’s opinions of NCLB, the PDK/Gallup poll finds that there is widespread support for the law’s goals -- closing the achievement gap between African American and Latino students and their white peers and improving educational outcomes for all students -- but broad disagreement with its specific strategies. When asked whether testing students in only English and math, as currently required by NCLB, can give a fair picture of a school, 81% of the public say no. And 78% are worried that the law’s focus on these two subjects will mean less emphasis on other subjects. The poll finds that two-thirds of those surveyed oppose measuring school success by the percentage of students passing a single statewide test, while 81% prefer measuring the improvement that students make during the year."
No Child Left Behind Act: Education Actions Needed to Improve Local Implementation and State Evaluation of Supplemental Educational Services (full study)
Date CapturedSaturday August 05, 2006 10:36 AM
GAO-06-758 August 4, 2006. "GAO examined (1) how SES [supplemental educational services] participation changed between school years 2003-2004 and 2004-2005; (2) how SES providers are working with districts to deliver SES; (3) how states are monitoring and evaluating SES; and (4) how the Department of Education (Education) monitors and supports state implementation of SES."
States, Feds Partner on English Testing
Date CapturedWednesday August 02, 2006 07:45 PM
Infozine reports, "Twenty-four states [including New York] are being invited to work with the U.S. Department of Education to develop acceptable math and reading tests for students with limited English proficiency (LEP). Eighteen were chosen because a review last month found their testing systems, particularly those for LEP students, did not meet standards of the No Child Left Behind law. Six states with approved systems were invited to lend their expertise."
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT: Assistance from Education Could Help States Better Measure Progress of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedThursday July 27, 2006 09:57 AM
GAO July 2006 study, "The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLBA) focused attention on the academic achievement of more than 5 million students with limited English proficiency. Obtaining valid test results for these students is challenging, given their language barriers. This report describes (1) the extent to which these students are meeting annual academic progress goals, (2) what states have done to ensure the validity of their academic assessments, (3) what states are doing to ensure the validity of their English language proficiency assessments, and (4) how the U.S. Department of Education (Education) is supporting states’ efforts to meet NCLBA’s assessment requirements for these students."
AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT FREE TUTORING SERVICES UNDER THE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT IN NEW YORK CITY: A FOCUS ON ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Date CapturedWednesday July 26, 2006 11:18 AM
Advocates for Children of New York, June, 2006. "This policy brief examines the status of SES in NYC as of the 2004-2005 school year (the most recent year for which data is available) and compares, where possible, results from the first year of implementation. This report also analyzes the extent to which ELLs are eligible based on their attendance in designated schools, their enrollment in SES, and SES providers’ capacity to serve these students."
Echo Chamber: The National Education Associations's Campaign Against NCLB
Date CapturedTuesday July 11, 2006 01:59 PM
By Joe Williams. "This Education Sector report examines the financial relationships between the NEA and a number of organizations that have been sharply critical of NCLB."
Is the No Child Left Behind Act Working? The Reliability of How States Track Achievement
Date CapturedFriday June 30, 2006 10:00 AM
This new PACE working paper traces how 12 diverse states have reported on student achievement trends, 1992-2005. Trend lines often follow jagged, saw-tooth patterns over time -- as state education officials change testing companies, shift the bar defining "proficient" performance, and teachers spend more time on test preparation activities. The PACE research team also confirmed earlier findings that many states report much higher shares of fourth-graders "proficient" in reading and math, compared with the percentage of students found to be proficient under the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Following the January 2002 passage of the No Child Left Behind Act, states have continued to report annual gains in reading proficiency, while the federal assessment indicates that fourth-graders' performance has flatten-out. Together, these factors lead to state test score patterns that are difficult for parents and local educators to interpret. Recommendations are advanced for bringing state and federal testing systems into closer alignment.
Tracking Achievement Gaps and Assessing the Impact of NCLB on the Gaps: An In-depth Look into National and State Reading and Math Outcome Trends
Date CapturedWednesday June 14, 2006 09:48 AM
By Jaekyung Lee Graduate School of Education, State University of New York at Buffalo. Foreword by Gary Orfield, June 2006. This report compares the findings from the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) to state assessment results and concludes that that high stakes testing and sanctions required by NCLB are not working as planned under the NCLB. The findings contradict claims of the Bush Administration and some previous studies that showed positive results under NCLB.
Evaluation of the Title I Accountability Systems and School Improvement Efforts (TASSIE)
Date CapturedMonday May 08, 2006 10:22 AM
This report is based on surveys of a nationally representative sample of schools and school districts that are working towards the NCLB goal of student proficiency by 2013-14. The study was commissioned to better understand how states, districts and schools are implementing the Title I accountability provisions of NCLB. SRI findings for 2002-03, the first full year of NCLB implementation, show there were significant gaps between the NCLB vision and the implementation of standards and accountability systems in schools nationwide. While there was broader support for NCLB in 2003-04 than in 2002-2003, the likelihood of reaching proficiency benchmarks varied greatly among states and school districts. The chances that a school would be "identified for improvement" were much higher for schools in districts that were large, urban and poor.
Shape of the Nation - - Status of Physical Education
Date CapturedTuesday May 02, 2006 08:03 PM
Read the Shape of the Nation Report -- information about the status of physical education in each state and the District of Columbia in the following areas: time requirements, exemptions/waivers and substitutions, class size, standards, curriculum and instruction, student assessment, teacher certification.
National Report: Open to the Public: The Public Speaks Out On No Child Left Behind
Date CapturedMonday May 01, 2006 11:18 AM
Public hearings were held in Austin, Boston, Chicago, Columbus, Detroit, New York City, Orlando, Pittsburgh, and San Francisco. The hearings represent the second of three sets of national forums to be held by PEN and regional partners to help inform the law's reauthorization in 2007. Read report here.
The Unraveling of No Child Left Behind: How Negotiated Changes Transform the Law
Date CapturedTuesday February 14, 2006 11:08 AM
By Gail L. Sunderman, Foreword by Gary Orfield. Harvard University's Civil Rights Project, 2006. This report documents the changes states have made to their accountability plans and examines how these policy shifts affect the meaning of accountability and who benefits and loses from the changes
Margins of Error: The Testing Industry in the No Child Left Behind Era
Date CapturedMonday February 06, 2006 09:55 PM
2006. Author: Thomas Toch The report provides recommendations for both state and federal policymakers to strengthen the nation's testing infrastructure.
Finance Project NCLB and Afterschool Learning $$$
Date CapturedMonday November 21, 2005 04:04 PM
Finance Project publication on NCLB and afterschool learning.

New York State

NEW YORK STATE’S Essential Elements: Schools-to-Watch Recognition Program for 2011-12
Date CapturedTuesday December 21, 2010 12:31 AM
New York State’s Essential Elements: Schools-to-Watch (EE: STW) recognition program seeks to identify and recognize diverse, high-performing model middle-level schools that demonstrate what all schools with middle-level grades should be and are capable of achieving.

NYC Schools

THE CITY OF NEW YORK OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER BUREAU OF MANAGEMENT AUDIT : AUDIT REPORT ON THE MONITORING AND TRACKING OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS BY THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Date CapturedThursday July 26, 2007 09:55 AM
MD06-073A -- June 29, 2007. "Based on our findings, we make nine recommendations, five of which are listed below. DOE should: Develop and enforce written formal policies and procedures to ensure that services are provided according to the provisions of each student’s IEP. Develop policies to ensure that all attendance forms and summaries are maintained as evidence of services provided. Ensure that providers fill in all required information on the special education attendance forms and sign the forms as certification of the delivery of services. Ensure that supervisory review of attendance records is performed and documented. Institute a control (e.g., periodically reconcile special education attendance forms with general education attendance forms) to help ensure that the days that services are provided are accurately recorded."
SCHOOLS BRUSHING UP ON THE ARTS
Date CapturedTuesday July 24, 2007 07:02 AM
NY Post Chuck Bennett reports, "'I didn't want the arts to be a throwaway. I didn't want the arts to be some add-on, some feel-good thing. I think arts education is critical,' Klein [NYC schools chancellor] said. He added that $250 million in this year's school budget will go toward arts education, including the hiring of 141 new teachers. More students also will be eligible to receive an Arts-Endorsed Regents Honors diploma for taking a concentration in arts classes."
Chancellor Answers Critics on School Financing Data
Date CapturedWednesday July 18, 2007 08:34 AM
NY Times reports, "The city (New York City) this month said that it would use nearly half the funds to reduce class sizes. Detailed figures released by the city yesterday showed how much extra financing school districts and individual schools would receive, but still did not specify where class sizes would be cut. Critics say the distribution raises the question of whether schools that are relatively high-performing are getting too much of the money."
It all adds up to success
Date CapturedWednesday June 13, 2007 10:15 AM
NY Daily News opines, "Next year, Bloomberg and Klein are giving teachers the ability to closely track how well students are learning, so those who lag can get immediate special attention. And the mayor and chancellor are giving parents report cards that will grade how individual schools are working. The trends are moving in the right direction after years of stagnation, and the innate abilities of thousands of kids are finally being unlocked."
Cash is cool: Mike
Date CapturedSaturday June 09, 2007 08:12 AM
NY Daily News reports, "Mayor Bloomberg defended a controversial proposal to pay kids for high test scores yesterday, but said there are no specific plans to make it happen."
HS doesn't like money? I'll check it out - Randi
Date CapturedThursday May 10, 2007 08:57 AM
NY Daily News reports, "Though the school's students come from poor families, most are academically successful and therefore unable to benefit from Title I unless parents and teachers vote for a 'schoolwide option' to free up the cash. Parents voted unanimously to do so, but most teachers are opposed. The school could lose as much $70,000 again next year."
BAT BAN OFF BASE: SCHOOLS
Date CapturedSunday November 12, 2006 07:37 AM
NY Post reports, "The Catholic High Schools' Athletic Association sent a letter to all 51 council members urging them not to vote for the measure, which would require all high schools in the city to use wooden bats for safety reasons."
New York City Considers Plan to Let Outsiders Run Schools
Date CapturedThursday October 05, 2006 03:19 AM
NY Times reports, "Randi Weingarten, the teachers’ union president, urged the administration to make its discussions more public. 'I have been concerned about the sub rosa debate on whether to privatize the management of the school system for quite a while,' she said. 'On an issue that is this transcendent there has to be a real public debate.'”
Boston schools win top education award; Jersey City a finalist
Date CapturedTuesday September 19, 2006 08:48 PM
AP reports, "The Boston public school system won the nation's largest prize in public education Tuesday, earning $500,000 in college scholarships for making steady gains in the classroom. Jersey City's school system was a finalist for the award and will receive $125,000."The other four finalists will each receive $125,00. They are Bridgeport Public Schools in Connecticut, Jersey City School District in New Jersey, Miami Dade County Public Schools and the New York City Department of Education.
New York City Independent Budget Office Fiscal Brief, July 2006
Date CapturedTuesday August 01, 2006 07:27 AM
By Paul Lopatto. Study finds, "THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK, commonly known as CUNY, is the largest urban public university system in the country, with approximately 450,000 students. Until the city’s fiscal crisis in the 1970s, CUNY charged no tuition. But even with the addition of tuition revenue, CUNY has faced ongoing challenges to its operating budget. CUNY officials say these challenges have hampered their ability to expand and improve the university’s educational programs.IBO’s review of CUNY funding since 1989 finds that the university system has become increasingly reliant on tuition revenue even as it faces year-to-year uncertainty in the sources of its funding and costs to its students."
AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT FREE TUTORING SERVICES UNDER THE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT IN NEW YORK CITY: A FOCUS ON ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Date CapturedWednesday July 26, 2006 11:18 AM
Advocates for Children of New York, June, 2006. "This policy brief examines the status of SES in NYC as of the 2004-2005 school year (the most recent year for which data is available) and compares, where possible, results from the first year of implementation. This report also analyzes the extent to which ELLs are eligible based on their attendance in designated schools, their enrollment in SES, and SES providers’ capacity to serve these students."
Parents Dismissed: An Analysis of Manhattan"s Community Education Councils and the New York City Department of Education's Role in Engaging Parent Leaders
Date CapturedFriday July 21, 2006 12:08 AM
"This report on Manhattan’s Community Education Councils (CEC) finds significant failures by the City’s Department of Education (DOE) and violations of state law as it pertains to their obligations to adequately provide support and training for the parent councils."

NYS Education Department

NEW YORK STATE’S Essential Elements: Schools-to-Watch Recognition Program for 2011-12
Date CapturedTuesday December 21, 2010 12:31 AM
New York State’s Essential Elements: Schools-to-Watch (EE: STW) recognition program seeks to identify and recognize diverse, high-performing model middle-level schools that demonstrate what all schools with middle-level grades should be and are capable of achieving.
News & Notes
Date CapturedWednesday May 09, 2007 10:26 PM
Johanna Duncan-Poitier, Senior Deputy Commissioner of Education - P-16, May 8, 2007.
LATEST INFORMATION ON THE NEW YORK 2007-2008 STATE BUDGET
Date CapturedThursday April 05, 2007 10:28 AM
New & Notes
Taking a look at longer classes
Date CapturedMonday September 25, 2006 05:19 AM
Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin "A main roadblock to extending the year is financial concerns. Any move to add days to the school year, or hours to the school day, would have to be negotiated with labor unions, including teachers' associations, officials said. And this would mean higher labor costs. 'If you extend the school year, I would assume people would expect addition compensation,' Busch said."
2004-05 Annual Report on the Status of Charter Schools in New York State
Date CapturedFriday July 21, 2006 10:49 AM
"This report provides data required by §2857(3) of the Education Law and covers the 2004-05 school year, during which a total of 61 charter schools were open for instruction. Of these 61 schools, 16 were chartered by the Board of Regents, 32 were chartered by the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York ('SUNY'), 11 were chartered by the Chancellor of the New York City Public Schools, and two were chartered by the Board of Education of the Buffalo City School District. Twenty-one had management companies as partners."

Opt-Out

OPT-OUT PROTECT KIDS
Date CapturedSunday December 30, 2012 03:21 PM
Welcome to The Opt Out of Standardized Tests Site!
Date CapturedSaturday August 04, 2012 07:05 PM
This site was created to collect and share information on state by state rules and experiences related to opting out of standardized tests. This is an open community for any parent, student, or educator interested in finding or sharing opt out information, irrespective of personal decisions regarding political party, religion, or choice of public or non public education.
Parent Right to Opt Out Lawsuit Emerges
Date CapturedSaturday August 04, 2012 07:01 PM
ACLU is interested in supporting any parents whose children received a penalty/threats for opting out of testing. If you want to participate in the complaint please share the following: your story; permission to join in on the ACLU complaint; your return address; a signature on a hard copy.

Parent Involvement

FLORIDA HB 543
Date CapturedTuesday January 31, 2012 07:09 PM
Bill to be entitled: An act relating to parental involvement and accountability in public schools; creating s. 1008.347, F.S.; providing purpose to provide information and tools to parents of prekindergarten through grade 5 students and to set minimum standards for parental involvement; specifying causes for student underachievement; requiring shared information between teachers, schools, and parents; requiring prekindergarten through grade 5 teachers to evaluate parental involvement and send a parental involvement evaluation to parents under certain circumstances; requiring adoption of a process to dispute a parental involvement evaluation; requiring reports on parental involvement evaluations by district school boards and the Department of Education; providing for implementation;.
Engaging Parents in Education: Lessons From Five Parental Information And Resource Centers
Date CapturedThursday August 02, 2007 12:31 PM
The purpose of this guide, "Engaging Parents in Education: Lessons From Five Parental Information and Resources Centers," is to explain "how to" strategies that the Parent Information Resource Centers (PIRCs) use to improve or expand their parental involvement programs in public schools.
PTA leader has strong message
Date CapturedMonday July 30, 2007 08:31 AM
Poughkeepsie Journal opines, "Men concerned about how schools handle issues that stretch well beyond classrooms should heed Saylors' call to get more involved by joining the PTA. You don't have to have a child in school to become involved. Membership is open to anybody concerned about the health, well-being and education of American children."
PTA Recommendations for Parent Involvement in the Upcoming ESEA-NCLB Reauthorization
Date CapturedMonday April 09, 2007 10:22 AM
As Congress moves towards reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), reauthorized in 2001 as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), PTA has crafted specific recommendations to improve the parent involvement provisions within the law. While ensuring local flexibility, PTA recommends creating a system of accountability designed to encourage parents to be active partners in their child's education.
Why We Fight: How Public Schools Cause Social Conflict
Date CapturedThursday March 08, 2007 02:48 PM
Neal McCluskey, policy analyst at the Center for Educational Freedom writes, "This paper reexamines the accepted story about public schooling’s role in creating unity and upholding democracy. First, it documents outbreaks over the past academic year of the most divisive kinds of public school conflicts— those pitting people’s deeply held values against each other—and makes clear that such combat is inevitable when everyone is required to pay for an official school system that only the most politically powerful control. Next, it examines the historical record of American education and finds that conflict and division have long been part of public schooling. Finally, the report identifies the true foundations of the nation’s unity and success, and explains why the only system of education that can effectively support a free society is one that is itself grounded in freedom."
'It's gotten better, but it's bad'
Date CapturedMonday January 15, 2007 09:01 AM
Chicago Sun-Times reports, "In schools with high concentrations of Hispanic students, it has long been common to see empty seats in class the week or two before and after Christmas, when immigrant families take their kids to visit relatives back home. But parent outreach efforts at the Chicago Public Schools, turmoil in Mexico and Latin America, and increased border security have meant fewer kids are missing days this school year, say teachers and administrators."
Report Card on American Education: A State by State Analysis: 1983-1984 to 2003-2004
Date CapturedTuesday January 02, 2007 07:33 AM
This American Legislative Exchange Council study ranks the educational performance of the school systems in the states, and the District of Columbia according to several criteria including National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), SAT, and ACT scores. Author Andrew T. LeFevre concludes, "As more and more parents see that they can—and should— have a choice in their child’s education, it causes more and more leaks in the dam that has been holding back real educational reform. And soon, the educational establishment will run out of fi ngers to plug those leaks and then the fl ood of educational reform and school choice will finally be free to flow all across this great nation—bringing liberation to many that have struggled far too long to escape from an educational system that has failed them all too often."
Trends in the Use of School Choice: 1993 to 2003
Date CapturedTuesday November 28, 2006 10:27 AM
"This NCES report uses data from the National Household Surveys Program (NHES) to present trends that focus on the use of and users of public schools (assigned and chosen), private schools (church- and non church-related), and homeschoolers between 1993 and 2003. The percentage of students enrolled in their assigned public school decreased from 80 percent to 74 percent between 1993 and 2003, while this decrease was nearly offset by an increase in chosen public school enrollment from 11 to 15 percent between 1993 and 2003. During this same time period, enrollment in church-related private schools remained stable at 8 percent and enrollment in non church-related private schools increased from 1.6 to 2.4 percent. This report also presents data on parental perceptions of public school choice availability and associations between the public and private school types children were enrolled in and parental satisfaction with and involvement in the schools. About one-half of all students have parents who reported that public school choice was available in their community, with one-quarter of students attending assigned public schools having parents who considered enrolling them in a school other than the one they were currently attending, while 17 percent of all students and 27 percent of Black students attended a school other than their parent’s first-choice school. Generally, there were no parental involvement differences detected between students enrolled in assigned and chosen public schools. Parents of students in private schools reported more direct involvement in their children’s schools than parents of students enrolled in other types of schools."
It Takes a Parent: Transforming Education in the Wake of the No Child Left Behind Act
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 01:07 AM
"With the goal of demonstrating the importance of parental involvement as a key strategy for improving student success, this report provides recommendations for education leaders and policymakers. It focuses on three major strands that are crucial to effective parental involvement: 1. Information: The opportunities and challenges of parental awareness about student and school performance; 2. Engagement: The importance of meaningful parental engagement with school officials and teachers; and 3. Advocacy: The critical role that effective parent advocacy, based on good information and informed engagement, plays in student and school performance." The report was produced by Appleseed, in coordination with several other key law firms and groups. Law firm, Holland & Knight, coordinated and carried out much of the research and drafted the final report, with assistance in two states from volunteers from DLA Piper. The National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Columbia University and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP played key roles in gathering and assessing information.
School and Parent Interaction by Household Language and Poverty Status: 2002-03
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 03:35 PM
NCES: Language minority parents may face a number of challenges when trying to communicate or become involved with their child’s school. This Issue Brief describes school-to-home communication practices and opportunities for parent involvement at school as reported by parents of U.S. school-age students from primarily English- and primarily Spanish-speaking households during the 2002–03 school year. Among the findings: A greater percentage of students in English-speaking households than in Spanish-speaking households had parents who reported receiving personal notes or e-mails about the student; receiving newsletters, memos, or notices addressed to all parents; opportunities to attend general meetings; opportunities to attend school events; and chances to volunteer. Differences were still apparent after taking poverty status into account. This Issue Brief was prepared by Christine Enyeart, Juliet Diehl, Gillian Hampden-Thompson, and Marion Scotchmer of the American Institutes for Research.
Parents Dismissed: An Analysis of Manhattan"s Community Education Councils and the New York City Department of Education's Role in Engaging Parent Leaders
Date CapturedFriday July 21, 2006 12:08 AM
"This report on Manhattan’s Community Education Councils (CEC) finds significant failures by the City’s Department of Education (DOE) and violations of state law as it pertains to their obligations to adequately provide support and training for the parent councils."
Fathers of U.S. Children Born in 2001: Findings from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort
Date CapturedWednesday July 19, 2006 10:33 AM
This NCES publication presents information on specific demographic characteristics of resident and nonresident biological fathers’ involvement in pregnancy and birth, fathers’ attitudes about fathering, and father involvement. By Kirsten Ellingsen, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Christine Winquist Nord, Westat; Frank Avenilla, Education Statistics Services Institute; Emily Rosenthal, Teachers College, Columbia University; Jerry West, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Poverty

New Kids on the Block
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 10:27 AM
By Lisa Sanbonmatsu, Jeffrey R. Kling, Greg J. Duncan and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn write, "In the end, we were surprised and disappointed by the inability of the Moving to Opportunity experiment to help poor children succeed in school. After following more than 5,000 MTO children over five years, we can offer some tentative conclusions about policy interventions designed to improve student performance. Moving poor families to neighborhoods that, while less poor, have schools that are only marginally better than those in the original neighborhoods is unlikely to solve the children’s academic problems. Interventions might be more profitably focused on factors more directly related to the child, family, and school. The question remains whether these same conclusions will hold after a full decade of living in new neighborhoods, especially for the youngest children who, because of the MTO program, will have spent their entire lives outside of public housing projects. We will be collecting additional data next year and look forward to learning more."
Demographic and School Characteristics of Students Receiving Special Education in the Elementary Grades
Date CapturedFriday July 27, 2007 09:48 AM
Findings from the analysis indicate that for the cohort of students beginning kindergarten in 1998, specific learning disabilities and speech or language impairments were the most prevalent primary disabilities over the grades studied. The percentage of the student cohort receiving special education grew from 4.1 percent in kindergarten to 11.9 percent of students in fifth grade. The results also indicate that higher percentages of boys than girls and of poor students than nonpoor students received special education.
Dropout Rates in the United States: 2004
Date CapturedThursday December 07, 2006 10:17 AM
This report builds upon a series of National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988. It presents estimates of rates for 2004, and provides data about trends in dropout and completion rates over the last three decades (1972–2004), including characteristics of dropouts and completers in these years. Among other findings, the report shows that in students living in low-income families were approximately four times more likely to drop out of high school between 2003 and 2004 than were their peers from high-income families. Focusing on indicators of on-time graduation from public high schools, the averaged freshman graduation rate for the 3 most recent years for which data are available shows an increase from 72.6 percent for 2001–02 to 73.9 percent for 2002–03 to 74.3 percent for 2003–04. Laird, J., DeBell, M., and Chapman, C. (2006). Dropout Rates in the United States: 2004 (NCES 2007-024). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved December 7, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
The Shape Of The Starting Line
Date CapturedTuesday June 27, 2006 09:39 AM
Produced By: Tom Sgouros. This report contains a review of some important research findings about the links between poverty and academic success, and research relevant to several popular school reform proposals. It also covers matters relating to professional practice, school conditions, literacy and early childhood education.
"Resilient and Reaching for More: The Challenges and Benefits of Higher Education for Welfare Participants and their Children"
Date CapturedTuesday June 20, 2006 09:44 PM
This Institute for Women's Policy Research report examines both the challenges and pay-offs associated with acquiring higher education under the tight constraints of welfare reform.
The Choice is Ours: Expanding Educational Opportunity for all Twin Cities Children
Date CapturedWednesday May 24, 2006 08:40 AM
A new report by the Institute on Race & Poverty (IRP) at the University of Minnesota reveals the disturbing extent of school segregation in the Twin Cities region. The authors of the report envision a brighter future if an already successful school choice program is expanded. The report, “The Choice Is Ours: Expanding Educational Opportunity for all Twin Cities Children,” describes how economic and racial segregation harms children and the region.

PPRA

FTC CONSUMER ALERT: Protecting Your Child's Personal Information at School
Date CapturedFriday September 02, 2011 06:10 PM
[Ask your child's school about its directory information policy. Student directory information can include your child's name, address, date of birth, telephone number, email address, and photo. FERPA requires schools to notify parents and guardians about their school directory policy, and give you the right to opt-out of the release of directory information to third parties. It's best to put your request in writing and keep a copy for your files. If you don't opt-out, directory information may be available not only to the people in your child's class and school, but also to the general public.]
Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO)
Date CapturedWednesday November 04, 2009 05:04 PM
The mission of the Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO) is to meet the needs of the Department's primary customers--learners of all ages--by effectively implementing two laws that seek to ensure student and parental rights in education: the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA).
Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA)
Date CapturedFriday October 30, 2009 11:00 AM
Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) The Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232h; 34 CFR Part 98) applies to programs that receive funding from the U.S. Department of Education (ED). PPRA is intended to protect the rights of parents and students .
Education Marketing Group/ECRA LAWSUIT RE: SALE OF STUDENT INFORMATION
Date CapturedFriday October 30, 2009 10:15 AM
Parties Subject to Order ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED that this Consent Order and Judgment shall extend to Student Marketing Group, Inc. (“SMG”) and Educational Research Center of America, Inc. (“ERCA”), their successors, assignees, officers, agents, representatives, affiliates and employees and any other person under their direction or control, whether acting individually or in concert with others or through any corporate entity or device through which they may now or hereafter act or conduct business (collectively “respondents”).

Privacy

E P I C A l e r t -- Volume 14.16 -- August 10, 2007
Date CapturedMonday August 13, 2007 09:53 AM
Table of Contents: [1] Congress Enacts Sweeping Changes to Federal Wiretap Laws [2] New Law Strengthens Privacy Oversight [3] Canadian Group Urges Investigation of Google-DoubleClick Merger [4] Homeland Security Revamps Traveler Profiling Programs [5] Senate Passes Leahy-Cornyn Open Government Bill [6] News in Brief [7] EPIC Bookstore: "Complete Guide to Security and Privacy Metrics" [8] Upcoming Conferences and Events
Search Privacy Practices
Date CapturedSunday August 12, 2007 08:09 AM
Center for Democracy and Technology--a D.C.-based think tank--released a report (pdf) on the privacy policies of major search engines. Report includes recommendations including, "No amount of self-regulation in the search privacy space can replace the need for a comprehensive federal privacy law to protect consumers from bad actors. With consumers sharing more data than ever before online, the time has come to harmonize our nation’s privacy laws into a simple, flexible framework."
Guidelines for Working with Law Enforcement Agencies
Date CapturedWednesday August 08, 2007 12:15 PM
By Michael Corn. EQ -- Volume 30 Number 3 2007. Checklist: * Create a policy to address the handling of all legal documents. * Form a team consisting of the security officer, legal counsel, and campus police. * Put campus legal counsel on your telephone speed-dial. * Meet with provost and/or chancellor to discuss law enforcement requests and investigations. * Review and document the salient features of your environment, including your institutional policies on data release and retention. * Understand your obligations with regard to confidentiality. * Discuss with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation whom you wish to inform of the investigation and why. * Work with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation to review what they are looking for and what will not be useful to them. * Develop internal procedures that control the materials and information of legally restricted information. Buy a safe for storing legal materials. * Work with law enforcement agents to better understand your environment and narrow the scope of information requests.
Understanding Denial-of-Service Attacks
Date CapturedThursday August 02, 2007 12:26 PM
Cyber Security Tip ST04-015 -- In a denial-of-service (DoS) attack, an attacker attempts to prevent legitimate users from accessing information or services. By targeting your computer and its network connection, or the computers and network of the sites you are trying to use, an attacker may be able to prevent you from accessing email, web sites, online accounts (banking, etc.), or other services that rely on the affected computer.
Teens, Privacy and Online Social Networks: How teens manage their online identities and personal information in the age of MySpace
Date CapturedWednesday June 27, 2007 08:26 PM
Pew Internet Study by Amanda Lenhart and Mary Madden, "While many teens post their first name and photos on their profiles, they rarely post information on public profiles they believe would help strangers actually locate them such as their full name, home phone number or cell phone number. At the same time, nearly two-thirds of teens with profiles (63%) believe that a motivated person could eventually identify them from the information they publicly provide on their profiles. A new report, based on a survey and a series of focus groups conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project examine how teens, particularly those with profiles online, make decisions about disclosing or shielding personal information. Some 55% of online teens have profiles and most of them restrict access to their profile in some way. Of those with profiles, 66% say their profile is not visible to all internet users. Of those whose profile can be accessed by anyone online, nearly half (46%) say they give at least some false information. Teens post fake information to protect themselves and also to be playful or silly."
Cyberbullying and Online Teens
Date CapturedWednesday June 27, 2007 08:21 PM
Pew Internet Study --by Amanda Lenhart . "About one third (32%) of all teenagers who use the internet say they have been targets of a range of annoying and potentially menacing online activities – such as receiving threatening messages; having their private emails or text messages forwarded without consent; having an embarrassing picture posted without permission; or having rumors about them spread online."
2007 Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) Breach Report
Date CapturedTuesday June 12, 2007 08:58 AM
View breaches of records at education institutions in 2007.

Privacy Harm

The Boundaries of Privacy Harm
Date CapturedSaturday July 17, 2010 07:00 PM
M. Ryan Calo -- Stanford Law School -- July 16, 2010 -- Abstract: [This Essay describes the outer boundaries and core properties of privacy harm. Properly understood, privacy harm falls into just two categories. The subjective category of privacy harm is the unwanted perception of observation. This category describes unwelcome mental states—anxiety, embarrassment, fear—that stem from the belief that one is being watched or monitored. Examples include everything from a landlord listening in on his tenants to generalized government surveillance. The objective category of privacy harm is the unanticipated or coerced use of information concerning a person against that person. These are negative, external actions justified by reference to personal information. Examples include identity theft, the leaking of classified information that reveals an undercover agent, and the use of a drunk-driving suspect’s blood as evidence against him. The subjective and objective categories of privacy harm are distinct but related. Just as assault is the apprehension of battery, so is the unwanted perception of observation largely an apprehension of information-driven injury. The categories represent, respectively, the anticipation and consequence of a loss of control over personal information. The approach offers several advantages. It uncouples privacy harm from privacy violations, demonstrating that no person need commit a privacy violation for privacy harm to occur (and vice versa). It creates a “limiting principle” capable of revealing when another value—autonomy or equality, for instance—is more directly at stake. It also creates a “rule of recognition” that permits the identification of a privacy harm when no other harm is apparent. Finally, the approach permits the sizing and redress of privacy harm in novel ways.]

Professional Development

Forum Curriculum for Improving Education Data: A Resource for Local Education
Date CapturedThursday July 12, 2007 07:00 PM
This curriculum supports efforts to improve the quality of education data by serving as training materials for K-12 school and district staff. It provides lesson plans, instructional handouts, and related resources, and presents concepts necessary to help schools develop a culture for improving data quality. National Forum on Education Statistics (2007). Forum Curriculum for Improving Education Data: A Resource for Local Education Agencies (NFES 2007-808). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2005
Date CapturedThursday November 30, 2006 08:55 AM
"This [NCES] report presents 11 years of data from 1994 to 2005 (no survey was conducted in 2004) on Internet access in U.S. public schools by school characteristics. It provides trend analysis on the percent of public schools and instructional rooms with Internet access and on the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access. The report contains data on the types of Internet connections, technologies and procedures used to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet, and the availability of hand-held and laptop computers to students and teachers. It also provides information on teacher professional development on how to integrate the use of the Internet into the curriculum, and the use of the Internet to provide opportunities and information for teaching and learning." Wells, J., and Lewis, L. (2006). Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994–2005 (NCES 2007-020). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.

Race to the Top (RttT)

Race to the Top Reform Flow Chart
Date CapturedSaturday September 29, 2012 10:04 AM
State and District Receipt of Recovery Act Funds
Date CapturedFriday September 21, 2012 03:09 PM
A Report From Charting the Progress of Education Reform: An Evaluation of the Recovery Act’s Role; SEPTEMBER 2012: The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA or the Recovery Act) of 2009 provided an unprecedented level of funding designed to “stimulate the economy in the short-term and invest wisely, using these funds to improve schools, raise achievement, drive reforms and produce better results for children and young people for the long-term health of our nation.”1 The distribution of Recovery Act funds was intended to reflect these multiple goals. Nearly $97.4 billion were allocated to the U.S. Department of Education (ED), of which $70.6 billion were awarded by ED for primary and secondary (K-12) education through existing and new federal programs.2 These funds were distributed to states and districts using formulas based primarily on population and student poverty and through competitive grants. In return for grants, Recovery Act recipients were required to commit to four core reforms or assurances: 1. Adopting rigorous college-ready and career-ready standards and high-quality assessments, 2. Establishing data systems and using data to improve performance, 3. Increasing educator effectiveness and the equitable distribution of effective educators, and 4. Turning around the lowest-performing schools.
RACE TO THE TOP: Reform Efforts Are Under Way and Information Sharing Could Be Improved
Date CapturedMonday February 27, 2012 10:49 PM
GAO: RACE TO THE TOP: Reform Efforts Are Under Way and Information Sharing Could Be Improved
New York State Race to the Top Subgrants to Participating LEAs NOV 2010
Date CapturedTuesday February 14, 2012 12:08 AM
Race to the Top Subgrants to Participating LEA's (50% of Total) Based on Receipt of Letters of Intent total $348,323,000 in 2010.
NEW YORK: RACE TO THE TOP ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT
Date CapturedFriday January 20, 2012 02:57 PM
New York faces the ongoing challenge of communicating and collaborating with its various stakeholders. Similarly, the complexity of reviewing and approving Scopes of Work, budgets, expenditures, and evaluation plans for all of the State’s participating LEAs presented a formidable task that required a high level of strategic planning and logistical coordination by NYSED leadership. The State is working to overcome these challenges by investing in communication tools and leveraging other quality-control methods (such as a new online expenditure reporting tool) in order to increase its responsiveness and efficiency in the future.
Race to the Top: Characteristics of Grantees’ Amended Programs and Education’s Review Process
Date CapturedTuesday January 10, 2012 03:13 PM
GAO Findings: • According to Education officials, most amendments consisted of minor adjustments to grant budgets, activities, and timelines, and some amendments involved significant changes to the grant award. Grantees have cited a variety of reasons for these amendments, such as timeline delays and difficulty finding qualified staff. • Education established a review process in which Education officials consider amendment requests on a case-by-case basis. In addition, the department distinguishes significant amendment requests from minor requests based on how the amendment would change project timelines, budgets, performance measures, and the implementation of other related projects. Education reportedly applied greater scrutiny to requests that involved significant changes to grantees’ planned activities, often by requiring that grantees provide additional information or seek consultation from issue- area experts within the department. Rather than reject amendment requests, Education officials explained that they generally asked grantees to resubmit requests with more information.
New York State Race to the Top Application
Date CapturedWednesday March 16, 2011 10:54 AM
New York State submitted its Phase II Race to the Top application to the U.S. Department of Education on June 1. On August 24, the U.S. Department of Education announced that New York State had been awarded $696,646,000 as a winner in the second round of the federal Race to the Top competition. The application and related documents are posted below: Selection Criteria and Competition Priorities (4.05 MB) Appendices (28.88 MB) Participating LEA Memorandum of Understanding and Preliminary Scope of Work (Exhibit I) (63 KB) Frequently Asked Questions and Answers (57 KB) The Regents Education Reform Plan and New York State's Race to the Top (RTTT) Application Summary | PDF (41 KB) Legislation in Support of Race to the Top Application

Remediation

Paying Double: Inadequate High Schools and Community College Remediation
Date CapturedTuesday August 29, 2006 07:22 PM
Alliance for Excellent Education Issue Brief, August, 2006, "The nation would realize an additional $3.7 billion annually in combined reduced expenditures and increased earnings if: • more students who graduate from high school were prepared for college, and thus did not require remediation; and • the students who drop out of college because they were not prepared for college-level reading demands were to continue and earn a Bachelor’s degree at the same rate as nonremedial students."

Resource Links

Guide to Public Policy Degree Online Programs
Date CapturedMonday February 28, 2011 02:44 PM
Comprehensive list of accredited public policy degree programs in the US.

Rural Schools

The Impact of School-District Consolidation on Property Values
Date CapturedThursday August 23, 2007 10:32 AM
A Monthly Column by EFAP Director John Yinger. Yinger writes, "Overall, this evidence implies that consolidation yields net benefits to the average household in a small rural school district, but that consolidation is not popular with high-income households anywhere in rural New York."
Preparing Principals for High-Need Rural Schools: A Central Office Perspective about Collaborative Efforts to Transform School Leadership
Date CapturedSaturday July 22, 2006 08:30 PM
This article presents district administrators’ reflections about (a) the contextual challenges they face in leading a high-need rural school system in Central Appalachia and (b) the change initiatives they implemented to transform the principalship from school management to instructional leadership. The article presents perspectives by the district administrators and leadership educators involved in the district-initiated activities to change the culture of administrative practice. Browne-Ferrigno, T., & Allen, L. W. (2006, February 10). Preparing principal for high-need rural schools: A central office perspective about collaborative efforts to transform school leadership. Journal of Research in Rural Education, 21(1). Retrieved 7/22/2006 from http://www.umaine.edu/jrre/21-1.htm
President's FY 2007 Budget Proposal for the Forest Service - Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act Extension
Date CapturedFriday May 05, 2006 09:16 AM
The President’s fiscal year 2007 budget includes a legislative proposal that would grant the Forest Service authority to sell small tracts of forest land that are isolated or inefficient to manage due to their location or other characteristics. The money received from the sales (up to $800 million) would go towards funding states and counties impacted by the loss of receipts associated with lower timber harvests on federal lands. The legislation would amend the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act for an additional five years.
The incidence and impacts of student transiency in upstate New York’s rural school districts
Date CapturedThursday February 16, 2006 01:58 PM
Schafft, K. A. (2005, December 22). The incidence and impacts of student transiency in upstate New York’s rural school districts. Journal of Research in Rural Education, 20(15). Chronic student mobility, and in particular the mobility of students from low-income backgrounds, poses a serious yet underdocumented problem for rural schools. This article combines analyses of state-level school district data with survey and interview data to examine the patterns of low-income student mobility in upstate New York, and to assess the impacts on, and responses by, schools and other community institutions.
NSBA Rural Schools and Consolidation Policy Paper
Date CapturedFriday November 25, 2005 09:32 PM

Safety

Between Policy and Reality: School Administrators Critical of Department of Education School Safety Policy
Date CapturedThursday February 22, 2007 07:26 AM
A REPORT BY PUBLIC ADVOCATE BETSY GOTBAUM, FEBRUARY 2007. "The Public Advocate makes these recommendation: The Public Advocate made these recommendations: • The DOE must solicit the input of teachers, students, principals, parents, community-based organizations, and other stakeholders in the development of school safety policies that are conducive to teaching and learning. • The DOE, in conjunction with the Office of Management and Budget, should list all school safety budget allocations as line items in the city budget, including items such as Safe Schools Against Violence in Education Act (SAVE) provisions. • The DOE must ensure that all schools have “time-out” or SAVE rooms on-site for disruptive students, as required by state law. • The DOE must substantially enhance the role of conflict education and resolution programming in schools and make training for teachers and administrators mandatory. 'The DOE must provide the resources needed to ensure a safe environment for students and school staff,” Gotbaum said. “School safety must be a top priority. ”

School Choice

Evaluation of D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After One Year
Date CapturedFriday June 22, 2007 08:56 AM
The report studies five key outcomes of the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program: school differences; academic achievement; parental perceptions of school satisfaction and safety; student reports of school satisfaction and safety; and the impact of using a scholarship. The analysis estimates the effects of the program approximately seven months after the start of the students' first school year in the program and finds no statistically significant difference in test scores overall between students who were offered a scholarship and students who were not offered a scholarship. Wolf, Patrick, Babette Gutmann, Michael Puma, Lou Rizzo, Nada Eissa, and Marsha Silverberg. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After One Year. U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2007.
SCHOOL CHOICE BY THE NUMBERS: THE FISCAL EFFECT OF SCHOOL CHOICE PROGRAMS, 1990-2006
Date CapturedMonday May 21, 2007 07:54 AM
Prepared by Susan L. Aud, PhD, SeniorFellow, Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation, "Key findings include: School choice programs have saved a total of about $444 million from 1990 to 2006, including a total of $22 million saved in state budgets and $422 million saved in local public school districts. Every existing school choice program is at least fiscally neutral, and most produce a substantial savings. Only Utah’s Carson Smith voucher program and the two century-old 'town tuitioning' programs in Maine and Vermont are neutral; every other school choice program has produced at least $1 million in savings. In nearly every school choice program, the dollar value of the voucher or scholarship is less than or equal to the state’s formula spending per student. This means states are spending the same amount or less on students in school choice programs than they would have spent on the same students if they had attended public schools, producing a fiscal savings."
Civics Exam: Schools of choice boost civic values
Date CapturedSunday May 20, 2007 09:23 AM
Patrick J. Wolf, professor of education reform and 21st century chair in school choice at the University of Arkansas College of Education and Health Professions writes, "In summary, the empirical studies to date counter the claims of school choice opponents that private schooling inherently and inevitably undermines the fostering of civic values. The statistical record suggests that private schooling and school choice often enhance the realization of the civic values that are central to a well-functioning democracy. This seems to be the case particularly among ethnic minorities (such as Latinos) in places with great ethnic diversity (such as New York City and Texas), and when Catholic schools are the schools of choice. Choice programs targeted to such constituencies seem to hold the greatest promise of enhancing the civic values of the next generation of American citizens."
Charter, Private, Public Schools and Academic Achievement: New Evidence from NAEP Mathematics Data. 2006.
Date CapturedSunday April 08, 2007 06:23 PM
Author: Chris Lubienski and Sarah Theule Lubienski. "Findings reveal that demographic differences between students in public and private schools account for the relatively high raw scores of private schools on the NAEP. Indeed, after controlling for these differences, public school students generally score better than their private school peers. Three other findings warrant mention. First, Lutheran schools are the highest performing private schools. Second, Conservative Christian schools, the fastest growing private school sector, are the lowest performing private schools. Third, fourth graders in charter schools scored below public school students, but eighth graders in charter schools scored above public school students. This suggests that assessments of charter schools must pay careful attention to the sample population that is being examined."
Charter schools come out winners as statewide cap is doubled to 200
Date CapturedThursday April 05, 2007 09:11 AM
Buffalo News reports, "A newly created pool of 'transition aid' will provide Buffalo $12 million next school year to cushion the $60 million the district makes in transfer payments to 15 charter schools. Even so, Buffalo school officials said they would need to recover an additional $28 million to equalize transfer payments with savings the district realizes from the loss of students to charter schools. In addition, the transition aid is scheduled to be phased out over the next three years, said Gary M. Crosby, chief operations and financial officer for the Buffalo schools."
Why We Fight: How Public Schools Cause Social Conflict
Date CapturedThursday March 08, 2007 02:48 PM
Neal McCluskey, policy analyst at the Center for Educational Freedom writes, "This paper reexamines the accepted story about public schooling’s role in creating unity and upholding democracy. First, it documents outbreaks over the past academic year of the most divisive kinds of public school conflicts— those pitting people’s deeply held values against each other—and makes clear that such combat is inevitable when everyone is required to pay for an official school system that only the most politically powerful control. Next, it examines the historical record of American education and finds that conflict and division have long been part of public schooling. Finally, the report identifies the true foundations of the nation’s unity and success, and explains why the only system of education that can effectively support a free society is one that is itself grounded in freedom."
Report Card on American Education: A State by State Analysis: 1983-1984 to 2003-2004
Date CapturedTuesday January 02, 2007 07:33 AM
This American Legislative Exchange Council study ranks the educational performance of the school systems in the states, and the District of Columbia according to several criteria including National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), SAT, and ACT scores. Author Andrew T. LeFevre concludes, "As more and more parents see that they can—and should— have a choice in their child’s education, it causes more and more leaks in the dam that has been holding back real educational reform. And soon, the educational establishment will run out of fi ngers to plug those leaks and then the fl ood of educational reform and school choice will finally be free to flow all across this great nation—bringing liberation to many that have struggled far too long to escape from an educational system that has failed them all too often."
"Alternative" Charter School Authorizers: Playing a Vital Role in the Charter Movement
Date CapturedTuesday December 26, 2006 08:06 AM
This Progressive Policy Institute paper by Louann Bierlein Palmer assesses the quality of alternative charter authorizers including independent state-level charter boards, higher education institutions, municipal offices and nonprofit groups. Palmer determines that the best authorizers share three traits: 1. They desire their jobs as authorizers; 2. They are relatively insulated from politics; and 3. They have the ability to create the adequate infrastructure necessary to achieve high quality outcomes.
Charter High Schools Closing the Achievement Gap
Date CapturedTuesday December 12, 2006 09:01 AM
Prepared by WestEd for the U.S. Department of Education Office of Innovation and Improvement. Study concludes, "Closing the achievement gaps that separate the academic performance of various subgroups of students is a central goal of current education reform efforts nationwide. Hard-earned progress has been made at the elementary school level, but high school students are not progressing nearly as well. Indeed, it is at this level that performance gains in general have been most elusive and chronic student achievement disparities among significant subgroups seem most intransigent. Yet success is not beyond reach. This guide profiles eight charter secondary schools that are making headway in meeting the achievement challenge. They are introduced here so their practices can inspire and inform other school communities striving to ensure that all of their students, regardless of their race, ZIP code, learning differences, or home language, are successful learners capable of meeting high academic standards." U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement, Charter High Schools: Closing the Achievement Gap, Washington, D.C., 2006.
Broken promise: How the charter school experiment is falling short, December 2006.
Date CapturedFriday December 08, 2006 04:09 PM
NYSUT study concludes, "This study of charter school performance shows charter schools have fallen short of the promise and purposes described in the legislation creating charter schools. The experiment is not working and should not be expanded by increasing the cap. Changes in the law should be made to take the financial burden off school districts where charters are located by enacting transition aid; and stronger accountability measures should be put in place to make charter schools more accountable to local communities and the state. Before any increase in the number of charter schools is even considered, a limit must be placed on the percentage of public school students enrolled in charter schools in an individual school district, as well as the percentage of public school budgets diverted to charter schools. This would help ameliorate the damaging effects of over-saturation of experimental charter schools in any one district."
The Charter State Option: Charting a Course Toward Federalism in Education
Date CapturedWednesday December 06, 2006 05:40 PM
Dan Lips, Education Analyst, Evan Feinberg, Research Assistant in Domestic Policy Studies, and Jennifer A. Marshall, Director of Domestic Policy Studies at The Heritage Foundation conclude, "Beginning in 2007, policymakers should steer a course toward restoring state control of education by enacting a charter state option. Congress should allow all states to enter into an alternative contrac­tual arrangement with the federal government in which they would be freed from federal program mandates while taking responsibility for results. Such federalism would create an environment in which promising state and local education strate­gies can flourish."
So Many Schools, So Few Options:How Mayor Bloomberg’s Small High School Reforms Deny Full Access to English Language Learners
Date CapturedWednesday November 29, 2006 07:08 AM
Key findings: ELLs Are Not Given Full and Equitable Access to All Small High Schools, Parents of ELLs and Students Reported Barriers in the High School Admissions and Enrollment Process, The Small School Policy for ELLs Appears to be Forcing ELLs to Remain in Large High Schools that Do Not Have Services to Meet Their Needs , Small Schools are Not Being Created in Queens, in which the Largest Number of ELLs Reside. A joint report by: The New York Immigration Coalition & Advocates for Children of New York In collaboration with: Chhaya Community Development Corporation Chinese Progressive Association Chinese-American Planning Council Council of Peoples Organization Haitian Americans United for Progress Make the Road by Walking Metropolitan Russian American Parents Association November 2006.
Trends in the Use of School Choice: 1993 to 2003
Date CapturedTuesday November 28, 2006 10:27 AM
"This NCES report uses data from the National Household Surveys Program (NHES) to present trends that focus on the use of and users of public schools (assigned and chosen), private schools (church- and non church-related), and homeschoolers between 1993 and 2003. The percentage of students enrolled in their assigned public school decreased from 80 percent to 74 percent between 1993 and 2003, while this decrease was nearly offset by an increase in chosen public school enrollment from 11 to 15 percent between 1993 and 2003. During this same time period, enrollment in church-related private schools remained stable at 8 percent and enrollment in non church-related private schools increased from 1.6 to 2.4 percent. This report also presents data on parental perceptions of public school choice availability and associations between the public and private school types children were enrolled in and parental satisfaction with and involvement in the schools. About one-half of all students have parents who reported that public school choice was available in their community, with one-quarter of students attending assigned public schools having parents who considered enrolling them in a school other than the one they were currently attending, while 17 percent of all students and 27 percent of Black students attended a school other than their parent’s first-choice school. Generally, there were no parental involvement differences detected between students enrolled in assigned and chosen public schools. Parents of students in private schools reported more direct involvement in their children’s schools than parents of students enrolled in other types of schools."
Overview of Public Elementary and Secondary Students, Staff, Schools, School Districts, Revenues, and Expenditures: School Year 2004-05 and Fiscal Year 2004
Date CapturedTuesday November 21, 2006 02:21 PM
This NCES report contains information from the 5 Common Core of Data (CCD) surveys: the 2004-05 state, local education agency, and school nonfiscal surveys for 2004-05 and the state and local education agency school finance surveys for fiscal year 2004. The report presents data about the students enrolled in public education, including the number of students by grade and the number receiving special education, migrant, or English language learner services. Some tables disaggregate the student data by racial/ethnic group or community characteristics such as rural - urban. The numbers and types of teachers, other education staff, schools, and local education agencies are also reported. Finance data include revenues by source (local, state, and federal) and total and per-pupil expenditures by function. Sable, J., and Hill, J. (2006). Overview of Public Elementary and Secondary Students, Staff, Schools, School Districts, Revenues, and Expenditures: School Year 2004–05 and Fiscal Year 2004 (NCES 2007-309). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Maintenance Required: Charter Schooling in Michigan
Date CapturedTuesday October 24, 2006 12:22 PM
By Sara Mead. Education Sector Reports: Charter School Series. "This report examines both the achievements and shortfalls of Michigan's experiment in charter schooling. It reviews Michigan's charter school legislation and the evolution of charter schools in the state. It describes the state's charter school sector today and evaluates the performance of the state's 230 schools. It explores the problems of quality and other challenges facing Michigan's charter schools, and it offers recommendations for improvement." Education Sector, 1201 Connecticut Ave., NW, Suite 850, Washington, DC 20036.
Charter Schools against the Odds: An Assessment of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education
Date CapturedMonday October 23, 2006 04:44 PM
By Paul Hill, research professor in the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs and director of the Center on Reinventing Public Education, both at the University of Washington.Contrib tors: John E. Chubb, Chester E. Finn Jr., Paul T. Hill, Caroline M. Hoxby, Eric Osberg, Paul E. Peterson, Brad Smith, Nat Torinus The Hoover Institution writes, "The expert contributors to this volume tell how state laws and policies have stacked the deck against charter schools by limiting the number of charter schools allowed in a state, forbidding for-profit firms from holding charters, forcing them to pay rent out of operating funds, and other ways. They explain how these policies can be amended to level the playing field and give charter schools—and the children they serve—a fairer chance to succeed." Full-text PDF versions of each chapter can be accessed by clicking on the desired chapter title.
Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003-04
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 12:53 AM
NCES: The data include such characteristics as the numbers of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Several findings were: These 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers, in 2003-04. The 100 largest districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2002-03. Across these districts, the averaged freshman graduation rate was 68.8 percent. In 19 of the 100 largest districts the rate was 80 percent or higher. The rate was less than 50 percent in 8 of the 100 largest districts. Three states – California, Florida, and Texas – accounted for 41 of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $4,413 in Alpine School District, Utah to a high of $17,652 in Newark City, New Jersey. Dalton, B., Sable, J., and Hoffman, L. (2006). Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003–04 (NCES 2006-329). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Giving Kids the Chaff: How to Find and Keep the Teachers We Need
Date CapturedMonday September 25, 2006 09:08 AM
Marie Gryphon, director of educational programs at the Institute for Humane Studies and an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute concludes, "Teacher quality can be improved dramatically when hiring managers understand the attributes that make for good teachers and are given the right incentives to make good hiring decisions. Many of the current public policy proposals to improve educational quality in American public schools, such as merit pay and hiring bonuses for teachers with subjectspecific expertise, attempt to create the same economic stimuli that are naturally present in competitive markets. Allowing families to choose their schools, and giving schools the freedom and market incentives to make wise personnel decisions, will reward good schools and good teachers, providing more students with the high-quality education they deserve."
School Choice: 2006 Progress Report
Date CapturedMonday September 18, 2006 05:46 PM
Dan Lips, Education Analyst and Evan Feinberg, Research Assistant in the Domestic Policy Studies Department at The Heritage Foundation write, "One likely reason for the growing bipartisan sup­port for school choice is the mounting empirical evidence that school choice programs work. Over the past 15 years, the growth of school choice pro­grams has enabled researchers to study the impact of school choice on students, families, and school systems. Students participating in school choice programs have made academic gains when com­pared to their peers in public school. Importantly, public schools that face competition from choice programs have shown improvement."
Are Public or Private Schools Doing Better? How the NCES Study Is Being Misinterpreted
Date CapturedFriday September 01, 2006 02:27 PM
Shanea Watkins, Policy Analyst in Empirical Studies in the Center for Data Analysis at The Heritage Foundation writes, "The NAEP data are certainly not suitable for establishing whether a specific math or reading achievement outcome is associated with attending either a private or public school. Despite this fact, the results of the NCES study are being interpreted inappropriately to imply that voucher programs, which include private schools, are a bad idea. The research literature that addresses the effec­tiveness of school voucher programs in raising math and reading achievement, based on more sophisticated methodology, is much more convinc­ing and conclusive. Students who attend a private school through a voucher program experience greater gains in math and reading than do their public school counterparts."
A Summary of the Current Research on California's Effectiveness at Improving Student Achievement
Date CapturedTuesday August 22, 2006 07:07 PM
Key Findings: "The available research, presented chronologically below, shows that by introducing high-quality and innovative approaches into public education, California’s charter public schools are having a positive impact on the state’s public school system."
The 38th Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools
Date CapturedTuesday August 22, 2006 10:47 AM
(September 2006) By LOWELL C. ROSE executive director emeritus of Phi Delta Kappa International and ALEC M. GALLUP, co-chairman, with George Gallup, Jr., of the Gallup Organization, Princeton, N.J. "In probing the public’s opinions of NCLB, the PDK/Gallup poll finds that there is widespread support for the law’s goals -- closing the achievement gap between African American and Latino students and their white peers and improving educational outcomes for all students -- but broad disagreement with its specific strategies. When asked whether testing students in only English and math, as currently required by NCLB, can give a fair picture of a school, 81% of the public say no. And 78% are worried that the law’s focus on these two subjects will mean less emphasis on other subjects. The poll finds that two-thirds of those surveyed oppose measuring school success by the percentage of students passing a single statewide test, while 81% prefer measuring the improvement that students make during the year."
A Closer Look at Charter Schools Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Date CapturedTuesday August 22, 2006 10:34 AM
NCES, "The school sample comprised 150 charter schools and 6,764 traditional public schools. The report uses hierarchical linear models (HLMs) to examine differences between the two types of schools when multiple student and/or school characteristics are taken into account. After adjusting for student demographic characteristics, charter school mean scores in reading and mathematics were lower, on average, than those for traditional public schools. The size of these differences was smaller in reading than in mathematics. Results from the second analysis showed that in reading and mathematics, average performance differences between traditional public schools and charter schools affiliated with a public school district were not statistically significant, while charter schools not affiliated with a public school district scored significantly lower on average than traditional public schools." Braun, H., Jenkins, F., and Grigg, W. (2006). A Closer Look at Charter Schools Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (NCES 2006-460). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
The Determinants of Student Achievement in Ohio’s Public Schools
Date CapturedFriday August 04, 2006 01:08 AM
By Matthew Carr, Education Policy Director, Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions. Carr writes, "To capture the changing dynamics of both different academic subjects and students at different ages, this analysis evaluates student performance in five subjects (math, reading, writing, science and citizenship) across grades 3 to 12. This combination gives us 21 separate analyses, or mathematical models. Controls were also included for geography, student socio-economic status, race, and learning disability. This study breaks new ground by also analyzing the factors that influence student performance in charter schools."
On the Public-Private School Achievement Debate
Date CapturedWednesday August 02, 2006 06:28 PM
Paul E. Peterson and Elena Llaudet discuss methodological problems with NCES's study requested by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), "The results from the Alternative Models should not be understood as showing that private schools outperform public schools. Without information on prior student achievement, one cannot answer questions about schools’ efficacy in raising student test scores. The NCES analysis is at serious risk of having produced biased estimates, because its adjustment for student characteristics suffered from two sorts of problems: a) inconsistent classification of student characteristics across sectors and b) inclusion of student characteristics open to school influence. To avoid bias, classification decisions must be consistent for both groups under study. This rule was violated repeatedly in the NCES study." PEPG 06-02. Program on Education Policy and Governance Department of Government, FAS Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
New York State Charter Schools Act of 1998, Article 56.
Date CapturedSaturday July 22, 2006 07:53 PM
Article 56 Section 2850. Short title; purpose. 2851. Eligible applicants; applications; submission. 2852. Issuance of charter. 2853. Charter school organization; oversight; facilities. 2854. General requirements. 2855. Causes for revocation or termination. 2856. Financing of charter schools. 2857. Notice; review and assessment.
2004-05 Annual Report on the Status of Charter Schools in New York State
Date CapturedFriday July 21, 2006 10:49 AM
"This report provides data required by §2857(3) of the Education Law and covers the 2004-05 school year, during which a total of 61 charter schools were open for instruction. Of these 61 schools, 16 were chartered by the Board of Regents, 32 were chartered by the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York ('SUNY'), 11 were chartered by the Chancellor of the New York City Public Schools, and two were chartered by the Board of Education of the Buffalo City School District. Twenty-one had management companies as partners."
Comparing Private Schools and Public Schools Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Date CapturedFriday July 14, 2006 06:41 PM
This NCES study compares mean 2003 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading and mathematics scores of public and private schools in 4th and 8th grades, statistically controlling for individual student characteristics (such as gender, race/ethnicity, disability status, identification as an English language learner) and school characteristics (such as school size, location, and the composition of the student body).
Politics of Charter Schools: Competing National Advocacy Coalitions Meet Local Politics
Date CapturedSaturday July 01, 2006 07:48 PM
2006. Author: Michael W. Kirst. This paper identifies supporters and opponents of charter schools at all levels of government and describes their motivations and behaviors. The author explains that state and local support for charter schools is most often determined by educational needs and material incentives. Different political contexts produce different charter school policies. For example, charter school legislation in Michigan was designed to increase competition among public schools. Legislation in Georgia served to deregulate public education after a period of increased state centralization. The paper concludes that there is no cohesive state or local charter political pattern, given the variations in charter schools and their contexts.
Florida Charter Schools: Hot and Humid with Passing Storms
Date CapturedTuesday May 30, 2006 05:32 PM
by Bryan C. Hassel, Michelle Godard Terrell, and Julie Kowal, Public Impact
Profiles of For-Profit Education Management
Date CapturedThursday May 25, 2006 09:34 AM
Eighth Annual Report 2005-2006 by Alex Molnar, David R. Garcia, Margaret Bartlett, Adrienne O’Neill. Released by the Education Policy Studies Laboratory at Arizona State University, this report, in its eighth edition, found that Education Management Organizations (EMOs) are consolidating and shifting business models to meet the demand for supplemental education services. Large EMOs continue to focus on managing charter primary schools and enrolling relatively large numbers of students in those schools. Fifty-one EMOs operate in 28 states and the District of Columbia, enrolling some 237,179 students. The report is the most comprehensive resource on the for-profit education management industry.
The Choice is Ours: Expanding Educational Opportunity for all Twin Cities Children
Date CapturedWednesday May 24, 2006 08:40 AM
A new report by the Institute on Race & Poverty (IRP) at the University of Minnesota reveals the disturbing extent of school segregation in the Twin Cities region. The authors of the report envision a brighter future if an already successful school choice program is expanded. The report, “The Choice Is Ours: Expanding Educational Opportunity for all Twin Cities Children,” describes how economic and racial segregation harms children and the region.
Charter, Private, Public Schools and Academic Achievement: New Evidence from NAEP Mathematics Data
Date CapturedMonday January 23, 2006 08:18 PM
2006. Author: Chris Lubienski and Sarah Theule Lubienski. National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.
Peaks & Valleys
Date CapturedWednesday December 28, 2005 01:52 AM
PPI | Policy Report | December 20, 2005 Peaks & Valleys Colorado's Charter School Landscape By Todd Ziebarth
School Vouchers: The Research Track Record, Student Acheivement
Date CapturedMonday December 05, 2005 07:59 AM
This research brief summarizes the most recent evidence on the impact of private school vouchers on student achievement, particularly among low-income youngsters.

School Funding

The Confidence Men
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 10:09 AM
By Eric Hanushek . Hanushek writes, "Clients want a bottom-line statement about how much spending would provide an adequate education, and they want this cost estimate attached to their specific state. Few people care about the 'studies' on which consultants base their reports, or even their validity, because nobody really expects schools to implement these specific programs if given extra funding. Clients simply want a requisite amount of scientific aura around the number that will become the rallying flag for political and legal actions. Summing the added cost of the separate programs suggested by Picus and Odden, I estimate that the overall plan, if fully applied, would increase average spending in Washington by $1,760 to $2,760 per student, or 23 to 35 percent. This estimate of the increased spending necessary to achieve “adequacy” is very similar to the percentage increases they have recommended to other states, and numbers like these will presumably become part of the headlines surrounding the new court case. But pity the poor states that actually implement the Picus and Odden plan. They are sure to be disappointed by the results, and most taxpayers (those who do not work for the schools) will be noticeably poorer."
Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts: School Year 2004–05
Date CapturedWednesday July 25, 2007 09:25 AM
This NCES brief publication contains data on revenues and expenditures per pupil made by school districts for school year 2004-05. Median per pupil revenue and expenditure data are reported by state, as well as values at the 5th and 95th percentiles. Data for charter schools are reported separately. There are also discussions on the different types of school districts, and other resources that may be helpful in analyzing school district level data. Revenues and expenditures for the 100 largest school districts are included, as well as federal revenues by program. Zhou, L., and Gaviola, N. (2007). Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts: School Year 2004–05 (Fiscal Year 2005) (NCES 2007-355). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved July 25, 2007 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=200735
Getting Down to Facts: A Research Project Examining California’s School Governance and Finance
Date CapturedMonday July 23, 2007 09:03 AM
The researchers aimed to make the best possible use of existing research findings, identifying important holes in existing research and determining whether there were empirical studies that could be performed in the given timeframe to fill some of these holes. The new empirical work stems from this approach. As a result, the studies each provide a strong review of the literature with targeted new empirical additions.
Money, Not Race, Fuels New Push to Buoy Schools
Date CapturedSaturday June 30, 2007 11:13 AM
NY Times TAMAR LEWIN and DAVID M. HERSZENHORN report, "For several years, two lawyers intent on helping black children do as well in school as white children had a kind of roadshow: Michael A. Rebell would describe the recent successes of state-court litigation, forcing more financing for poor children’s schools, as a matter of basic equity. But James Ryan would argue that integration was the best approach. "
New York Suburban School Districts Among Top Spenders
Date CapturedSunday June 10, 2007 10:43 AM
NY Times reports, "New York’s high teacher costs are partly attributable to smaller class sizes: The state’s suburban districts, for instance, employ far more teachers than the rest of the country — 76 per 1,000 students, compared with the national average of 60 — but only slightly more than the New Jersey suburbs, at 74, and Fairfield, at 70. New York’s suburban districts, though, pay more for each teacher, even compared with New Jersey and Connecticut — about $133,000 in salary and benefits for each full-time teacher, compared with $94,000 in northern New Jersey and $100,000 in Fairfield, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Mr. Ernst said teacher salaries reflect higher costs in the state, and a more favorable legal and political atmosphere for labor in New York that makes it difficult to get concessions in years when money is tight. But Richard C. Iannuzzi, president of the New York State United Teachers, said teacher salaries were simply a further demonstration of the state’s commitment to education."
Where's my school tax rebate?
Date CapturedFriday May 25, 2007 09:20 AM
Times Herald-Record reports, "The confusion stems from the Legislature's insistence on doling out the relief as post-school-tax rebates. That's instead of taking it off the top of school tax bills, like Gov. Eliot Spitzer wanted. It's a complex proposition because Spitzer preferred to distribute the relief based on income levels. So, unlike the rebates that were automatically mailed out last year, the state's 3.3 million homeowners will have to apply for their checks."
HS doesn't like money? I'll check it out - Randi
Date CapturedThursday May 10, 2007 08:57 AM
NY Daily News reports, "Though the school's students come from poor families, most are academically successful and therefore unable to benefit from Title I unless parents and teachers vote for a 'schoolwide option' to free up the cash. Parents voted unanimously to do so, but most teachers are opposed. The school could lose as much $70,000 again next year."
Study: Local taxes up despite historic state school aid
Date CapturedThursday May 03, 2007 10:11 PM
AP MICHAEL GORMLEY reports, "The state Business Council's annual School Tax Watch reported Thursday that despite the state aid increase of $1.8 billion approved April 1, the per pupil property tax levy will increase 4 percent on average statewide. That would be down from a 6 percent increase a year ago, according to the business group. State aid is now about $19 billion a year. Between state and local sources, per-pupil spending will increase 6 percent to $18,035, on average, according to the Business Council. That's about twice the inflation rate."
Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2004-05 (Fiscal Year 2005)
Date CapturedThursday April 19, 2007 09:45 AM
This brief publication contains basic revenue and expenditure data, by state, for public elementary and secondary education for school year 2004-05. It contains state-level data on revenues by source and expenditures by function, including expenditures per pupil. Zhou, L., Honegger, S., and Gaviola, N. (2007). Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2004–05 (Fiscal Year 2005) (NCES 2007-356). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved April 19, 2007 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2007356.
Charter schools come out winners as statewide cap is doubled to 200
Date CapturedThursday April 05, 2007 09:11 AM
Buffalo News reports, "A newly created pool of 'transition aid' will provide Buffalo $12 million next school year to cushion the $60 million the district makes in transfer payments to 15 charter schools. Even so, Buffalo school officials said they would need to recover an additional $28 million to equalize transfer payments with savings the district realizes from the loss of students to charter schools. In addition, the transition aid is scheduled to be phased out over the next three years, said Gary M. Crosby, chief operations and financial officer for the Buffalo schools."
On LI, new numbers bring a sigh of relief
Date CapturedThursday March 29, 2007 08:57 AM
Newsday reports, "More than $500 million in extra education aid could ameliorate the blow Long Island school districts had feared under Spitzer's new funding formula, which funnels more money to high-needs districts. The Island's Republican senators succeeded in doubling the amount of school aid the governor had earmarked for the region, adding up to $115 million, said state Sen. John J. Flanagan of East Northport. Others from the delegation predicted that the region's share of school operating aid would be restored to its traditional 13 percent, although state money for school building projects had not been negotiated."
Inside Public Education 2007
Date CapturedFriday March 09, 2007 10:56 AM
Inside Public Education reports the results of a survey conducted by the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion and funded by the Dyson Foundation. Residents of Dutchess and Ulster Counties in New York were interviewed about the public schools in their communities. They shared their opinions, experiences, and insights about what they consider to be the best and the worst of public education in the school district where they live.
EdTrust Releases Funding Gaps 2006: How the Federal Government Makes Rich
Date CapturedMonday February 26, 2007 09:34 AM
"University of Washington Research Assistant Professor Marguerite Roza shows that, despite district bookkeeping practices that make funding across schools within the same district appear relatively comparable, substantially less money is spent in high-poverty and high-minority schools. Teacher salaries are the clearest example. Roza looks at salary expenditures in a variety of districts and finds troubling inequities in the allocation of this key resource among schools in the same district. For example in Austin, a city with one of the largest salary gaps, the gap in average teacher salaries between the highest and lowest poverty schools within the district amounted to $3,837. In a school of 25 teachers that gap amounts to $95,925 less per year for a low-income school; in a school with 100 teachers, the gap increases to $383,700 per year."
Frozen Assets: Rethinking Teacher Contracts Could Free Billions for School Reform
Date CapturedTuesday January 09, 2007 06:57 AM
Education Sector report written by Marguerite Rosa . Many common provisions of teacher contracts require school districts to spend substantial sums to implement policies which research has shown have a weak or inconsistent relationship with student learning. This report examines eight such provisions: Increases in teacher salaries based on years of experience; Increases in teacher salaries based on educational credentials and experiences; Professional development days; Number of paid sick and personal days; Class-size limitations; Use of teachers’ aides; Generous health and insurance benefits; and Generous retirement benefits.
Report on the Cost of Education
Date CapturedMonday December 18, 2006 10:05 AM
The primary purpose of this report is to calculate the costs New Jersey school districts face in meeting state performance and accountability standards. Costs addressed include: 1. A per-student “base” cost (which reflects only the cost of serving students with no special needs); and 2. Adjustments to the base cost that reflect the added cost of serving special need students (including special education students, at-risk students and English language learners). To identify these costs, the report used two nationally recognized study approaches. The Department weighed the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and then selected one – the Professional Judgment Panel (PJP) approach – whose results form the basis of the report’s findings.
The No Child Left Behind Act: Have Federal Funds Been Left Behind?
Date CapturedMonday November 20, 2006 01:57 PM
"The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) imposes new requirements on state education systems and provides additional education funding. This paper estimates education cost functions, predicts the spending required to support NCLB standards, and compares this spending with the funding available through NCLB. This analysis is conducted for Kansas and Missouri, which have similar education environments but very different standards. We find that new federal funding is sufficient to support very low standards for student performance, but cannot come close to funding high standards without implausibly large increases in schooldistrict efficiency. Because of the limited federal funding and the severe penalties in NCLB when a school does not meet its state’s standards, states have a strong incentive to keep their standards low. NCLB needs to be reformed so that it will encourage high standards." *The authors are Professor of Public Administration, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University; Associate Professor of Public Administration, University of Nevada at Los Vegas; and Professor of Public Administration and Economics, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University, respectively. We are grateful to David Sjoquist for helpful comments. 1 1. Introduction The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) both imposes mandates on states and gives them more federal education funding. The authors are William Duncombe, Anna Lukemeyer and John Yinger, Professor of Public Administration, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University; Associate Professor of Public Administration, University of Nevada at Los Vegas; and Professor of Public Administration and Economics, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University, respectively.
The Invisible Face of CFE: New York’s Small City School Districts in Crisis
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 07:47 AM
Prepared by Robert Biggerstaff, New York State Association of Small City School Districts' and written by Charles A. Winters, former Newburgh administrator, study concludes students in small New York state urban settings suffer as much or more than children in New York City from chronic underfunding. Small-city districts have comparable poverty levels, draw from a less wealthy tax base and students fail just as much, if not more, than New York City children.
Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003-04
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 12:53 AM
NCES: The data include such characteristics as the numbers of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Several findings were: These 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers, in 2003-04. The 100 largest districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2002-03. Across these districts, the averaged freshman graduation rate was 68.8 percent. In 19 of the 100 largest districts the rate was 80 percent or higher. The rate was less than 50 percent in 8 of the 100 largest districts. Three states – California, Florida, and Texas – accounted for 41 of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $4,413 in Alpine School District, Utah to a high of $17,652 in Newark City, New Jersey. Dalton, B., Sable, J., and Hoffman, L. (2006). Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003–04 (NCES 2006-329). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Education Policy Should Not Be Based on Programs that Cannot be Replicated
Date CapturedThursday September 14, 2006 12:06 PM
Education Finance and Accountability Program at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University (EFAP) Director John Yinger writes, "The use of additional funds does not, of course, guarantee success. Many schools undoubtedly use policies and practices that cost more than equally effective alternatives. But one cannot identify these alternatives simply by looking at a few successful schools. Instead, we need to continue evaluating a wide range of programs to determine which ones can raise student performance under what circumstances and at what cost."
Assemblyman Kevin Cahill on tax reform legislation (video)
Date CapturedSunday August 13, 2006 08:03 PM
Tax Reform Effort of Northern Dutchess (TREND) director Vicky Perry interviewed Assemblyman Kevin Cahill on his proposal to reform New York State taxes and school funding.
NYSSBA's Opinion - Taylor Law
Date CapturedThursday August 03, 2006 11:08 AM
By Timothy G. Kremer, Executive Director, New York State School Boards Association. Kremer writes on property taxes and the Taylor Law, "The problem is that the Taylor Law contains only a vague definition of bad-faith bargaining. PERB under the current chairman has been even-handed in its rulings, but past PERBS have been friendlier to the unions. The Abbate-Robach bills don’t punish the school board or mayor, but the property taxpayer. And it’s not as if public employees are still underpaid as they once were. A typical teacher earns an average of $53,000 in New York State. Public employees’ health insurance plans and retirement benefits are among the best. That they are somehow being taken advantage of at the bargaining table by cold-hearted local and state governments is pure fiction."
Current Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2003-04
Date CapturedTuesday August 01, 2006 11:47 AM
This NCES brief publication contains data on current expenditures, by state, for public elementary and secondary education for school year 2003-04. It also contains data by state, on median current expenditure per student by school districts, and current expenditures per student by districts at the 5th and 95th percentile. State average current expenditures per student are also included in this report. Johnson, Frank (2006). Current Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2003-04 (NCES 2006-352). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved August 1, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006352.
New York State Assembly School Funding Bill Summary - A08590
Date CapturedSunday July 30, 2006 10:27 AM
Establishes the school property tax elimination act; provides a method whereby school districts may opt into an alternative method of school financing as provided in the article whereby funds are raised through a school income tax in addition to a property tax on "non-primary residence" property.
A Policy Maker’s Guide to “The 65% Solution”
Date CapturedMonday July 24, 2006 08:46 PM
by Gerald W. Bracey, Independent Researcher. "The 65% Proposal would make changes where schools spend their money, but it provides no new money—on purpose. It claims that bringing more of existing money 'into the classroom' would improve performance and reduce waste. Empirical data available does not support this contention. Its one-size-fits 'all “solution' is at odds with the diverse strategies that schools have used to increase achievement. Its reallocation formula assumes that current funding for schools is adequate, an assumption contradicted by numerous recent 'adequacy' suits concluding that states’ funding formulas were unconstitutional because they slighted some districts."
School districts nationwide gag on 65 percent solution
Date CapturedMonday July 24, 2006 08:06 PM
Edwin C. Dardens writes in New York State School Board Association publication, "Almost uniformly, school leaders across the U.S. say the 65 percent solution is a superficial fix that amounts to an accounting placebo. It looks like 'the real thing' and fools those who might not know better, but ultimately does nothing by itself to improve school performance." Forecast, On Board Online • Volume 7 • No. 11 • June 12, 2006.
Public School Finance Programs of the United States and Canada: 1998–99 (NEW YORK STATE)
Date CapturedSaturday July 22, 2006 10:14 PM
NEW YORK: Funding for public education in New York comes from three sources: approximately 4% from federal sources, 40% from state formula aids and grants, and 56% from local revenues. The descriptive information in this publication is designed to be useful to the education finance research community and fiscal policy analysts whose backgrounds and training are very diverse. Brian O. Brent, Warner Graduate School, University of Rochester. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Public School Finance Programs of the United States and Canada: 1998–99. NCES 2001–309; Compilers Catherine C. Sielke, John Dayton, C. Thomas Holmes, of The University of Georgia and Anne L. Jefferson of the University of Ottawa. William J. Fowler, Jr., Project Officer. Washington, DC: 2001.
Support mounts for new school funding model
Date CapturedThursday July 20, 2006 11:20 AM
Thomas B. Fordham Institute reports, "Weighted student funding, a bold new model for public-school finance, is winning remarkable support from a broad spectrum of policymakers, education organizations, parents and school leaders."
Rejecting the 65-Percent Solution
Date CapturedThursday July 06, 2006 10:34 AM
A Monthly Column by EFAP Director John Yinger, July 2006. Yinger writes, "The real problem is that children in high-poverty schools cannot receive an adequate education unless their district spends far more than other districts on many items, such as counseling, health, nutrition, safety, and parental involvement."
Protecting Public Education from Tax Giveaways to Corporations
Date CapturedThursday June 29, 2006 10:23 AM
A study commissioned by the National Education Association (NEA) reveals that local policymakers nationwide are doling out tax breaks and other subsidies to corporations with little or no accountability. Moreover, these tax handouts often come at the direct expense of public schools, with school boards lacking any input in the decision.
Fund the Child, Tackling Inequity & Antiquity in School Finance
Date CapturedTuesday June 27, 2006 10:18 AM
New school funding proposal by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute offers a comprehensive solution to the most pressing problems in American education, including funding disparities on many levels.
A Comparable Wage Approach to Geographic Cost Adjustment
Date CapturedThursday June 15, 2006 04:39 PM
Geographic cost differences present many complications when researchers attempt to make systematic comparisons of educational resources, and failure to address such differences can undermine the equity and adequacy goals of school finance formulas.
The Issues and Implications of the “65 Percent Solution”
Date CapturedThursday May 25, 2006 09:15 AM
As states consider a proposal to require school districts to spend at least 65 cents of every dollar on classroom instruction, an analysis by Standard & Poor's has found a lack of empirical evidence linking higher student achievement with higher proportional spending levels. The report suggests that the specific ways that schools use their instructional dollars may have as much, if not more, to do with student achievement as the percentage of dollars spent on the classroom.
Education Finance Reform and Property Tax Relief
Date CapturedTuesday May 23, 2006 02:19 PM
New York State's Dual Crises: Low Graduation Rates and Rising School Taxes
Date CapturedFriday May 19, 2006 09:10 AM
Inadequate state aid to public schools is jeapordizing the future of New York State's two million public school children and driving up local property taxes, according to a new report released today by AQE and the Public Policy and Education Fund.
The Funding Gap 2005: Low-Income and Minority Students Shortchanged by Most States
Date CapturedThursday December 22, 2005 09:08 AM
Education Trust's Funding Gap report shows that most states significantly shortchange low-income and minority children when it comes to funding the schools they attend.
NCES: Revenues and Expenditures by Public School Districts: School Year 2002-03
Date CapturedMonday December 19, 2005 05:32 PM
This publication contains data on revenues and expenditures per pupil made by school districts for school year 2002-03.
The Alchemy of 'Costing Out' an Adequate Education
Date CapturedSunday December 04, 2005 12:18 PM
October 2005. Published in: Conference on Adequacy Lawsuits, Harvard University. Author: Eric A. Hanushek. In response to the rapid rise in court cases related to the adequacy of school funding, a variety of alternative methods have been developed to provide an analytical base about the necessary expenditure on schools. This paper reviews and critiques the methodology as broadly applied across states.
"From Districts To Schools: The Distribution Of Resources Across Schools In Big City School District
Date CapturedSaturday December 03, 2005 06:17 PM
Symposium on Education Finance and Organization Structure in NYS Schools, Albany, NY, March 2004. Amy Schwartz (NYU), Leanna Stiefel (NYU) and Ross Rubenstein (Syracuse University).

School Reform

The Education Gadfly
Date CapturedFriday July 13, 2007 11:06 AM
A Weekly Bulletin of News and Analysis from the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation -- July 12, 2007, Volume 7, Number 26 . Gotham City showdown: Ravitch and Cantor on NYC reading scores. Diane Ravitch's June 7 Gadfly article took the New York City Department of Education to task for hyping the most recent reading scores for students in grades 3-8. "The scores," she wrote, "were mainly flat or declining." And the much-ballyhooed rise in eighth-grade reading "downplayed the curious fact that eighth grade scores were up across the state." Her interpretation drew a critical review from David Cantor, the NYC Department of Education's Press Secretary. His critique and Ravitch's response follow.
It all adds up to success
Date CapturedWednesday June 13, 2007 10:15 AM
NY Daily News opines, "Next year, Bloomberg and Klein are giving teachers the ability to closely track how well students are learning, so those who lag can get immediate special attention. And the mayor and chancellor are giving parents report cards that will grade how individual schools are working. The trends are moving in the right direction after years of stagnation, and the innate abilities of thousands of kids are finally being unlocked."
Cash is cool: Mike
Date CapturedSaturday June 09, 2007 08:12 AM
NY Daily News reports, "Mayor Bloomberg defended a controversial proposal to pay kids for high test scores yesterday, but said there are no specific plans to make it happen."
Demilitarizing What the Pentagon Knows About Developing Young People: A New Paradigm for Educating Students Who Are Struggling in School and in Life
Date CapturedFriday June 01, 2007 12:53 PM
CCF Working Paper, May 2007, Hugh B. Price, Senior Fellow, Economic Studies. "Millions of adolescents are marginalized academically and destined for oblivion in the twenty-first century economy. They barely, if at all, will be able to uphold their obligations as citizens and providers. The U.S. military figured out how to nurture and unleash the potential of young people like these generations ago. By demilitarizing and deploying what the Pentagon knows about educating and developing aimless young people, these troubled and troublesome young Americans can be transformed into a valued social and economic asset to our nation."
Give schools more time to comply with Contract for Excellence
Date CapturedMonday May 14, 2007 08:56 AM
Legislative Gazette reports, "Educators and lawmakers alike praised Gov. Eliot Spitzer for his landmark investment in public schools, but a Senate bill passed unanimously last week would allow certain schools more time to comply with new accountability measures the increased funding is tied to."
Mr. Rivera Goes to Albany
Date CapturedSaturday April 21, 2007 10:58 PM
City Journal, Spring 2007; Peter Meyer, a Contributing Editor of Education Next writes, "Rivera says that he will push the governor’s initiatives, which he helped create as a member of Spitzer’s education-policy transition team; they include detailed accountability standards and the Contract for Excellence, which obligates educators to spend money on 'what works.'"
Eight for 2008: Education Ideas for the Next President
Date CapturedTuesday April 17, 2007 06:51 PM
Education Sector is offering the following eight education ideas for the 2008 presidential campaign -- Unlock the Pre-K Door , Offer Teachers a New Deal , Create a National Corps of 'SuperPrincipals', Open New Schools in Low-Income Neighborhoods, Launch Learning into the 21st Century, Reward Hard-Working Immigrant Students, Give Students a Roadmap to Good Colleges, Help Students Help Others.
Key State Education Policies on PK-12 Education: 2006
Date CapturedTuesday March 20, 2007 12:20 PM
This CCSSO report informs policymakers and educators about the current status of key education policies across the 50 states that define and shape elementary and secondary education in public schools. The report is part of a continuing biennial series by the Council’s state education indicators program. CCSSO reports 50-state information on policies regarding teacher preparation and certification, high school graduation requirements, student assessment programs, school time, and student attendance. The report also includes state-by-state information on content standards and curriculum, teacher assessment, and school leader/administrator licensure.
Bridging Differences
Date CapturedThursday March 01, 2007 08:23 AM
Deborah Meier and Diane Ravitch have found themselves at odds on policy over the years, but they share a passion for improving schools. Bridging Differences will offer their insights on what matters most in education.
Lesson Plan for Education Reform
Date CapturedThursday December 14, 2006 12:49 PM
Business Week reports, "If implemented, the commission's recommendations—signed by 26 members from all corners of the corporate, nonprofit, education, and political worlds—would revolutionize the way children are educated in this country. Among the ideas: a set of Board Examinations allowing all 10th graders to place into college; improved compensation and incentives to attract better quality teachers; an overhaul of the American testing industry; contract-run schools instead of schools run by school boards; improved education for all three- and four-year-olds; standards for state-run funding instead of local funding; legislation for continued education for adults; a new GI Bill; and regionally focused job training."
Charter High Schools Closing the Achievement Gap
Date CapturedTuesday December 12, 2006 09:01 AM
Prepared by WestEd for the U.S. Department of Education Office of Innovation and Improvement. Study concludes, "Closing the achievement gaps that separate the academic performance of various subgroups of students is a central goal of current education reform efforts nationwide. Hard-earned progress has been made at the elementary school level, but high school students are not progressing nearly as well. Indeed, it is at this level that performance gains in general have been most elusive and chronic student achievement disparities among significant subgroups seem most intransigent. Yet success is not beyond reach. This guide profiles eight charter secondary schools that are making headway in meeting the achievement challenge. They are introduced here so their practices can inspire and inform other school communities striving to ensure that all of their students, regardless of their race, ZIP code, learning differences, or home language, are successful learners capable of meeting high academic standards." U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement, Charter High Schools: Closing the Achievement Gap, Washington, D.C., 2006.
Hands off our school!
Date CapturedThursday November 16, 2006 04:55 AM
NY Daily News reports on plans to tear down an upper East Side [New York City], "Supporters say the building, once known as Julia Rikers for its dangerous reputation, has reinvented itself as a home for six notable schools, including a performing arts high school, a school for autistic children and a school created to serve children of people who work in the area. Their objections were highlighted yesterday by Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez.."
The Fordham Report 2006: How Well Are States Educating Our Neediest Children?
Date CapturedTuesday October 24, 2006 07:51 AM
The Thomas B. Fordham writes, "The Fordham Report 2006: How Well Are States Educating Our Neediest Children? appraises each state according to thirty indicators across three major categories: student achievement for low-income, African-American, and Hispanic students; achievement trends for these same groups over the last 10-15 years; and the state's track record in implementing bold education reforms. In this, the inaugural edition, just six states can claim even moderate success over the past 15 years at boosting the percentage of their poor or minority students who are proficient in reading, math or science. The study also finds that California, Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, New York, and Texas are national leaders in education reform--leading the nation with a dedication to solid standards, tough accountability, and greater school choice can yield better classroom results." READ THE REPORT BY CLICKING ON THIS LINK.
Video-gaming American schools
Date CapturedThursday October 19, 2006 09:18 AM
The Enquirer reports, "One of the nation's most prestigious scientific groups on Tuesday put video games into play in an ambitious new bid to transform American education. The Federation of American Scientists called for major investment in digital educational games that could reshape how students learn and workers are trained for 21st century jobs."
CSRQ Center Report on Middle and High School Comprehensive School Reform Models
Date CapturedFriday October 06, 2006 08:31 AM
This Comprehensive School Reform Quality Center report "serves as a consumer guide that will help decision makers sort through claims about which school reform approaches could truly meet the needs of students. The report is the first comprehensive review of middle and high school whole-school reform models ever issued. To prepare this report, the CSRQ Center screened nearly 1,500 documents and reviewed 197 studies on 18 widely implemented middle and high school models. We used rigorous standards that are aligned with the requirements for scientifically based research established by NCLB. Each model is rated on a number of dimensions, including evidence of raising student achievement. The reviews of the individual models provide education decision makers with profiles of each model and the evidence needed to make decisions to meet locally defined needs."
Reforming Education in Florida: A Study Prepared by the Koret Task Force on K-12 Education, Hoover Institution 2006
Date CapturedTuesday September 12, 2006 02:04 PM
By Paul Peterson. This assessment by the Koret Task Force identifies reforms that have been undertaken and Florida's education policies related to accountability, curriculum reform, effective teaching, school choice, and organizational change, including voluntary preschool education, class-size reduction, and more effective resource management. Contributors include John E. Chubb, Williamson M. Evers, Chester E. Finn Jr., Eric A. Hanushek, Paul T. Hill, E. D. Hirsch, Caroline M. Hoxby, Terry M. Moe, Paul E. Peterson, Diane Ravitch, and Herbert J. Walberg. Additional contributors include Paul Clopton, Elena Llaudet, Sonali Murarka, and Marguerite Roza. (Chapters of the book can be viewed.)
The 38th Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools
Date CapturedTuesday August 22, 2006 10:47 AM
(September 2006) By LOWELL C. ROSE executive director emeritus of Phi Delta Kappa International and ALEC M. GALLUP, co-chairman, with George Gallup, Jr., of the Gallup Organization, Princeton, N.J. "In probing the public’s opinions of NCLB, the PDK/Gallup poll finds that there is widespread support for the law’s goals -- closing the achievement gap between African American and Latino students and their white peers and improving educational outcomes for all students -- but broad disagreement with its specific strategies. When asked whether testing students in only English and math, as currently required by NCLB, can give a fair picture of a school, 81% of the public say no. And 78% are worried that the law’s focus on these two subjects will mean less emphasis on other subjects. The poll finds that two-thirds of those surveyed oppose measuring school success by the percentage of students passing a single statewide test, while 81% prefer measuring the improvement that students make during the year."
The Condition of Education in Brief 2006
Date CapturedSunday August 20, 2006 03:46 PM
Report topics covered "include: public and private enrollment in elementary/secondary education; projections of undergraduate enrollment; racial/ethnic distribution of public school students; student achievement from the National Assessment of Educational Progress in reading, mathematics, and science; adult literacy; status dropout rates; immediate transition to college; school violence and safety; educational attainment; parental choice of schools; expenditures for elementary and secondary education, and federal grants and loans to undergraduate students." Livingston, A. (2006). The Condition of Education 2006 in Brief (NCES 2006-072). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Just for the Kids Best Practice Studies: Findings from New York Schools
Date CapturedWednesday July 19, 2006 08:14 AM
Research teams investigated 10 consistently higher performing and five averageperforming elementary schools to determine the differences in practices between higher and average performing elementary schools.
Measured Progress: A Report on the High School Reform Movement
Date CapturedMonday June 26, 2006 08:53 AM
Studies on the impact of the wide-ranging efforts over the past half-decade to reform the nation's public high schools have produced important—and encouraging—findings, researcher Craig Jerald reveals in a new Education Sector report titled "Measured Progress: A Report on the High School Reform Movement."
DOES WHOLE-SCHOOL REFORM BOOST STUDENT PERFORMANCE? THE CASE OF NEW YORK CITY
Date CapturedSaturday June 17, 2006 11:52 AM
Robert Bifulco, William Duncombe, John Yinger. Education Finance and Accountability Program (EFAP). Thousands of schools around the country have implemented whole-school reform programs to boost student performance. This paper uses quasi-experimental methods to estimate the impact of whole-school reform on students’ reading performance in New York City, where various reform programs were adopted in dozens of troubled elementary schools in the mid- 1990s. Two popular reform programs—the School Development Program and Success for All—do not significantly increase reading scores but might have if they had been fully implemented. The More Effective Schools program does boost reading scores, particularly for the poorest students, but only when program “trainers” remain in the school and the students are native English speakers.
Reforms That Could Help Narrow the Achievement Gap
Date CapturedThursday June 15, 2006 09:08 AM
Richard Rothstein, Research Associate of the Economic Policy Institute, outlines a series of reforms, in addition to school improvement, that could help narrow the achievement gap.
Money Matters
Date CapturedTuesday May 30, 2006 05:48 PM
An interview with Eric Hanushek
Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students: A Joint Responsibility Between K-12 and Postsecondary Education
Date CapturedFriday May 19, 2006 05:26 PM
Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students: A Joint Responsibility Between K-12 and Postsecondary Education—Michael W. Kirst and Andrea Venezia
Meeting Five Critical Challenges of High School Reform: Lessons from Research on Three Reform Models
Date CapturedMonday May 01, 2006 11:29 AM
Janet Quint , 2006. Recent MDRC evaluations of three high school reform models — Career Academies, First Things First, and Talent Development — offer hope that comprehensive programs can improve low-performing high schools. This research synthesis for policymakers and practitioners offers practical lessons for creating personalized learning environments, helping struggling freshmen, improving instruction, preparing students for the world beyond high school, and stimulating change in overstressed high schools.
What’s better and what's not
Date CapturedFriday February 24, 2006 06:14 PM
Catalyst Chicago, 2006. What’s better and what’s not. Data on key measures of school improvement under Chicago Mayor Daley.

School Safety

EDUCATION INTERRUPTED: The Growing Use of Suspensions in New York City’s Public Schools
Date CapturedThursday October 13, 2011 04:16 PM
This report analyzes 449,513 suspensions served by New York City students from 1999 to 2009 to draw a picture of zero tolerance practices in the nation’s largest school district. The number of suspensions served each school year has nearly doubled in a decade—even though the student population has decreased over the same period—sending a clear message that public education is a reward for “good” behavior, rather than a fundamental right. This section explains the methodology we used to analyze the suspension data, and provides valuable background on zero tolerance discipline. Section II provides an overview of New York City disciplinary policies and practices. It examines the ever- increasing emphasis on out-of-class and out-of-school suspensions in New York City’s Discipline Code, which governs student behavior. This section also analyzes the impact that NYPD school safety officers have had on the increasing reliance on suspensions and arrests as primary disciplinary tools. Section III analyzes 10 years of school discipline data in New York City, explaining the data behind our conclusions. Finally, the report concludes with our recommendations for the DOE, as well as city and state lawmakers.
The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting
Date CapturedFriday March 11, 2011 07:35 PM
FERPA does not preclude an institution’s compliance with the timely warning provision of the campus security regulations. FERPA recognizes that information can, in case of an emergency, be released without consent when needed to protect the health and safety of others. In addition, if institutions utilize information from the records of a campus law enforcement unit to issue a timely warning, FERPA is not implicated as those records are not protected by FERPA. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting, Washington, D.C., 2011.
Educational Facilities Disaster and Crisis Management Guidebook
Date CapturedMonday August 20, 2007 07:26 PM
Florida Department of Education
Emergency Management Planning for Schools and School Districts
Date CapturedMonday August 20, 2007 07:16 PM
Department of Education, Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools.
US Department of Education -- Office of Inspector General (OIG) Perspective on the Unsafe School Choice Option
Date CapturedFriday August 10, 2007 08:14 AM
We suggest that the Department and Congress, in considering legislative changes, require states to ensure that their USCO policies meet the following basic requirements: 1) All violent incidents, according to state code, are factored into the PDS determination, without the use of disciplinary action qualifiers; 2) Benchmarks for determining PDS are set at reasonable levels that are supported by objective and reliable data; and 3) PDS are identified based upon the most current year of data. These suggestions are intended to affect immediate improvement of the USCO in its current state. However, based on our audit work and further research, there is an apparent reluctance to fully comply with the USCO provision. Therefore, we are also offering our perspective on more in-depth changes to the provision that should help USCO to be better received by the education community, and therefore, encourage more willing compliance. The lack of incentive to comply with USCO will need to be addressed and resolved in order for the provision to realize its full potential as a tool for improving the level of safety in our nation’s schools.
Guidelines for Working with Law Enforcement Agencies
Date CapturedWednesday August 08, 2007 12:15 PM
By Michael Corn. EQ -- Volume 30 Number 3 2007. Checklist: * Create a policy to address the handling of all legal documents. * Form a team consisting of the security officer, legal counsel, and campus police. * Put campus legal counsel on your telephone speed-dial. * Meet with provost and/or chancellor to discuss law enforcement requests and investigations. * Review and document the salient features of your environment, including your institutional policies on data release and retention. * Understand your obligations with regard to confidentiality. * Discuss with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation whom you wish to inform of the investigation and why. * Work with the agent(s) in charge of an investigation to review what they are looking for and what will not be useful to them. * Develop internal procedures that control the materials and information of legally restricted information. Buy a safe for storing legal materials. * Work with law enforcement agents to better understand your environment and narrow the scope of information requests.
Most School Districts Have Developed Emergency Management Plans, but Would Benefit from Additional Federal Guidance
Date CapturedThursday June 14, 2007 02:07 PM
GAO Report: While most school districts have procedures in their plans for staff roles and responsibilities, for example, school districts have not widely employed such procedures as, academic instruction via local radio or television, for continuing student education in the event of an extended school closure, such as might occur during a pandemic. Likewise, while many districts have procedures for special needs students, GAO found during site visits that some of these procedures may not fully ensure the safety of these students in an emergency. Finally, while most school districts practice their emergency management plans annually within the school community, GAO estimates that over one-quarter of school districts have never trained with any first responders and over two-thirds of school districts do not regularly train with community partners on how to implement their school district emergency management plans. Many school districts experience challenges in planning for emergencies, and some school districts face difficulties in communicating and coordinating with first responders and parents, but most do not have such challenges with students. Based on GAO’s survey of school districts, in many school districts officials struggle to balance priorities related to educating students and other administrative responsibilities with activities for emergency management and consider a lack of equipment, training for staff, and personnel with expertise in the area of emergency planning as challenges. In an estimated 39 percent of school districts with emergency management plans, officials experienced a lack of partnerships, limited time or funding to plan, or lack of interoperability between equipment used by school districts and first responders.
Report to the President on Issues Raised by the Virginia Tech Tragedy
Date CapturedWednesday June 13, 2007 08:11 PM
Key Findings -- *Critical Information Sharing Faces Substantial Obstacles: Education officials, healthcare providers, law enforcement personnel, and others are not fully informed about when they can share critical information on persons who are likely to be a danger to self or others, and the resulting confusion may chill legitimate information sharing. *Accurate and Complete Information on Individuals Prohibited from Possessing Firearms is Essential to Keep Guns Out of the Wrong Hands: State laws and practices do not uniformly ensure that information on persons restricted from possessing firearms is appropriately captured and available to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). *Improved Awareness and Communication are Key to Prevention: It is important that parents, students, and teachers learn to recognize warning signs and encourage those who need help to seek it, so that people receive the care they need and our communities are safe. *It is Critical to Get People with Mental Illness the Services They Need: Meeting the challenge of adequate and appropriate community integration of people with mental illness requires effective coordination of community service providers who are sensitive to the interests of safety, privacy, and provision of care. *Where We Know What to Do, We Have to be Better at Doing It: For the many states and communities that have already adopted programs, including emergency preparedness and violence prevention plans, to address school and community violence, the challenge is fully implementing these programs through practice and effective communication.
District Attorneys, Police Associations, Lawmakers and former Gang Members to Unveil Proposal to Stop Gang Activity in New York Schools, other measures
Date CapturedThursday March 22, 2007 09:00 AM
Increase in gang related criminal activity is on the rise throughout New York State. A state commission report on the growing problem and its recommendations have not been acted upon by the state legislature. Lawmakers and law enforcement agencies will unveil will criminalize gang activity on and near school grounds and renew calls for other anti gang measures lingering in Albany.
Crime, Violence, Discipline and Safety in U.S. Public Schools: Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2003-04
Date CapturedTuesday December 12, 2006 11:20 AM
This NCES report provides a first look at select findings from the 2003–04 SSOCS data. Focusing on the three themes emphasized in the survey, descriptive statistics are provided on: the frequency of criminal incidents at school, the use of disciplinary actions, and the efforts to prevent and reduce crime at school. Guerino, P., Hurwitz, M.D., Noonan, M.E., and Kaffenberger, S.M. (2006). Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools: Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety: 2003-04 (NCES 2007-302). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
School safety: ICSD security upgrades necessary
Date CapturedTuesday December 05, 2006 07:49 AM
Ithaca Journal opines, "The ICSD Board of Education is currently weighing whether to invest $500,000 in a new security system that incorporates a key card access system and cameras. The money would come in the bond referendum the BOE is deciding to bring before voters early next year. It is still too early to tell whether each component on the district's wish list is worth the money needed to pay for a new security system. But the events of Nov. 13 should give everyone in the district something to think about when deciding what should and should not be approved. Perhaps our old system of locking doors just isn't working."
Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2006
Date CapturedMonday December 04, 2006 02:12 PM
A joint effort by the Bureau of Justice Statistics and National Center for Education Statistics, this annual report examines crime occurring in school as well as on the way to and from school. It provides the most current detailed statistical information to inform the Nation on the nature of crime in schools. This report presents data on crime at school from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and the general population from an array of sources--the National Crime Victimization Survey, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the School Survey on Crime and Safety and the School and Staffing Survey. Data on crime away from school are also presented to place school crime in the context of crime in the larger society. Dinkes, R., Cataldi, E.F., Kena, G., and Baum, K. (2006). Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2006 (NCES 2007–003/NCJ 214262). U.S. Departments of Education and Justice. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
BAT BAN OFF BASE: SCHOOLS
Date CapturedSunday November 12, 2006 07:37 AM
NY Post reports, "The Catholic High Schools' Athletic Association sent a letter to all 51 council members urging them not to vote for the measure, which would require all high schools in the city to use wooden bats for safety reasons."
Policing as Education Policy: A briefing on the initial impact of the Impact Schools program
Date CapturedTuesday August 29, 2006 12:50 PM
Prepared by Sharon Balmer with Travis Dale, Bethany Aaronson, and John M. Beam. Brief on Impact Schools reports, "In addition to having significantly higher rates of suspension and police incidents and significantly lower attendance rates than most non-Impact schools, Impact Schools were significantly different from other city high schools in a number of ways." National Center for Schools and Communities, Fordham University, August 2006.
GUIDELINES AND SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE PROCUREMENT AND USE OF ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE PRODUCTS FOR ALL PUBLIC AND NONPUBLIC ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN NEW YORK STATE
Date CapturedTuesday August 15, 2006 05:37 PM
New York State Office of General Services, August 4, 2006. These Guidelines and Specifications were developed in consultation with representatives of the Department of Environmental Conservation, Department of Health, Department of Labor and State Education Department, as directed by Chapter 584 of the Laws of New York, 2005.
Tables from the School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS)
Date CapturedFriday August 11, 2006 11:49 AM
"The School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) is a nationally representative sample of regular public elementary, middle, secondary and combined schools. Completed by school principals, the survey asks about school safety practices, school violence prevention programs, and the frequency of school crime and violence."
APA: ZERO TOLERANCE POLICIES ARE NOT AS EFFECTIVE AS THOUGHT IN REDUCING VIOLENCE AND PROMOTING LEARNING IN SCHOOL (READ REPORT)
Date CapturedThursday August 10, 2006 01:10 PM
APA Task Force on Zero Tolerance reports, "By changing the relationship of education and juvenile justice, zero tolerance may shift the locus of discipline from relatively inexpensive actions in the school setting to the highly costly processes of arrest and incarceration. In so doing, zero tolerance policies have created unintended consequences for students, families, and communities." Task Force on Zero Tolerance: Chair: Cecil R. Reynolds, PhD, Texas A&M University; Jane Conoley, EdD, University of California at Santa Barbara; Enedina Garcia-Vazquez, PhD, New Mexico State University; Sandra Graham, PhD, University of California at Los Angeles; Peter Sheras, PhD, University of Virginia; and Russell Skiba, PhD, Indiana University.
Bully Police USA
Date CapturedTuesday August 08, 2006 12:18 PM
A Watch-dog Organization - Advocating for Bullied Children
OFFICE OF THE NEW YORK STATE COMPTROLLER DIVISION OF STATE SERVICES STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT REPORTING OF VIOLENT AND DISRUPTIVE INCIDENTS BY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Date CapturedSunday July 09, 2006 09:39 AM
Report 2005-S-38, "We visited a representative sample of high schools and found that, at a majority of the schools, at least one-third of the violent and disruptive incidents documented in the schools’ records were not reported to SED. At several schools, more than 80 percent of the documented incidents were not reported to SED, and in a number of instances, the most serious types of incidents were unreported, such as sexual offenses and incidents involving the use of a weapon."
Best Practices of Community Policing in Gang Intervention and Gang Violence Prevention
Date CapturedFriday June 09, 2006 08:29 AM
United States Conference of Mayors Best Practices series publication. Mayors have taken the lead in building and sustaining effective programs against gang crime in their cities, and this publication looks at their success stories.
School Bus Pollution Report Card 2006
Date CapturedWednesday May 24, 2006 09:13 PM
The School Bus Pollution Report Card 2006 report analyzes the amount of pollution released from the average state school bus. Each state received a letter grade (A B, C, or D) for estimated tailpipe emissions of soot, which warrants the most concern because of its potential to cause toxic “hot spots”—areas of higher exposure for children in or near buses.
OFFICE OF THE NEW YORK STATE COMPTROLLER DIVISION OF STATE SERVICES STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT REPORTING OF VIOLENT AND DISRUPTIVE INCIDENTS BY PUBLIC SCHOOLS Report 2005-S-38
Date CapturedTuesday May 23, 2006 06:44 AM
Violent incidents in New York State high schools have not been accurately reported to the State Education Department (SED) and SED has not done enough to address misreporting problems or to effectively identify schools with serious violence problems, according to an audit released by Comptroller Alan G. Hevesi.
SCHOOL SAFETY
Date CapturedMonday May 22, 2006 03:42 PM
To address issues of school safety and violence prevention, the Safe Schools Against Violence in Education Act (SAVE) was passed by the New York State Legislature and signed into law by Governor George E. Pataki on July 24, 2000. Project SAVE culminates the work of the Task Force on School Violence chaired by Lieutenant Governor Mary Donohue. The New York State Board of Regents approved Regulations of the Commissioner of Education to ensure compliance with the new legislation. This site provides resources to assist schools in the development and maintenance of safe school environments.
GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN REPORTING VIOLENT AND DISRUPTIVE INCIDENTS
Date CapturedMonday May 22, 2006 08:46 AM
New York State Education Department school safety glossary of terms.

School Size

Inside Public Education 2007
Date CapturedFriday March 09, 2007 10:56 AM
Inside Public Education reports the results of a survey conducted by the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion and funded by the Dyson Foundation. Residents of Dutchess and Ulster Counties in New York were interviewed about the public schools in their communities. They shared their opinions, experiences, and insights about what they consider to be the best and the worst of public education in the school district where they live.
So Many Schools, So Few Options:How Mayor Bloomberg’s Small High School Reforms Deny Full Access to English Language Learners
Date CapturedWednesday November 29, 2006 07:08 AM
Key findings: ELLs Are Not Given Full and Equitable Access to All Small High Schools, Parents of ELLs and Students Reported Barriers in the High School Admissions and Enrollment Process, The Small School Policy for ELLs Appears to be Forcing ELLs to Remain in Large High Schools that Do Not Have Services to Meet Their Needs , Small Schools are Not Being Created in Queens, in which the Largest Number of ELLs Reside. A joint report by: The New York Immigration Coalition & Advocates for Children of New York In collaboration with: Chhaya Community Development Corporation Chinese Progressive Association Chinese-American Planning Council Council of Peoples Organization Haitian Americans United for Progress Make the Road by Walking Metropolitan Russian American Parents Association November 2006.
Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003-04
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 12:53 AM
NCES: The data include such characteristics as the numbers of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Several findings were: These 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers, in 2003-04. The 100 largest districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2002-03. Across these districts, the averaged freshman graduation rate was 68.8 percent. In 19 of the 100 largest districts the rate was 80 percent or higher. The rate was less than 50 percent in 8 of the 100 largest districts. Three states – California, Florida, and Texas – accounted for 41 of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $4,413 in Alpine School District, Utah to a high of $17,652 in Newark City, New Jersey. Dalton, B., Sable, J., and Hoffman, L. (2006). Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003–04 (NCES 2006-329). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.

School-Prison-Pipeline

EDUCATION INTERRUPTED: The Growing Use of Suspensions in New York City’s Public Schools
Date CapturedThursday October 13, 2011 04:16 PM
This report analyzes 449,513 suspensions served by New York City students from 1999 to 2009 to draw a picture of zero tolerance practices in the nation’s largest school district. The number of suspensions served each school year has nearly doubled in a decade—even though the student population has decreased over the same period—sending a clear message that public education is a reward for “good” behavior, rather than a fundamental right. This section explains the methodology we used to analyze the suspension data, and provides valuable background on zero tolerance discipline. Section II provides an overview of New York City disciplinary policies and practices. It examines the ever- increasing emphasis on out-of-class and out-of-school suspensions in New York City’s Discipline Code, which governs student behavior. This section also analyzes the impact that NYPD school safety officers have had on the increasing reliance on suspensions and arrests as primary disciplinary tools. Section III analyzes 10 years of school discipline data in New York City, explaining the data behind our conclusions. Finally, the report concludes with our recommendations for the DOE, as well as city and state lawmakers.
Breaking Schools’ Rules: A Statewide Study of How School Discipline Relates to Students’ Success and Juvenile Justice Involvement
Date CapturedTuesday August 02, 2011 10:09 AM
This report was prepared by the Council of State Governments Justice Center in partnership with the Public Policy Research Institute at Texas A&M University. Key findings in the report include the following: 1. Nearly six in ten public school students studied were suspended or expelled at least once between their seventh- and twelfth-grade school years. 2. African-American students and those with particular educational disabilities were disproportionately likely to be removed from the classroom for disciplinary reasons. 3. Students who were suspended and/or expelled, particularly those who were repeatedly disciplined, were more likely to be held back a grade or to drop out than were students not involved in the disciplinary system. 4. When a student was suspended or expelled, his or her likelihood of being involved in the juvenile justice system the subsequent year increased significantly. 5. Suspension and expulsion rates among schools—even those schools with similar student compositions and campus characteristics—varied significantly.

Segregation

Money, Not Race, Fuels New Push to Buoy Schools
Date CapturedSaturday June 30, 2007 11:13 AM
NY Times TAMAR LEWIN and DAVID M. HERSZENHORN report, "For several years, two lawyers intent on helping black children do as well in school as white children had a kind of roadshow: Michael A. Rebell would describe the recent successes of state-court litigation, forcing more financing for poor children’s schools, as a matter of basic equity. But James Ryan would argue that integration was the best approach. "
Rescuing Brown v. Board of Education: Profiles of Twelve School Districts Pursuing Socioeconomic School Integration
Date CapturedFriday June 29, 2007 02:07 PM
By RICHARD D. KAHLENBERG, SENIOR FELLOW AT THE CENTURY FOUNDATION concludes, "Making American schools integrated is tough work, requiring strong political leadership and a sustained commitment to the promise of equal opportunity. The U.S. Supreme Court’s decisions in the Louisville and Seattle cases present new obstacles, but across the country, school districts are not giving up, and indeed, are coming up with an alternative that can be an even more powerful engine for social mobility."
District using busing information in study
Date CapturedMonday May 07, 2007 10:56 AM
uticaOD.com reports, "School district leaders will rely on computer software programs to study the city's student population."
The Mexican American Struggle for Equal Educational Opportunity in Mendez v. Westminster: Helping to Pave the Way for Brown v. Board of Education
Date CapturedWednesday March 07, 2007 11:46 AM
RICHARD R. VALENCIA, professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the College of Education of the University of Texas at Austin writes, "Few people in the United States are aware of the central role that Mexican Americans have played in some of the most important legal struggles regarding school desegregation. The most significant such case is Mendez v. Westminster (1946), a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of more than 5,000 Mexican American students in Orange County, California. The Mendez case became the first successful constitutional challenge to segregation. In fact, in Mendez the U.S. District Court judge ruled that the Mexican American students' rights were being violated under the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The decision was affirmed by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Although the Mendez case was never appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, a number of legal scholars at that time hailed it as a case that could have accomplished what Brown eventually did eight years later: a reversal of the High Court's 1896 ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, which had sanctioned legal segregation for nearly 60 years." Teachers College Record Volume 107 Number 3, 2005, p. 389-423 http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11792, Date Accessed: 3/7/2007 11:44:54 AM
The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education
Date CapturedSaturday December 02, 2006 07:50 AM
The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education: A Briefing Before The United States Commission on Civil Rights Held in Washington, D.C., July 28, 2006 Briefing Report, "Based on the record, the Commission issued a number of findings, including: • There is little evidence that racial and ethnic diversity in elementary and secondary schools results in significant improvements in academic performance; • Studies on the effect of school racial composition on academic achievement often suggest modest and inconsistent benefits; • Studies of whether racial and ethnic diversity result in significant social and noneducational benefits report varied results; • Much of the early research indicating educational benefits resulting from racial and ethnic diversity in elementary and secondary schools suffered from serious methodological weaknesses; • A preliminary review of data on the overall relationship between school racial composition and student achievement as measured by the 2003 National Assessment of Educational Progress scores does not indicate a consistent strong relationship between the two after controlling for socioeconomic status; • While there are many research studies indicating that desegregated schooling is associated with higher educational and occupational aspirations , and to a modest degree, attainment for African-American students, methodological weaknesses in these studies make it difficult to isolate school racial composition as the cause of these aspirations and attainments; • While recent studies examining the relationship between desegregation and future wages found a small positive relationship after controlling for self-selection bias, research evidence on the relationship of school racial composition and actual wages is less definitive; • More recent surveys have indicated generally positive reactions to school desegregation, such as cross-racial friendships and greater understanding of racial and cultural differences, but some of these surveys do not definitively identify a causal relationship between the two."
“Does Segregation Still Matter? The Impact of Social Composition on Academic Achievement in High School”
Date CapturedWednesday June 28, 2006 10:26 AM
Russell Rumberger with Gregory Palardy. Teachers College Record, 107 (2005), 1999-2045. This article addresses the question of whether school characteristics can be changed by policies to reform schools and funding systems versus policies to desegregate schools.
Denver Public Schools: Resegregation, Latino Style
Date CapturedWednesday June 14, 2006 07:50 AM
By Chungmei Lee, The Civil Rights Project. This paper, the first of two reports, focuses on the dynamics of segregation, demographic changes, and implications for graduation rates in the Denver Public Schools. The relationship of the dramatic demographic changes to segregation trends is examined by measuring the average exposure of students to all racial groups, as well as to each other and the concentration of students in racially isolated schools during the five years preceding the 1995 Keyes decision and in the eight subsequent years following.
The Choice is Ours: Expanding Educational Opportunity for all Twin Cities Children
Date CapturedWednesday May 24, 2006 08:40 AM
A new report by the Institute on Race & Poverty (IRP) at the University of Minnesota reveals the disturbing extent of school segregation in the Twin Cities region. The authors of the report envision a brighter future if an already successful school choice program is expanded. The report, “The Choice Is Ours: Expanding Educational Opportunity for all Twin Cities Children,” describes how economic and racial segregation harms children and the region.
Racial Transformation and the Changing Nature of Segregation
Date CapturedSunday January 15, 2006 09:04 AM
By Gary Orfield and Chungmei Lee. THE CIVILS RIGHTS PROJECT, HARVARD UNIVERSITY. January, 2006.
A Multiracial Society with Segregated Schools: Are We Losing the Dream?
Date CapturedMonday December 12, 2005 12:04 PM
By Erica Frankenberg, Chungmei Lee, and Gary Orfield. THE CIVIL RIGHTS PROJECT, HARVARD UNIVERSITY. January, 2003.

Social and Human Capital

The Return on Investment for Improving California's High School Graduation Rate
Date CapturedFriday August 24, 2007 04:44 PM
Belfield, C. and Levin, H., "We review a large range of educational investments that might ensure more students graduate from high school in California. We identify educational interventions for which there is reasonably solid evidence of their efficacy to raise the rate of high school graduation, those for which there is promise, and those for which we have no relevant information. For each of these interventions we calculate the costs to the taxpayer of delivering the intervention. We calculate the delivery costs and the cost of producing one extra graduate. We then compare these costs to the economic benefits to the taxpayer and to the overall citizenry of California from each additional high school graduate. Under most scenarios, the economic benefits are substantially greater than the costs. However, this conclusion is sensitive to the funding source: federal governments gain significantly more from education than state and local governments, even as the latter are primarily responsible for funding."
The Economic Losses from High School Dropouts in California
Date CapturedFriday August 24, 2007 07:47 AM
Belfield, C. and Levin, H. "This paper calculates the fiscal and social burdens from high school dropouts in California. We map educational attainment in California for current cohorts of students and young adults. This reveals in stark terms the low levels of educational attainment across the state. Next, the amount of government spending in California is catalogued; this shows how much is spent on various services and by which levels of government. Our main focus is on the economic consequences of inadequate education on earnings, on tax revenues, and on spending on health, crime, and welfare (net of the resources required to provide additional education). For each of these four domains the effect of education has been assessed statistically. This effect is then multiplied by the respective economic burden from each cohort of 20-year olds who fail to graduate in order to get an overall total cost. Using a consistent accounting framework, these costs generate a figure of what is being lost by failing to ensure that all students graduate from high school. The economic magnitudes are substantial."
Workplace Rules for Students
Date CapturedMonday June 25, 2007 08:50 PM
New York State Department of Labor
Teaching city pupils how to succeed in business, life
Date CapturedThursday April 26, 2007 09:30 AM
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle contributor Marcia O'Brien, assistant professor, Roberts Wesleyan College opines, "At Roberts, our students designed business camps for teens: Women of Hope for girls and Men of Standard for boys. These camps, held on our campus during the February school break, teach young people how to start and succeed in their own businesses. They live and dine on campus; take finance, business ethics and marketing classes; develop life skills, and more. The camps are free for the students, paid for by grants and Roberts Wesleyan College. "
It takes a village to teach a child to read
Date CapturedWednesday January 03, 2007 06:29 AM
Ithaca Journal contributor and reading teacher Carol Cedarholm writes, "I don't mean to minimize the importance of teaching method on reading success. In fact the best teacher won't be successful using an ineffective method. Neither will an excellent teacher be successful using Direct Instruction/Reading Master if the child is hungry, hasn't slept, hasn't been read to, can't focus, has only 30 minutes of reading instruction four times a week, etc."
Kids need balance in school, expert says
Date CapturedSaturday October 14, 2006 09:18 AM
News Journal (Delaware) reports, "Comer [renowned child psychiatrist] said he had to tell his own story first so the audience of education and health professionals could see where he was coming from. He grew up poor in Chicago as one of five children, with a mother who was the daughter of a sharecropper and a father who was a laborer. Yet they provided their children with warmth and attention, taught them social skills, made them feel good about themselves and exposed them to museums and anything else they thought was educational."
It Takes a Parent: Transforming Education in the Wake of the No Child Left Behind Act
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 01:07 AM
"With the goal of demonstrating the importance of parental involvement as a key strategy for improving student success, this report provides recommendations for education leaders and policymakers. It focuses on three major strands that are crucial to effective parental involvement: 1. Information: The opportunities and challenges of parental awareness about student and school performance; 2. Engagement: The importance of meaningful parental engagement with school officials and teachers; and 3. Advocacy: The critical role that effective parent advocacy, based on good information and informed engagement, plays in student and school performance." The report was produced by Appleseed, in coordination with several other key law firms and groups. Law firm, Holland & Knight, coordinated and carried out much of the research and drafted the final report, with assistance in two states from volunteers from DLA Piper. The National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Columbia University and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP played key roles in gathering and assessing information.
Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003
Date CapturedTuesday September 05, 2006 11:00 AM
This report examines the use of computers and the Internet by American children enrolled in nursery school and students in kindergarten through grade 12. One of the more important findings presented in the report is that schools appear to help narrow the disparities between different types of students in terms of computer use. Differences in the rates of computer use are smaller at school than they are at home when considering such characteristics as race/ethnicity, family income, and parental education. DeBell, M., and Chapman, C. (2006). Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003 (NCES 2006– 065). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2006
Date CapturedFriday July 14, 2006 05:57 PM
"The first section, Population and Family Characteristics, describes the context in which children live (including aspects such as changes in children’s family settings and living arrangements). The sections that follow highlight indicators of child well-being in four key areas: Economic Security, Health, Behavior and Social Environment, and Education."
America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2005
Date CapturedThursday July 13, 2006 10:50 PM
America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2005 is a biennial report to the Nation on the condition of children in America. Nine contextual measures describe the changing population, family, and environmental context in which children are living, and 25 indicators depict the well-being of children in the areas of economic security, health, behavior and social environment, and education. Racial categories were expanded from four racial groups (American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian, Black, and White) to five racial groups (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and White). Expansion of the racial categories and the introduction of multiple race categories—have a direct impact on many of the indicators presented in this report, particularly with respect to trend analyses. Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics Highlights. DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Rejecting the 65-Percent Solution
Date CapturedThursday July 06, 2006 10:34 AM
A Monthly Column by EFAP Director John Yinger, July 2006. Yinger writes, "The real problem is that children in high-poverty schools cannot receive an adequate education unless their district spends far more than other districts on many items, such as counseling, health, nutrition, safety, and parental involvement."
Social Isolation in America: Changes in Core Discussion Networks over Two Decades
Date CapturedFriday June 23, 2006 11:03 AM
AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW, 2006, VOL. 71 (June:353–375). Most people have densely interconnected confidants similar to them. Some changes reflect the changing demographics of the U.S. population. Educational heterogeneity of social ties has decreased, racial heterogeneity has increased. The data may overestimate the number of social isolates, but these shrinking networks reflect an important social change in America.
The Foundation for Child Development Child and Youth Well-Being Index (CWI), 1975-2004
Date CapturedThursday March 30, 2006 11:27 AM
The Foundation for Child Development Child and Youth Well-Being Index (CWI), 1975-2004, with Projections for 2005. A composite index of trends in the well-being of America’s children and youth. Kenneth C. Land, Project Coordinator, March 15, 2006, Duke University Durham, North Carolina. Foundation for Child Development study paints a mixed picture for America's youth, with few gains in educational achievement, even as drug use, pregnancy rates, and youth crime have fallen.
KIDS COUNT Data Book
Date CapturedMonday February 06, 2006 09:56 PM
KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2005. The Annie E. Casey Foundation. Online database reports for a geographic area (Profiles) or to compare geographic areas on a topic (Ranking, Maps, and Line Graphs).
Expanded School Mental Health: A Collaborative Community-School Example
Date CapturedSunday January 15, 2006 03:37 PM
Source: Children & Schools. Weist, Mark D; Ambrose, Melissa Grady; Lewis, Charla P. School-based mental health programs are becoming increasingly prominent.

Social Networking

FERPA and Social Media
Date CapturedThursday March 10, 2011 02:50 PM
When students are assigned to post information to public social media platforms outside of the university LMS, they should be informed that their material may be viewed by others. Students should not be required to release personal information on a public site. Instructor comments or grades on student material should not be made public. (Interestingly, grades given by other students on “peer-graded” work can be made public under FERPA). (ACE, 2008) While not clearly required by law, students under the age of 18 should get their parent’s consent to post public work. FERPA does not forbid instructors from using social media in the classroom, but common sense guidelines should be used to ensure the protection of students.
On the Leakage of Personally Identi?able Information Via Online Social Networks
Date CapturedWednesday June 02, 2010 10:01 PM
Balachander Krishnamurthy and Craig E. Wills - [Abstract For purposes of this paper, we de?ne “Personally identi?- able information” (PII) as information which can be used to distinguish or trace an individual’s identity either alone or when combined with other information that is linkable to a speci?c individual. The popularity of Online Social Net- works (OSN) has accelerated the appearance of vast amounts of personal information on the Internet. Our research shows that it is possible for third-parties to link PII, which is leaked via OSNs, with user actions both within OSN sites and else- where on non-OSN sites. We refer to this ability to link PII and combine it with other information as “leakage”. We have identi?ed multiple ways by which such leakage occurs and discuss measures to prevent it.]

Special Education

Demographic and School Characteristics of Students Receiving Special Education in the Elementary Grades
Date CapturedFriday July 27, 2007 09:48 AM
Findings from the analysis indicate that for the cohort of students beginning kindergarten in 1998, specific learning disabilities and speech or language impairments were the most prevalent primary disabilities over the grades studied. The percentage of the student cohort receiving special education grew from 4.1 percent in kindergarten to 11.9 percent of students in fifth grade. The results also indicate that higher percentages of boys than girls and of poor students than nonpoor students received special education.
THE CITY OF NEW YORK OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER BUREAU OF MANAGEMENT AUDIT : AUDIT REPORT ON THE MONITORING AND TRACKING OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS BY THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Date CapturedThursday July 26, 2007 09:55 AM
MD06-073A -- June 29, 2007. "Based on our findings, we make nine recommendations, five of which are listed below. DOE should: Develop and enforce written formal policies and procedures to ensure that services are provided according to the provisions of each student’s IEP. Develop policies to ensure that all attendance forms and summaries are maintained as evidence of services provided. Ensure that providers fill in all required information on the special education attendance forms and sign the forms as certification of the delivery of services. Ensure that supervisory review of attendance records is performed and documented. Institute a control (e.g., periodically reconcile special education attendance forms with general education attendance forms) to help ensure that the days that services are provided are accurately recorded."
Sex Ed is About Safety
Date CapturedMonday July 23, 2007 09:53 AM
Special Eduction Law blogger Amanda Windom writes, "One of the most controversial topics we face in schools today is sex education. Schools in Illinois vary greatly in the curriculum they offer ranging from none at all to abstinence-only to comprehensive sex education. Putting aside the moral, religious and other debates, the main issue here is safety. Regardless of our personal feelings about the topic the fact remains that children and teens must be educated about sex in a meaningful way, and if they are not educated at school or by parents they will develop ideas based on things they learn from friends or in the media, often to their detriment."
Recommendations to Reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act
Date CapturedSunday June 10, 2007 01:20 PM
Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)
School Push-Outs: An Urban Case Study
Date CapturedWednesday April 25, 2007 11:46 AM
Elysa Hyman writes, "While the specter of the No Child Left Behind Act continues to loom over our nations’ schools, grassroots organizations, parent groups, attorneys, educators and policymakers must monitor their local school systems and take action if schools are engaging in exclusionary practices. National coalitions must be formed to highlight the unintended effects of the Act and to advocate reform of laws and policies that punish schools for trying to educate all students or that provide incentives for schools to push them out of the building."
Timing and Duration of Student Participation in Special Education in the Primary Grades
Date CapturedWednesday March 21, 2007 09:19 PM
Emily W. Holt, Daniel J. McGrath, and William L. Herring. This Issue Brief reports the timing of entry into special education and the number of grades in which students receive special education across the primary grades. About 12 percent of students receive special education in at least one of the grades: kindergarten, first, and third grade, including 16 percent of boys, 8 percent of girls, 18 percent of poor children, and 10 percent of nonpoor children. One in three students who receive special education in early grades, first receive special education in kindergarten. Half of those who begin special education in kindergarten are no longer receiving special education by third grade. In addition to students’ gender and poverty status, results are presented separately for other student and school characteristics, including race/ethnicity and school control, urbanicity, region, and poverty concentration. Data for this brief come from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Studies, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K).
Debunking a Special Education Myth
Date CapturedThursday March 08, 2007 08:38 AM
Jay P. Greene, professor of education reform, University of Arkansas, and a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research and Marcus A. Winters, senior research associate at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research and doctoral fellow at the University of Arkansas write, " Can spiraling special education costs explain why educational achievement remained stagnant over the past three decades while real education spending more than doubled? Policy makers, education researchers, and school district officials often make this claim. Special education students—goes the argument—are draining resources away from regular education students."
Special Education Muckrakers
Date CapturedSunday March 04, 2007 01:07 PM
The Special Education Muckrakers are people who care passionately about what happens to disabled kids in the public schools.
Overview of Public Elementary and Secondary Students, Staff, Schools, School Districts, Revenues, and Expenditures: School Year 2004-05 and Fiscal Year 2004
Date CapturedTuesday November 21, 2006 02:21 PM
This NCES report contains information from the 5 Common Core of Data (CCD) surveys: the 2004-05 state, local education agency, and school nonfiscal surveys for 2004-05 and the state and local education agency school finance surveys for fiscal year 2004. The report presents data about the students enrolled in public education, including the number of students by grade and the number receiving special education, migrant, or English language learner services. Some tables disaggregate the student data by racial/ethnic group or community characteristics such as rural - urban. The numbers and types of teachers, other education staff, schools, and local education agencies are also reported. Finance data include revenues by source (local, state, and federal) and total and per-pupil expenditures by function. Sable, J., and Hill, J. (2006). Overview of Public Elementary and Secondary Students, Staff, Schools, School Districts, Revenues, and Expenditures: School Year 2004–05 and Fiscal Year 2004 (NCES 2007-309). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Hands off our school!
Date CapturedThursday November 16, 2006 04:55 AM
NY Daily News reports on plans to tear down an upper East Side [New York City], "Supporters say the building, once known as Julia Rikers for its dangerous reputation, has reinvented itself as a home for six notable schools, including a performing arts high school, a school for autistic children and a school created to serve children of people who work in the area. Their objections were highlighted yesterday by Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez.."
Differentiated Curriculum Enhancement in Inclusive Middle School Science: Effects on Classroom and High-Stakes Tests
Date CapturedWednesday November 01, 2006 03:16 PM
By Mastropieri, Margo A; Scruggs, Thomas E; Norland, Jennifer J; Berkeley, Sheri; Et al. Researchers find, "The present investigation supports the effectiveness of using differentiated learning activities with peer partners in middle school inclusive science classes, not only on content posttests, but also on high-stakes end-of-year tests. When using peermediation combined with differentiated science activities, students appear to learn more content than when taught more traditionally, without peer- mediated learning activities."
Education Secretary Spellings: No Child act needs no changes
Date CapturedWednesday August 30, 2006 06:16 PM
AP reports, "Spellings said her job is to present Congress with good data to help lawmakers do their job. She said she is open-minded about ways to improve the law. But when asked if she meant the law is truly '99.9 percent' close to working properly, she said, 'I think it is that close.'"
Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities and Preschool Grants for Children With Disabilities
Date CapturedThursday August 24, 2006 11:20 AM
Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education: The Secretary issues final regulations governing the Assistance to States for Education of Children with Disabilities Program and the Preschool Grants for Children with Disabilities Program. These regulations are needed to implement changes made to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as amended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (Act or IDEA). DATES: These regulations take effect on October 13, 2006.
Helping Kids, Saving Money: How to Reform New York's Special Education System
Date CapturedSunday June 25, 2006 10:31 AM
By Jay P. Greene and Marcus A. Winters with Greg Forster, Empire Center Special Report 02-05. This report shows that New York can reduce special ed costs and enrollment--and improve parental satisfaction with the program as part of the bargain--by adopting two simple reforms: changing the formula funding special education from a "bounty" system to a "lump-sum" system; and implementing a voucher program for children in special education.

Standards and Assessment

Noncognitive Measures: The Academic Trend That Could Change Everything
Date CapturedFriday March 08, 2013 06:12 PM
Alan Boyle [For decades, standardized test scores, GPAs, and graduation ranks have been the gold standard in college admissions and hiring. But in recent years, there's been a shift to consider not just these hard numbers but also the more nuanced factors known as noncognitive measures that give a glimpse into who you are as a person and how likely you are to succeed, regardless of your knowledge level. Schools like Boston College and Tufts University and employers like Google want to know more than your test scores: they want to know about your personality and potential for achievement.]
It all adds up to success
Date CapturedWednesday June 13, 2007 10:15 AM
NY Daily News opines, "Next year, Bloomberg and Klein are giving teachers the ability to closely track how well students are learning, so those who lag can get immediate special attention. And the mayor and chancellor are giving parents report cards that will grade how individual schools are working. The trends are moving in the right direction after years of stagnation, and the innate abilities of thousands of kids are finally being unlocked."
Tests criticized as inconsistent
Date CapturedFriday June 08, 2007 08:22 AM
Poughkeepsie Journal reports, "The federal No Child Left Behind Act requires all public schools to improve their scores in state tests by a set percentage each year. What it doesn't determine is the content of those tests. Local critics say this is unfair because standards are literally 'all over the map.'"
Mapping 2005 State Proficiency Standards Onto the NAEP Scales
Date CapturedThursday June 07, 2007 11:04 AM
This report presents the results of applying a methodology for mapping state proficiency standards in reading and mathematics onto the appropriate NAEP scale, employing data from the 2004–05 academic year. The mapping exercise was carried out for both grades 4 and 8. For each of the four subject and grade combinations, the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards vary widely, spanning a range of 60 to 80 NAEP score points. Although there is an essential ambiguity in any attempt to place state standards on a common scale, the ranking of the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards offers an indicator of the relative stringency of those standards. There is a strong negative correlation between the proportions of students meeting the states’ proficiency standards and the NAEP score equivalents to those standards, suggesting that the observed heterogeneity in states’ reported percents proficient can be largely attributed to differences in the stringency of their standards. There is, at best, a weak relationship between the NAEP score equivalents for the state proficiency standard and the states’ average scores on NAEP. Finally, most of the NAEP score equivalents fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Proficient standard, and many fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Basic standard. This report presents the results of applying a methodology for mapping state proficiency standards in reading and mathematics onto the appropriate NAEP scale, employing data from the 2004–05 academic year. The mapping exercise was carried out for both grades 4 and 8. For each of the four subject and grade combinations, the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards vary widely, spanning a range of 60 to 80 NAEP score points. Although there is an essential ambiguity in any attempt to place state standards on a common scale, the ranking of the NAEP score equivalents to the states’ proficiency standards offers an indicator of the relative stringency of those standards. There is a strong negative correlation between the proportions of students meeting the states’ proficiency standards and the NAEP score equivalents to those standards, suggesting that the observed heterogeneity in states’ reported percents proficient can be largely attributed to differences in the stringency of their standards. There is, at best, a weak relationship between the NAEP score equivalents for the state proficiency standard and the states’ average scores on NAEP. Finally, most of the NAEP score equivalents fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Proficient standard, and many fall below the cut-point corresponding to the NAEP Basic standard.
Rigor at Risk: Reaffirming Quality in the High School Curriculum
Date CapturedWednesday May 16, 2007 07:10 AM
The Rigor at Risk report suggests that some students progress toward college readiness in high school, but many lose momentum during their last two years there. There are action steps that states and schools can take to improve the rigor of high school core courses: 1. Specify the number and kinds of courses that students need to take to graduate from high school ready for college and work. 2. Align high school course outcomes with state standards that are driven by the requirements of postsecondary education and work. 3. Hire qualified teachers and provide training or professional development support to help them improve the quality of the courses they teach. 4. Expand access for all students to high-quality, vertically aligned core courses. 5. Measure results at the course level.
Boosting Accountability in New York's Schools
Date CapturedFriday April 20, 2007 09:12 AM
How to Meet the Governor's Historic Challenge, Thursday, March 8, 2007. A panel of state and national education experts gathered at the state Capitol in Albany March 8 to examine and debate Gov. Spitzer's historic education reform plan, which aims to hold New York schools more accountable than ever before. This page features a link to a slide presentation by one of the featured speakers, and also includes streaming audio of the event including John C. Reid, Assistant Secretary for Education State of New York; Thomas W. Carroll, President, Foundation for Education Reform & Accountability; Paul E. Peterson Director, Program on Educational Policy and Governance Kennedy School of Government; Moderator: David F. Shaffer, President, Public Policy Institute of New York State; Panelists: Carl Hayden, Chancellor Emeritus, New York State Board of Regents; Richard C. Iannuzzi, President, New York State United Teachers; Timothy G. Kremer, Executive Director, New York State School Boards Association; Thomas L. Rogers, Executive Director, New York State Council of School Superintendents; Sol Stern, Contributing Editor, City Journal and Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute.
Reinterpreting the Development of Reading Skills
Date CapturedMonday March 05, 2007 03:25 PM
"Theories about reading have neglected basic differences in the developmental trajectories of skills related to reading. This essay proposes that some reading skills, such as learning the letters of the alphabet, are constrained to small sets of knowledge that are mastered in relatively brief periods of development. In contrast, other skills, such as vocabulary, are unconstrained by the knowledge to be acquired or the duration of learning. The conceptual, developmental, and methodological constraints on different reading skills are described in this essay that identifies various types of constraints on reading constructs and measures. Examples of reading research and assessment are discussed to illustrate (a) how the constraints can help to explain transitory correlational patterns among reading data, (b) how proxy effects surrounding constrained skills influence interpretations of reading development, (c) how prescriptions to teach constrained skills are causal misinterpretations of longitudinal correlations, and (d) why interventions on constrained skills usually lead only to temporary gains on skills aligned with the constrained skill." Paris, S.G. (2005, April/May/June). Reinterpreting the Development of Reading Skills. Reading Research Quarterly, 40(2), 184–202. doi: 10.1598/RRQ.40.2.3
Problem Solving in the PISA and TIMSS 2003 Assessments
Date CapturedTuesday December 26, 2006 01:38 PM
NCES: When examining the outcomes of education at local, state, national, or international levels, one of the major concerns of educators is whether students are able to employ the knowledge and skills they have acquired in formal schooling and through daily living experiences to solve problems. Students’ capabilities to solve problems are necessary not only for the demands of everyday life—personal, social, and public decisionmaking—but also for their future careers and their ability to continue learning in formal education settings. The purpose of this report is to compare and contrast features of the problem-solving tasks found in the 2003 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the 2003 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)." Dossey, J.A., McCrone, S.A., and O’Sullivan, C. (2006). Problem Solving in the PISA and TIMSS 2003 Assessments (NCES 2007-049). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved December 26, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
The No Child Left Behind Act: Have Federal Funds Been Left Behind?
Date CapturedMonday November 20, 2006 01:57 PM
"The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) imposes new requirements on state education systems and provides additional education funding. This paper estimates education cost functions, predicts the spending required to support NCLB standards, and compares this spending with the funding available through NCLB. This analysis is conducted for Kansas and Missouri, which have similar education environments but very different standards. We find that new federal funding is sufficient to support very low standards for student performance, but cannot come close to funding high standards without implausibly large increases in schooldistrict efficiency. Because of the limited federal funding and the severe penalties in NCLB when a school does not meet its state’s standards, states have a strong incentive to keep their standards low. NCLB needs to be reformed so that it will encourage high standards." *The authors are Professor of Public Administration, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University; Associate Professor of Public Administration, University of Nevada at Los Vegas; and Professor of Public Administration and Economics, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University, respectively. We are grateful to David Sjoquist for helpful comments. 1 1. Introduction The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) both imposes mandates on states and gives them more federal education funding. The authors are William Duncombe, Anna Lukemeyer and John Yinger, Professor of Public Administration, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University; Associate Professor of Public Administration, University of Nevada at Los Vegas; and Professor of Public Administration and Economics, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University, respectively.
Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 Nonresponse Bias Analysis
Date CapturedWednesday November 01, 2006 11:47 AM
This NCES technical report explores the extent of potential bias introduced into the U.S. TIMSS study through nonresponse on the part of schools. Data from the third cycle of TIMSS, conducted in April-June, 2003, are the basis for the analyses.The investigation into nonresponse bias at the school level for U.S. TIMSS 2003 samples for grades 4 and 8 shows that there was no statistically significant relationship detected between participation status and the majority of school characteristics that are available for analysis. Ferraro, D., and Van de Kerckhove, W. (2006). Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 Nonresponse Bias Analysis (NCES 2007-044). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved November 1, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Think tank urges Florida school reforms, no class-size limits
Date CapturedWednesday September 13, 2006 10:20 AM
Orlando Sentinel reports, "New educational reforms could be ahead for Florida schools now that a conservative think tank has called for better-qualified teachers, tougher reading and math standards and an end to the state's constitutional directive to reduce class sizes."
State High School Exit Exams: A Challenging Year
Date CapturedThursday August 17, 2006 07:48 AM
Authors: Nancy Kober, Dalia Zabala, Naomi Chudowsky, Victor Chudowsky, Keith Gayler, and Jennifer McMurrer. Center on Education Policy report finds, "... no state legislature adopted a new exit exam requirement in 2006 although Maryland, Washington, and Oklahoma are following through on plans set earlier to phase in exit exams. Of the four states scheduled to begin withholding diplomas based on exam performance this year, Arizona and California did so only after facing significant legal challenges, while Utah backed down from its earlier plans to do so. Idaho began withholding diplomas in 2006 with less conflict and controversy than other states experienced. Meanwhile, most of the 25 states that currently require or are phasing in exit exams have moved to create greater flexibility and support to help struggling students meet the exam requirements."
Some students with limited English skills face new hurdle: State-ordered exam stirs Binghamton concerns
Date CapturedWednesday August 09, 2006 08:18 AM
Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin reports, "Until now, students with less than three years of U.S. schooling were exempt from the state ELA test, which is used to gauge whether schools are making adequate yearly progress for their students under No Child Left Behind. Instead, they could take a different test, the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test. But the federal government ruled this procedure fails to comply with No Child Left Behind rules, Stevens [Deputy Education Commissioner ] said."
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT: Assistance from Education Could Help States Better Measure Progress of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Date CapturedThursday July 27, 2006 09:57 AM
GAO July 2006 study, "The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLBA) focused attention on the academic achievement of more than 5 million students with limited English proficiency. Obtaining valid test results for these students is challenging, given their language barriers. This report describes (1) the extent to which these students are meeting annual academic progress goals, (2) what states have done to ensure the validity of their academic assessments, (3) what states are doing to ensure the validity of their English language proficiency assessments, and (4) how the U.S. Department of Education (Education) is supporting states’ efforts to meet NCLBA’s assessment requirements for these students."
Comparing Mathematics Content in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), and Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 Assessments
Date CapturedTuesday May 23, 2006 10:49 AM
This report describes a study that was undertaken to compare the content of three mathematics assessments conducted in 2003: the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) fourth- and eighth-grade assessments; the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), which also assessed mathematics at the fourth- and eighth-grade levels; and the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), which assessed the mathematical literacy of 15-year-old students. Its aim is to provide information that will be useful for interpreting and comparing the results from the three assessments, based on an in-depth look at the content of the respective frameworks and assessment items. The report draws upon information provided by the developers of the assessments, as well as data obtained from an expert panel convened to compare the frameworks and items from the three assessments on various dimensions.
Why Newsweek’s List of America’s 100 Best High Schools Doesn’t Make The Grade
Date CapturedMonday March 06, 2006 10:19 PM
By Andrew J. Rotherham and Sara Mead
PRIMARY PROGRESS, SECONDARY CHALLENGE: A STATE-BY-STATE LOOK AT STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT PATTERNS
Date CapturedThursday March 02, 2006 08:54 PM
Primary Progress, Secondary Challenge: A State-by-State Look at Student Achievement Patterns. Education Trust, March 2006. This report examines state assessment results in reading and math between 2003 and 2005.
The State of State Science Standards 2005 (Thomas B. Fordham Institute)
Date CapturedThursday December 08, 2005 03:13 PM
Written by Paul R. Gross, The State of State Science Standards finds that even though the majority of states have reworked, or crafted from scratch, their science standards over the past five years, we're no better off now than before.

Student Mobility

K-12 Education: Many Challenges Arise in Educating Students Who Change Schools Frequently
Date CapturedMonday December 20, 2010 09:20 PM
GAO-11-40 November 18, 2010 - The recent economic downturn, with foreclosures and homelessness, may be increasing student mobility.
Providing Highly Mobile Students with an Effective Education
Date CapturedSaturday September 23, 2006 10:48 PM
"Various military branches have devised strategies to address these [highly mobile children] challenges and to promote academic and social success, which in some case may be useful for other subpopulations. They include: the establishment of family and educational support networks during deployments; the encouragement of parental involvement associated with high academic achievement; the use of school counselors to meet the needs of military adolescents and to advocate and implement strategies for smoother school transitions; and a "corporate culture" that supports families and encourages strong school-family-military partnerships." Walls, Charles A. ERIC Identifier: ED482918 Publication Date: 2003-11-00. ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education.
The Determinants of Student Achievement in Ohio’s Public Schools
Date CapturedFriday August 04, 2006 01:08 AM
By Matthew Carr, Education Policy Director, Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions. Carr writes, "To capture the changing dynamics of both different academic subjects and students at different ages, this analysis evaluates student performance in five subjects (math, reading, writing, science and citizenship) across grades 3 to 12. This combination gives us 21 separate analyses, or mathematical models. Controls were also included for geography, student socio-economic status, race, and learning disability. This study breaks new ground by also analyzing the factors that influence student performance in charter schools."
Moving Forward -- Helping New York’s high mobility students to succeed
Date CapturedWednesday June 14, 2006 10:51 AM
by Sheila Kaplan with Clorinda Valenti. Raising the level of educational achievement among low-income and minority students has been the focus of numerous public and private initiatives and public policy programs over the years. Myriad factors — social, physical, educational, and familial — have been identified to account for persistent low achievement among particular populations. However, an important variable, student mobility, remains understudied and unaddressed in New York state.

Student Privacy

“Using Data Safely and Effectively to Strengthen Student Performance”
Date CapturedThursday June 26, 2014 10:28 AM
Written Testimony of Thomas C. Murray State and District Digital Learning Director Alliance for Excellent Education Prepared for the House Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and House Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education June 25, 2014

Supplemental Educational Services (SES)

State Implementation of Supplemental Educational Services under the No Child Left Behind Act
Date CapturedThursday March 15, 2007 08:48 AM
This CEP report was written by Angela Minnici, CEP senior research associate, and Alice P. Bartley, CEP research intern."Key Findings: Limited capacity to monitor -- Many states (38) are unable to monitor 'to a great extent' the quality and effectiveness of SES providers; only 10 states reported being able to do so. The greatest capacity challenges for states in meeting this federal SES monitoring requirement are insufficient numbers of staff and inadequate federal funding. Use of criteria in law -- Almost all (between 47 and 49) of the state education agencies we surveyed reported using the criteria required by NCLB law and federal guidance to review and approve applications from potential supplemental service providers. These criteria are intended to ensure that providers are financially sound, have a record of effectiveness, use research-based strategies, provide services consistent with district instruction, and adhere to health, safety, and civil rights laws. w Frequent updating. NCLB requires states to promote maximum participation of SES providers so that parents have as many choices as possible. Therefore, it is important for states to provide parents and school districts with a current and accurate list of SES providers that they can choose from. On our survey, 20 states said they review new SES provider applications more often than once a year (the minimum required by the NCLB law), and 22 states reported updating their SES provider lists more than once a year. Different reapplication policies -- The reapplication process varies widely by state. In 13 states, SES providers never have to formally reapply, and in 12 states, SES providers have to reapply every year." Nancy Kober, a CEP consultant, edited the report. Jack Jennings, CEP’s president and CEO, and Diane Stark Rentner, CEP’s director of national programs, provided advice and assistance.
The Effects of Theoretically Different Instruction and Student Characteristics on the Skills of Struggling Readers
Date CapturedMonday March 05, 2007 03:41 PM
"This study investigated the effectiveness of combining enhanced classroom instruction and intense supplemental intervention for struggling readers in first grade. Further, it compared two supplemental interventions derived from distinct theoretical orientations, examining them in terms of effects on academic outcomes and whether children's characteristics were differentially related to an instructional intervention." Mathes, P.G., Denton, C.A., Fletcher, J.M., Anthony, J.L., Francis, D.J., & Schatschneider, C. (2005, April/May/June). The Effects of Theoretically Different Instruction and Student Characteristics on the Skills of Struggling Readers. Reading Research Quarterly, 40(2), 148–182. doi: 10.1598/RRQ.40.2.2
Help Rochester student athletes make grade
Date CapturedThursday September 28, 2006 06:36 AM
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle guest essayists and parents Jim Greco and Bowers, former school board member write, "The school must provide opportunities for probationary athletes to receive academic assistance or tutoring. It directs the coach of the sport in which the student participates; his or her guidance counselors, teacher or teachers and the school's athletic and academy directors to collectively monitor the probationary athlete's academic progress. "

Teacher Evaluation

“Study of Promising Features of Teacher Preparation Programs”
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2012 03:59 PM
COMMENTS OF THE ELECTRONIC PRIVACY INFORMATION CENTER to THE INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES of the DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of New System of Records: For the foregoing reasons, the Education Department must revise its Privacy Act notice for the Study of Promising Features of Teacher Preparation Programs to: (1) limit the collection of student information to only that which is necessary and relevant; and (2) clarify the circumstances under which it will disclose information pursuant to the routine use exception.
NY Assemblywoman Galef: A.9822
Date CapturedTuesday April 17, 2012 01:57 PM
All personnel records of classroom teachers used to evaluate or generated as the result of an evaluation of performance under the control of any school district or board of cooperative educational services, shall be considered confidential and not subject to inspection or review by a parent of a student or any other person without the express written content of such teacher except as may be mandated by lawful court order; provided that a school district or board of cooper- ative educational services may, without first obtaining consent or a court order, release data summarizing the aggregate results of such performance evaluations..

Teacher Preparation

“Study of Promising Features of Teacher Preparation Programs”
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2012 03:59 PM
COMMENTS OF THE ELECTRONIC PRIVACY INFORMATION CENTER to THE INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES of the DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of New System of Records: For the foregoing reasons, the Education Department must revise its Privacy Act notice for the Study of Promising Features of Teacher Preparation Programs to: (1) limit the collection of student information to only that which is necessary and relevant; and (2) clarify the circumstances under which it will disclose information pursuant to the routine use exception.
To Teach or Not to Teach? Teaching Experience and Preparation Among 1992-1993 Bachelor's Degree Recipients 10 Years After College
Date CapturedWednesday August 01, 2007 10:42 AM
The report provides an overview of teachers’ job satisfaction and, for those not teaching in 2002-03, the main reason for not teaching. The second section looks at graduates’ preparation for teaching, including the key steps of completing a teacher education program, serving as a student teacher, and earning certification. Finally, the report examines the main reasons graduates who never taught gave for deciding against teaching. Alt, M.N., and Henke, R.R. (2007). To Teach or Not to Teach? Teaching Experience and Preparation Among 1992–93 Bachelor’s Degree Recipients 10 Years After College (NCES 2007-163). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Keeping New Teachers: A First Look at the Influences of Induction in the Chicago Public Schools
Date CapturedThursday March 01, 2007 07:16 PM
1/2007. Kavita Kapadia and Vanessa Coca; with John Q. Easton. Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR), "By itself, induction programming had no significant impact on teachers' satisfaction with their job. However, strong levels of mentoring and support for new teachers—regardless of whether it was part of a formal induction program—greatly improved teachers' experiences and intentions to continue teaching. This report also suggests that high quality induction be both intensive and contextual so that it takes into need the contextual factors that affect teachers' experiences and intentions."
Educating School Teachers
Date CapturedMonday September 18, 2006 06:47 PM
Study author Arthur Levine, who recently left the presidency of Teachers College, Columbia University to become president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation concludes "that a majority of teacher education graduates are prepared in university-based programs that suffer from low admission and graduation standards. Their faculties, curriculums and research are disconnected from school practice and practitioners. There are wide variations in program quality, with the majority of teachers prepared in lower quality programs. Both state and accreditation standards for maintaining quality are ineffective."

Teacher Quality

Updated Guidance on the Collection and Reporting of Teacher and Course Data in the Student Information Repository System (SIRS)
Date CapturedWednesday February 29, 2012 09:19 AM
This memorandum provides important updates on the implementation of federal and State requirements for reporting professional staff and course data for students. This guidance directly addresses three issues: (1) Federal and State requirements for charter and other public schools, school districts, and BOCES to report additional student data, including course enrollment and the teachers/principals responsible for a student’s instruction; (2) The timeline for reporting new data elements; and (3) Implementation strategies for collecting and reporting these data.
Rigor at Risk: Reaffirming Quality in the High School Curriculum
Date CapturedWednesday May 16, 2007 07:10 AM
The Rigor at Risk report suggests that some students progress toward college readiness in high school, but many lose momentum during their last two years there. There are action steps that states and schools can take to improve the rigor of high school core courses: 1. Specify the number and kinds of courses that students need to take to graduate from high school ready for college and work. 2. Align high school course outcomes with state standards that are driven by the requirements of postsecondary education and work. 3. Hire qualified teachers and provide training or professional development support to help them improve the quality of the courses they teach. 4. Expand access for all students to high-quality, vertically aligned core courses. 5. Measure results at the course level.
The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher
Date CapturedFriday April 27, 2007 08:39 AM
Study finds, "Over the past two decades, teachers’ satisfaction with their careers has increased. According to the findings of this year’s MetLife Survey, over half (56%) are very satisfied with their careers. This is a striking contrast to the findings reported in the 1986 Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher: Restructuring the Teaching Profession when as few as 33% of teachers reported career satisfaction. One reason to measure teacher satisfaction is as an indication of whether or not a teacher will remain in the profession. Although analyses of this year’s MetLife Survey data indicate that teacher satisfaction is one of the predictors of whether a teacher intends to switch careers, it is not the only one. Evidence of this can be found in the number of teachers who plan to leave teaching in the next five years. One-quarter of teachers (27%) say they are likely to leave teaching. Despite the fact that teachers’ career satisfaction has increased by over 20 points since 1986, the number of teachers at-risk for changing careers has stayed the same. These results indicate that retaining high-quality teachers in the profession is as much of an issue today as it was two decades ago."
ACCOUNTABILITY for ALL
Date CapturedMonday March 12, 2007 02:41 PM
5 Ways to Reform the Teacher Discipline Process, New York State School Boards Association (2007).
Inside Public Education 2007
Date CapturedFriday March 09, 2007 10:56 AM
Inside Public Education reports the results of a survey conducted by the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion and funded by the Dyson Foundation. Residents of Dutchess and Ulster Counties in New York were interviewed about the public schools in their communities. They shared their opinions, experiences, and insights about what they consider to be the best and the worst of public education in the school district where they live.
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner
Date CapturedMonday January 08, 2007 09:07 AM
New York State Education Department (NYSED) Public Announcement of District/School Data: During the week of January 8, the Department will release to the media and the public a list of public schools and districts in improvement status for the 2006-07 school year and the percentage of core courses taught by teachers who were highly qualified in 2005-06 in each public school district and charter school. Providers of NCLB Supplemental Educational Services: The next application period to become a New York State-approved supplemental educational services provider begins January 19, 2007. On behalf of the Board of Regents, the Department notifies districts of location, public schools, and nonpublic schools in the same geographic area of any actions that the Board of Regents has taken related to charter schools as well as the receipt of any new proposed charter applications, proposed renewal applications, or proposed revisions. The notified districts of location, public schools, and nonpublic schools are encouraged to comment on the proposed action and solicit comments from the community through a public hearing on the proposed action. (Read more announcements here)
SCHOOL SANITY: COURT OPTS FOR RESTRAINT
Date CapturedTuesday November 21, 2006 06:44 AM
NY Post contributor E.J. McMahon, director of the Manhattan Institute's Empire Center for New York State Policy writes, "It will take a determined governor to prevent legislators and the usual special-interest groups from using CFE as an excuse to promote Albany's traditional education 'solution' - lots more money, no reform. But thanks to the Court of Appeals, these issues at least will be contested in the right forum. In one of his more beneficial legacies, Pataki stocked New York's highest court with judges who were unwilling to micromanage policy. They've now kicked the ball back to the Legislature, once and for all. CFE and its allies must turn their attention to direct lobbying of the people's elected representatives - which is just the way it should be."
Giving Kids the Chaff: How to Find and Keep the Teachers We Need
Date CapturedMonday September 25, 2006 09:08 AM
Marie Gryphon, director of educational programs at the Institute for Humane Studies and an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute concludes, "Teacher quality can be improved dramatically when hiring managers understand the attributes that make for good teachers and are given the right incentives to make good hiring decisions. Many of the current public policy proposals to improve educational quality in American public schools, such as merit pay and hiring bonuses for teachers with subjectspecific expertise, attempt to create the same economic stimuli that are naturally present in competitive markets. Allowing families to choose their schools, and giving schools the freedom and market incentives to make wise personnel decisions, will reward good schools and good teachers, providing more students with the high-quality education they deserve."
Think tank urges Florida school reforms, no class-size limits
Date CapturedWednesday September 13, 2006 10:20 AM
Orlando Sentinel reports, "New educational reforms could be ahead for Florida schools now that a conservative think tank has called for better-qualified teachers, tougher reading and math standards and an end to the state's constitutional directive to reduce class sizes."
Certification and Private School Teachers' Transfers to Public Schools
Date CapturedThursday September 07, 2006 10:25 AM
This Issue Brief was authored by Emily W. Holt, Mary McLaughlin, and Daniel J. McGrath of the Education Statistics Services Institute (ESSI). "In three out of four time periods, higher percentages of movers who held state certification in year two of the time period only switched to public schools than did those without regular state certifications in their main assignment in either year of the time period. In all four time periods for which data were collected, higher percentages of movers with regular state certifications in both years of the time period moved to public schools than did their peers without the certification. However, regardless of certification status, 11 percent or fewer of private school teachers changed schools during any 2-year period."
Inequality and the Right to Learn: Access to Qualified Teachers in California's Public Schools
Date CapturedTuesday September 05, 2006 06:46 PM
By Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University. "The article outlines the legal rationale for insisting on access to qualified teachers for all students, analyzes the reasons for the current shortfalls in California, and proposes a set of remedies based on research and policy outcomes elsewhere." Teachers College Record Volume 106 Number 10, 2004, p. 1936-1966. http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11677, Date Accessed: 9/5/2006 5:46:06 PM
The Determinants of Student Achievement in Ohio’s Public Schools
Date CapturedFriday August 04, 2006 01:08 AM
By Matthew Carr, Education Policy Director, Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions. Carr writes, "To capture the changing dynamics of both different academic subjects and students at different ages, this analysis evaluates student performance in five subjects (math, reading, writing, science and citizenship) across grades 3 to 12. This combination gives us 21 separate analyses, or mathematical models. Controls were also included for geography, student socio-economic status, race, and learning disability. This study breaks new ground by also analyzing the factors that influence student performance in charter schools."
Qualifications of Public Secondary School History Teachers, 1999–2000
Date CapturedThursday August 03, 2006 08:05 PM
This NCES Issue Brief "reports the combination of certifications and majors and minors to which secondary-level history students are exposed and how these qualifications vary across schools with differing levels of student poverty. Data from the NCES 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) teacher and school questionnaires indicate that students in the lowest poverty schools were the least likely to have a teacher with both an out-of-field certification and an out-of-field major or minor."
TEACHING INEQUALITY: HOW POOR AND MINORITY STUDENTS ARE SHORTCHANGED ON TEACHER QUALITY
Date CapturedThursday June 08, 2006 06:44 PM
A Report and Recommendations by the Education Trust By Heather G. Peske and Kati Haycock.

Teaching as a Profession

To Teach or Not to Teach? Teaching Experience and Preparation Among 1992-1993 Bachelor's Degree Recipients 10 Years After College
Date CapturedWednesday August 01, 2007 10:42 AM
The report provides an overview of teachers’ job satisfaction and, for those not teaching in 2002-03, the main reason for not teaching. The second section looks at graduates’ preparation for teaching, including the key steps of completing a teacher education program, serving as a student teacher, and earning certification. Finally, the report examines the main reasons graduates who never taught gave for deciding against teaching. Alt, M.N., and Henke, R.R. (2007). To Teach or Not to Teach? Teaching Experience and Preparation Among 1992–93 Bachelor’s Degree Recipients 10 Years After College (NCES 2007-163). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
New York Suburban School Districts Among Top Spenders
Date CapturedSunday June 10, 2007 10:43 AM
NY Times reports, "New York’s high teacher costs are partly attributable to smaller class sizes: The state’s suburban districts, for instance, employ far more teachers than the rest of the country — 76 per 1,000 students, compared with the national average of 60 — but only slightly more than the New Jersey suburbs, at 74, and Fairfield, at 70. New York’s suburban districts, though, pay more for each teacher, even compared with New Jersey and Connecticut — about $133,000 in salary and benefits for each full-time teacher, compared with $94,000 in northern New Jersey and $100,000 in Fairfield, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Mr. Ernst said teacher salaries reflect higher costs in the state, and a more favorable legal and political atmosphere for labor in New York that makes it difficult to get concessions in years when money is tight. But Richard C. Iannuzzi, president of the New York State United Teachers, said teacher salaries were simply a further demonstration of the state’s commitment to education."
The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher
Date CapturedFriday April 27, 2007 08:39 AM
Study finds, "Over the past two decades, teachers’ satisfaction with their careers has increased. According to the findings of this year’s MetLife Survey, over half (56%) are very satisfied with their careers. This is a striking contrast to the findings reported in the 1986 Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher: Restructuring the Teaching Profession when as few as 33% of teachers reported career satisfaction. One reason to measure teacher satisfaction is as an indication of whether or not a teacher will remain in the profession. Although analyses of this year’s MetLife Survey data indicate that teacher satisfaction is one of the predictors of whether a teacher intends to switch careers, it is not the only one. Evidence of this can be found in the number of teachers who plan to leave teaching in the next five years. One-quarter of teachers (27%) say they are likely to leave teaching. Despite the fact that teachers’ career satisfaction has increased by over 20 points since 1986, the number of teachers at-risk for changing careers has stayed the same. These results indicate that retaining high-quality teachers in the profession is as much of an issue today as it was two decades ago."
The Segregation of American Teachers
Date CapturedWednesday February 21, 2007 09:44 AM
By Erica Frankenberg, M.Ed., is a Research Assistant at The Civil Rights Project and Professor Gary Orfield, Professor of Education and Social Policy and Director of the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University. "This report shows that in an increasingly segregated national system of schools, faculty segregation tends to add to — rather than counteract — the separation of students. We see that the white teachers, who continue to dominate the teaching profession, tend to grow up with little racial/ethnic diversity in their own education or experience. Not only did white teachers, on average, attend schools when they were elementary school students that were over 90% white, they are currently teaching in schools where almost 90% of their faculty colleagues are white and over 70% of students are white."
Frozen Assets: Rethinking Teacher Contracts Could Free Billions for School Reform
Date CapturedTuesday January 09, 2007 06:57 AM
Education Sector report written by Marguerite Rosa . Many common provisions of teacher contracts require school districts to spend substantial sums to implement policies which research has shown have a weak or inconsistent relationship with student learning. This report examines eight such provisions: Increases in teacher salaries based on years of experience; Increases in teacher salaries based on educational credentials and experiences; Professional development days; Number of paid sick and personal days; Class-size limitations; Use of teachers’ aides; Generous health and insurance benefits; and Generous retirement benefits.
NYSSBA's Opinion - Taylor Law
Date CapturedThursday August 03, 2006 11:08 AM
By Timothy G. Kremer, Executive Director, New York State School Boards Association. Kremer writes on property taxes and the Taylor Law, "The problem is that the Taylor Law contains only a vague definition of bad-faith bargaining. PERB under the current chairman has been even-handed in its rulings, but past PERBS have been friendlier to the unions. The Abbate-Robach bills don’t punish the school board or mayor, but the property taxpayer. And it’s not as if public employees are still underpaid as they once were. A typical teacher earns an average of $53,000 in New York State. Public employees’ health insurance plans and retirement benefits are among the best. That they are somehow being taken advantage of at the bargaining table by cold-hearted local and state governments is pure fiction."
Echo Chamber: The National Education Associations's Campaign Against NCLB
Date CapturedTuesday July 11, 2006 01:59 PM
By Joe Williams. "This Education Sector report examines the financial relationships between the NEA and a number of organizations that have been sharply critical of NCLB."
A Better Bargain: Overhauling Teacher Collective Bargaining for the 21st Century
Date CapturedThursday June 29, 2006 05:49 PM
By Frederick M. Hess, American Enterprise Institute and Martin R. West, Brookings Institution.
Teacher Qualifications, Instructional Practices, and Reading and Mathematics Gains of Kindergartners
Date CapturedWednesday March 29, 2006 11:23 AM
This Research and Development (R&D) report uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K) to explore relationships between kindergarten teachers' reports of their qualifications and instructional practices and direct assessments of children's reading and mathematics achievement during the kindergarten year. Spending more time on subject and working within a full-day kindergarten structure were found to be associated with relatively large gains in achievement.
Is There a “Qualified Teacher” Shortage?
Date CapturedTuesday February 21, 2006 05:07 PM
Is There a “Qualified Teacher” Shortage? What factors do affect the market for teachers, anyway? by MICHAEL PODGURSKY. Education Next, Spring 2006. Hoover Institution.
Unintended Consequences: The Case for Reforming the Staffing Rules in Urban Teachers Union Contracts
Date CapturedSaturday February 18, 2006 02:55 PM
by Jessica Levin, Jennifer Mulhern and Joan Schunck. November 2005. Unintended Consequences: The Case for Reforming The Staffing Rules in Urban Teachers Union Contracts shows how contractual staffing rules undermine urban schools and the educational needs of their students.
Teacher Professional Development in 1999-2000: What Teachers, Principals, and District Staff Report
Date CapturedFriday January 27, 2006 12:44 PM
NCES, 2006. This report uses data from the Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) to describe teacher professional development activities in 1999–2000. The first part of the report examines the ways in which districts and schools organize and manage professional development, and the second part describes the extent to which teachers participate in various types of professional development activities.
Teacher Education at the Community College: Partnership and Collaboration
Date CapturedSunday December 18, 2005 03:36 PM
Allen, Robin. ERIC Identifier: ED467986. Publication Date: 2002-05-00. Community colleges are examining their role in helping to meet the need for teachers in their own communities.
Education’s Information Could Help States Further Implement Teacher Qualification Requirements
Date CapturedMonday December 12, 2005 04:43 PM
GAO-06-25 NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT Improved Accessibility to Education’s Information Could Help States Further Implement Teacher Qualification Requirements.
Teacher Attrition: A Costly Loss to the Nation, and to the States
Date CapturedWednesday December 07, 2005 09:57 AM
Alliance for Excellent Education: New teacher turnover rates can be cut in half through comprehensive induction, which helps to develop novice teachers into high-quality professionals who improve student achievement.
How Changes in Entry Requirements Alter the Teacher Workforce and Affect Student Achievement
Date CapturedSaturday December 03, 2005 02:07 PM
November 2005. Donald Boyd (U at Albany) Hamilton Lankford (U at Albany), Pamela Grossman (Stanford University), Susanna Loeb (Stanford University), and James Wyckoff(U at Albany).

Technology

Protecting Children In The Internet Age
Date CapturedMonday June 11, 2007 01:50 PM
New York State Senate Task Force On Critical Choices
Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software Products: Findings from the First Student Cohort
Date CapturedThursday April 05, 2007 09:16 AM
National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance study finds: "Test scores were not significantly higher in classrooms using the reading and mathematics software products than those in control classrooms. In each of the four groups of products-reading in first grade and in fourth grade, mathematics in sixth grade, and high school algebra-the evaluation found no significant differences in student achievement between the classrooms that used the technology products and classrooms that did not. There was substantial variation between schools regarding the effects on student achievement. Although the study collected data on many school and classroom characteristics, only two characteristics were related to the variation in reading achievement. For first grade, effects were larger in schools that had smaller student-teacher ratios (a measure of class size). For fourth grade, effects were larger when treatment teachers reported higher levels of use of the study product." Dynarski, Mark, Roberto Agodini, Sheila Heaviside, Timothy Novak, Nancy Carey, Larissa Campuzano, Barbara Means, Robert Murphy, William Penuel, Hal Javitz, Deborah Emery, and Willow Sussex. Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software Products: Findings from the First Student Cohort, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, 2007. Prepared under Contract No.: ED-01-CO-0039/0007 with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.
Video-gaming American schools
Date CapturedThursday October 19, 2006 09:18 AM
The Enquirer reports, "One of the nation's most prestigious scientific groups on Tuesday put video games into play in an ambitious new bid to transform American education. The Federation of American Scientists called for major investment in digital educational games that could reshape how students learn and workers are trained for 21st century jobs."
Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003
Date CapturedTuesday September 05, 2006 11:00 AM
This report examines the use of computers and the Internet by American children enrolled in nursery school and students in kindergarten through grade 12. One of the more important findings presented in the report is that schools appear to help narrow the disparities between different types of students in terms of computer use. Differences in the rates of computer use are smaller at school than they are at home when considering such characteristics as race/ethnicity, family income, and parental education. DeBell, M., and Chapman, C. (2006). Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003 (NCES 2006– 065). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Differences in Actual and Perceived Online Skills: The Role of Gender
Date CapturedSunday July 02, 2006 07:27 PM
Differences in Actual and Perceived Online Skills: The Role of Gender by Eszter Hargittai and Steven Shafer 2006. Social Science Quarterly. 87(2):432-448. June. The literature on gender and technology use finds that women and men differ significantly in their attitudes toward their technological abilities. Concurrently, existing work on science and math abilities of students suggests that such perceived differences do not always translate into actual disparities. There has been little work exploring gender differences with respect to Internet use ability, especially based on a diverse sample of adult users. Researcher uses new data on Web-use skill to test empirically whether there are differences in men's and women's abilities to navigate online content. Findings suggest that men and women do not differ greatly in their online abilities. However, study finds that women's self-assessed skill is significantly lower than that of men. We discuss the implications of these findings for social inequality with respect to Internet use.
Forum Guide to Elementary/Secondary Virtual Education
Date CapturedThursday June 29, 2006 10:59 AM
This NCES guide provides recommendations for collecting accurate, comparable, and useful data about virtual education in an elementary/secondary education setting.
Does Home Internet Use Influence the Academic Performance of Low-Income Children?
Date CapturedSunday April 30, 2006 08:03 PM
Developmental Psychology, 2006, Vol. 42, No. 3. Linda A. Jackson, Alexander von Eye, Frank A. Biocca, Gretchen Barbatsis, Yong Zhao, & Hiram E. Fitzgerald; Michigan State University. Findings indicated that children who used the Internet more had higher scores on standardized tests of reading achievement and higher grade point averages 6 months, 1 year, and 16 months later than did children who used it less. Older children used the Internet more than did younger children, but age had no effect on the nature or the academic performance benefits of Internet use. Implications for the digital “use” divide are discussed.

The Arts

SCHOOLS BRUSHING UP ON THE ARTS
Date CapturedTuesday July 24, 2007 07:02 AM
NY Post Chuck Bennett reports, "'I didn't want the arts to be a throwaway. I didn't want the arts to be some add-on, some feel-good thing. I think arts education is critical,' Klein [NYC schools chancellor] said. He added that $250 million in this year's school budget will go toward arts education, including the hiring of 141 new teachers. More students also will be eligible to receive an Arts-Endorsed Regents Honors diploma for taking a concentration in arts classes."

Transportation

School Bus Pollution Report Card 2006
Date CapturedWednesday May 24, 2006 09:13 PM
The School Bus Pollution Report Card 2006 report analyzes the amount of pollution released from the average state school bus. Each state received a letter grade (A B, C, or D) for estimated tailpipe emissions of soot, which warrants the most concern because of its potential to cause toxic “hot spots”—areas of higher exposure for children in or near buses.

Tuition and Funding

Working To Learn, Learning to Work: Unlocking the Potential of New York's Adult College Students
Date CapturedTuesday August 14, 2007 07:36 AM
Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy (SCAA) and the Center for an Urban Future (CUF) study, "Specific recommendations include: * Provide financial aid to part-time students in their first year. In 2006, the New York State Legislature took the first step towards assisting working adults by establishing a 'part-time TAP' program. However, New York should abolish the pointless requirement that students study full-time in the first year to qualify for part-time TAP. * Abolish discriminatory TAP benefits and income thresholds for unmarried childless adults, so that they can receive the same benefits at the same income thresholds as all other students. * Abolish all previous financial aid schedules and get rid of the 'don’t come back' rule, which ties students who leave college and return later to the income and benefit schedule in effect when they first entered college. Since schedules are improved every few years, older schedules are considerably less generous than current ones. * Create a remedial education financing program outside of TAP, so that students can enhance their opportunity for academic success while preserving TAP eligibility for creditworthy classes."
Leading Lady: Sallie Mae and the Origins of the Student Loan Controversy
Date CapturedWednesday May 16, 2007 07:52 AM
Education Sector Policy Analyst Erin Dillon explains how a small, government-sponsored program has evolved over four decades into a vast, aggressive, and highly lucrative industry. No company has been more ambitious than Sallie Mae, the industry's dominant player, and the story of Sallie Mae's rise from a government-regulated niche enterprise to a fully private, multi-billion-dollar corporation goes a long way toward explaining how and why the student loan industry has landed at the center of controversy today.
2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04): Undergraduate Financial Aid Estimates for 12 States: 2003–04
Date CapturedTuesday October 24, 2006 02:28 PM
In addition to providing national estimates, the NPSAS:04 survey was designed to provide representative samples of undergraduates in public 2-year, public 4-year, and private not-for-profit 4-year institutions in 12 states: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Tennessee. Prior NPSAS studies have not been representative at the state level. For the in-state undergraduates in each of these 12 selected states, the tables in this E.D. TAB show the average tuition and fees and total price of attendance, the percentages of undergraduates receiving various types of financial aid and the average amounts received, the average net price of attendance after financial aid, average financial need and remaining need after financial aid, cumulative student loan amounts, earnings from work while enrolled, and other aspects of financing an undergraduate education. Berkner, L., and Wei, C.C. (2006). 2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04): Undergraduate Financial Aid Estimates for 12 States: 2003–04 (NCES 2006-158). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved October 24, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.
Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: 2003–04 With a Special Analysis of the Net Price of Attendance and Federal Education Tax Benefits Statistical Analysis Report
Date CapturedWednesday August 23, 2006 03:35 PM
This NCES report provides detailed information about undergraduate tuition and total price of attendance at various types of institutions, the percentage of students receiving various types of financial aid, and the average amounts that they received. Berkner, L., and Wei, C.C. (2006). Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: 2003–04, With a Special Analysis of the Net Price of Attendance and Federal Education Tax Benefits (NCES 2006-186). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
Changes in Staff Distribution and Salaries of Full-time Employees in Postsecondary Institutions:
Date CapturedThursday August 03, 2006 08:26 AM
This NCES study examines the changes that occurred between fall 1993 and fall 2003 in the distribution of staff and average salaries of all full-time staff— faculty, administrators, and support personnel—at postsecondary institutions. Li, X. (2006). Changes in Staff Distribution and Salaries of Full-time Employees in Postsecondary Institutions: 1993–2003 (NCES 2006-152). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
New York City Independent Budget Office Fiscal Brief, July 2006
Date CapturedTuesday August 01, 2006 07:27 AM
By Paul Lopatto. Study finds, "THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK, commonly known as CUNY, is the largest urban public university system in the country, with approximately 450,000 students. Until the city’s fiscal crisis in the 1970s, CUNY charged no tuition. But even with the addition of tuition revenue, CUNY has faced ongoing challenges to its operating budget. CUNY officials say these challenges have hampered their ability to expand and improve the university’s educational programs.IBO’s review of CUNY funding since 1989 finds that the university system has become increasingly reliant on tuition revenue even as it faces year-to-year uncertainty in the sources of its funding and costs to its students."
Dealing With Debt: 1992-93 Bachelor’s Degree Recipients 10 Years Later
Date CapturedWednesday July 05, 2006 10:51 AM
Using data from the 1993–2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Study (B&B:93/03), this NCES report describes the borrowing patterns of 1992–93 bachelor’s degree recipients and examines the repayment of undergraduate Stafford loans for those who had no additional degree enrollment.

Urban Education

Gateways to Democracy: Six Urban Community College Systems
Date CapturedSunday December 18, 2005 03:05 PM
Hirose-Wong, Shannon M. ERIC Identifier: ED438873. Urban community colleges play a key role in higher education by serving economically, educationally, and ethnically disadvantaged, and nationally diverse student populations.
The Case for Reforming Staffing Rules in Urban Teachers Union Contracts
Date CapturedTuesday December 06, 2005 11:27 AM
(The New Teacher Project, 2005) by Jessica Levin, Jennifer Mulhern and Joan Schunck. Supporting the ability of urban schools to hire and staff effectively may be the remedy needed to put the education of urban students on par with their suburban counterparts.
Children in Urban Areas are Increasingly Low Income
Date CapturedFriday November 25, 2005 10:03 PM
National Center for Children in Poverty. More than half the children living in urban areas are low income even though most have at least one parent who is employed.

US Department of Education

Directory Information Part 2 (This file is an audio 'wav' file)
Date CapturedSunday December 26, 2010 05:23 PM
Part 2 of EDNY comments on Data Quality Campaign webcast with US ED response.
School and Parent Interaction by Household Language and Poverty Status: 2002-03
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 03:35 PM
NCES: Language minority parents may face a number of challenges when trying to communicate or become involved with their child’s school. This Issue Brief describes school-to-home communication practices and opportunities for parent involvement at school as reported by parents of U.S. school-age students from primarily English- and primarily Spanish-speaking households during the 2002–03 school year. Among the findings: A greater percentage of students in English-speaking households than in Spanish-speaking households had parents who reported receiving personal notes or e-mails about the student; receiving newsletters, memos, or notices addressed to all parents; opportunities to attend general meetings; opportunities to attend school events; and chances to volunteer. Differences were still apparent after taking poverty status into account. This Issue Brief was prepared by Christine Enyeart, Juliet Diehl, Gillian Hampden-Thompson, and Marion Scotchmer of the American Institutes for Research.
The Condition of Education in Brief 2006
Date CapturedSunday August 20, 2006 03:46 PM
Report topics covered "include: public and private enrollment in elementary/secondary education; projections of undergraduate enrollment; racial/ethnic distribution of public school students; student achievement from the National Assessment of Educational Progress in reading, mathematics, and science; adult literacy; status dropout rates; immediate transition to college; school violence and safety; educational attainment; parental choice of schools; expenditures for elementary and secondary education, and federal grants and loans to undergraduate students." Livingston, A. (2006). The Condition of Education 2006 in Brief (NCES 2006-072). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
States, Feds Partner on English Testing
Date CapturedWednesday August 02, 2006 07:45 PM
Infozine reports, "Twenty-four states [including New York] are being invited to work with the U.S. Department of Education to develop acceptable math and reading tests for students with limited English proficiency (LEP). Eighteen were chosen because a review last month found their testing systems, particularly those for LEP students, did not meet standards of the No Child Left Behind law. Six states with approved systems were invited to lend their expertise."
Current Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2003-04
Date CapturedTuesday August 01, 2006 11:47 AM
This NCES brief publication contains data on current expenditures, by state, for public elementary and secondary education for school year 2003-04. It also contains data by state, on median current expenditure per student by school districts, and current expenditures per student by districts at the 5th and 95th percentile. State average current expenditures per student are also included in this report. Johnson, Frank (2006). Current Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2003-04 (NCES 2006-352). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved August 1, 2006 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006352.
The Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate for Public High Schools From the Common Core of Data: School Years 2002–03 and 2003-04
Date CapturedMonday July 10, 2006 09:57 AM
Comparing the averaged freshman graduation rate among public school students in the class of 2002-03 to that of 2003-04 in each of the 48 reporting states and the District of Columbia, 32 states and the District of Columbia experienced increases in the rate, 1 state experienced no change, and 15 states experienced declines in the rate over this 2-year period. Note, a previous version of this report included unstable estimates for Department of Defense schools, which have been removed.
The Condition of Education 2006
Date CapturedThursday June 01, 2006 10:16 AM
The Condition of Education 2006 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 50 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis on international assessments. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2006 print edition includes 50 indicators in five main areas: (1) participation in education; (2) learner outcomes; (3) student effort and educational progress; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education; and (5) the contexts of postsecondary education.

US Education Department

Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003-04
Date CapturedWednesday September 27, 2006 12:53 AM
NCES: The data include such characteristics as the numbers of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Several findings were: These 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers, in 2003-04. The 100 largest districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2002-03. Across these districts, the averaged freshman graduation rate was 68.8 percent. In 19 of the 100 largest districts the rate was 80 percent or higher. The rate was less than 50 percent in 8 of the 100 largest districts. Three states – California, Florida, and Texas – accounted for 41 of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $4,413 in Alpine School District, Utah to a high of $17,652 in Newark City, New Jersey. Dalton, B., Sable, J., and Hoffman, L. (2006). Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003–04 (NCES 2006-329). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
$101.6 Million in Early Reading First Grants Awarded to 25 States
Date CapturedFriday September 01, 2006 10:29 PM
U.S. Department of Education: Early Reading First programs focus on language, cognition and early reading so that young children enter kindergarten with the oral language, phonological awareness, print awareness and knowledge of the alphabet necessary to begin to learn how to read.

Vouchers

Evaluation of D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After One Year
Date CapturedFriday June 22, 2007 08:56 AM
The report studies five key outcomes of the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program: school differences; academic achievement; parental perceptions of school satisfaction and safety; student reports of school satisfaction and safety; and the impact of using a scholarship. The analysis estimates the effects of the program approximately seven months after the start of the students' first school year in the program and finds no statistically significant difference in test scores overall between students who were offered a scholarship and students who were not offered a scholarship. Wolf, Patrick, Babette Gutmann, Michael Puma, Lou Rizzo, Nada Eissa, and Marsha Silverberg. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After One Year. U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2007.
SCHOOL CHOICE BY THE NUMBERS: THE FISCAL EFFECT OF SCHOOL CHOICE PROGRAMS, 1990-2006
Date CapturedMonday May 21, 2007 07:54 AM
Prepared by Susan L. Aud, PhD, SeniorFellow, Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation, "Key findings include: School choice programs have saved a total of about $444 million from 1990 to 2006, including a total of $22 million saved in state budgets and $422 million saved in local public school districts. Every existing school choice program is at least fiscally neutral, and most produce a substantial savings. Only Utah’s Carson Smith voucher program and the two century-old 'town tuitioning' programs in Maine and Vermont are neutral; every other school choice program has produced at least $1 million in savings. In nearly every school choice program, the dollar value of the voucher or scholarship is less than or equal to the state’s formula spending per student. This means states are spending the same amount or less on students in school choice programs than they would have spent on the same students if they had attended public schools, producing a fiscal savings."
Are Public or Private Schools Doing Better? How the NCES Study Is Being Misinterpreted
Date CapturedFriday September 01, 2006 02:27 PM
Shanea Watkins, Policy Analyst in Empirical Studies in the Center for Data Analysis at The Heritage Foundation writes, "The NAEP data are certainly not suitable for establishing whether a specific math or reading achievement outcome is associated with attending either a private or public school. Despite this fact, the results of the NCES study are being interpreted inappropriately to imply that voucher programs, which include private schools, are a bad idea. The research literature that addresses the effec­tiveness of school voucher programs in raising math and reading achievement, based on more sophisticated methodology, is much more convinc­ing and conclusive. Students who attend a private school through a voucher program experience greater gains in math and reading than do their public school counterparts."
Spreading Freedom and Saving Money: The Fiscal Impact of the D.C. Voucher Program
Date CapturedSunday June 25, 2006 10:22 AM
By Leon Michos and Susan Aud. This CATO Institute study examines the fiscal impact of the voucher program on D.C. Public School System and the District of Columbia. The program is currently funded by the federal government and creates a net inflow of funds to both the District and DCPS. This study also examines the fiscal impact of the program under several proposed changes to the law. Those scenarios include funding the program locally, making it universally available to all D.C. public school students, and expanding capacity by including regional private schools.

Webcasts

Data Quality Campaign Release of Data for Action 2010: DQC's State Analysis
Date CapturedMonday March 07, 2011 06:15 PM
On February 16, 2011 DQC discussed the results of its sixth annual state analysis Data for Action 2010, a powerful policymaking tool to drive education leaders to use data in decision making. Data for Action is a series of analyses on states’ ability to collect and use data to improve student success. It provides transparency about state progress and priority actions they need to take to collect and use longitudinal data to improve student success.
Data Quality Campaign Quarterly Issue Meeting: Linking Data Across Agencies: States That Are Making It Work
Date CapturedMonday November 09, 2009 07:27 PM
The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) will host Linking Data Across Agencies: States That Are Making It Work on Thursday, November 12, 2009 from 2:30 to 4:30 P.M. (ET) in Washington, DC at the Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Room 233-235. This meeting will highlight leading states that are successfully linking data across systems and agencies to answer critical policy questions aimed at improving student achievement. A corresponding issue brief co-authored by the DQC and the Forum for Youth Investment will be released at the meeting that captures the current status of states’ ability to link data across agencies and provide several state case studies that capture promising strategies to sharing individual-level data across systems and agencies to improve student achievement. Registration to attend in person is required by Tuesday November 10, 2009 and strongly encouraged if participating in the interactive webcast. Seating is limited, so please sign up early! A video of this session and corresponding issue brief will be available at the campaign’s Web site after November 16, 2009.

Welfare

American Bar Association FERPA comments
Date CapturedThursday January 26, 2012 05:22 PM
FERPA NPRM May 23, 2011
December 2011 FERPA Regulations: Information Sharing Around Child Welfare and Education
Date CapturedThursday January 26, 2012 08:02 AM
The new rules offer expanded opportunities for state or local child welfare and education agencies to share information. However, given that these new regulations do not sufficiently eliminate the barriers to intersystem communication for children in care, we look forward to legislative changes to ensure that child welfare agencies can fulfill their duty to ensure that the educational needs of the children in their care are met.

Workforce Preparation

Laws Governing the Employment of Minors
Date CapturedMonday June 25, 2007 08:57 PM
New York State Department of Labor
Lesson Plan for Education Reform
Date CapturedThursday December 14, 2006 12:49 PM
Business Week reports, "If implemented, the commission's recommendations—signed by 26 members from all corners of the corporate, nonprofit, education, and political worlds—would revolutionize the way children are educated in this country. Among the ideas: a set of Board Examinations allowing all 10th graders to place into college; improved compensation and incentives to attract better quality teachers; an overhaul of the American testing industry; contract-run schools instead of schools run by school boards; improved education for all three- and four-year-olds; standards for state-run funding instead of local funding; legislation for continued education for adults; a new GI Bill; and regionally focused job training."
Tough Choice, Tough Times
Date CapturedThursday December 14, 2006 12:40 PM
National Center on Education and the Economy Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce Executive Summary: READ HERE
Economic Outcomes of High School Completers and Noncompleters 8 Years Later
Date CapturedThursday October 12, 2006 06:49 PM
NCES: The findings suggest that individuals who completed high school within 6 years generally had more favorable economic outcomes than their counterparts who completed high school later or not at all. However, differences in economic outcomes were most prominent between males and females even after controlling for the timing and type of high school credential earned.
The Postsecondary Educational Experiences of High School Career and Technical Education Concentrators: Selected Results From the NELS:88/2000 Postsecondary Education Transcript Study
Date CapturedThursday July 20, 2006 10:19 AM
This NCES report presents information on the postsecondary educational experiences of students from the high school class of 1992 who concentrated in career and technical education (CTE) while in high school, including their postsecondary enrollment, coursetaking, and degree attainment patterns. The report also describes the extent to which high school CTE concentrators pursued the same field at the postsecondary level.
Preparing the Health Workforce
Date CapturedFriday May 19, 2006 05:36 PM
By Eleanor Schiff. A healthy nation depends on an adequate supply of well-educated and well-trained health professionals. As the demographics of the U.S. change with the baby-boom generation beginning to retire and the increasing cultural diversification of our society, the need for a stable or growing number of health professionals and a diverse workforce reflective of our population is increasingly important
Higher Education in PA: A Competitive Asset for Communities. Jennifer S. Very, Dec. 2005
Date CapturedMonday December 05, 2005 08:54 PM
The Brookings Institute: This paper surveys Pennsylvania's higher education landscape and its economic impact, proposing a number of policy approaches to boost collaboration—especially on community revitalization.
Parents' Low Education Leads to Low Income, Despite Full-Time Employment
Date CapturedSaturday December 03, 2005 02:21 PM
National Center for Chidren in Poverty. Parents without some college education continue to lose economic ground despite full-time employment.

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